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Title: SU-F-T-263: Dosimetric Characteristics of the Cine Acquisition Mode of An A-Si EPID

Abstract

Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric characteristics of Varian a-Si-500 electronic portal imaging device (EPID) operated in cine mode particularly considering linearity with delivered dose, dose rate, field size, phantom thickness, MLC speed and common IMRT fields. Methods: The EPID that attached to a Varian Clinac 21iX linear accelerator, was irradiated with 6 and 18 MV using 600 MU/min. Image acquisition is controlled by the IAS3 software, Trigger delay was 6 ms, BeamOnDelay and FrameStartDelay were zero. Different frame rates were utilized. Cine mode response was calculated using MATLAB as summation of mean pixel values in a region of interest of the acquired images. The performance of cine mode was compared to integrated mode and dose measurements in water using CC13 ionization chamber. Results: Figure1 illustrates that cine mode has nonlinear response for small MU, when delivering 10 MU was about 0.5 and 0.64 for 6 and 18 MV respectively. This is because the missing acquired images that were calculated around four images missing in each delivery. With the increase MU the response became linear and comparable with integrated mode and ionization chamber within 2%. Figure 2 shows that cine mode has comparable response with integrated mode and ionization chamber withinmore » 2% with changing dose rate for 10 MU delivered. This indicates that the dose rate change has no effect on nonlinearity of cine mode response. Except nonlinearity, cine mode is well matched to integrated mode response within 2% for field size, phantom thickness, MLC speed dependences. Conclusion: Cine mode has similar dosimetric characteristics to integrated mode with open and IMRT fields, and the main limitation with cine mode is missing images. Therefore, the calibration of EPID images with this mode should be run with large MU, and when IMRT verification field has low MU, the correction for missing images are required.« less

Authors:
;  [1];  [2]; ;  [3]
  1. RMIT University, Melbourne, VIC (Australia)
  2. Peter MacCallum Cancer Institute, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia)
  3. Peter MacCallum Cancer Institute, Melbourne, VIC (Australia)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22648878
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; COMPUTER CODES; DOSE RATES; IMAGES; IONIZATION CHAMBERS; LINEAR ACCELERATORS; NONLINEAR PROBLEMS; RADIOTHERAPY; RATS

Citation Formats

Bawazeer, O, Deb, P, Sarasanandarajah, S, Herath, S, and Kron, T. SU-F-T-263: Dosimetric Characteristics of the Cine Acquisition Mode of An A-Si EPID. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4956403.
Bawazeer, O, Deb, P, Sarasanandarajah, S, Herath, S, & Kron, T. SU-F-T-263: Dosimetric Characteristics of the Cine Acquisition Mode of An A-Si EPID. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956403.
Bawazeer, O, Deb, P, Sarasanandarajah, S, Herath, S, and Kron, T. 2016. "SU-F-T-263: Dosimetric Characteristics of the Cine Acquisition Mode of An A-Si EPID". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956403.
@article{osti_22648878,
title = {SU-F-T-263: Dosimetric Characteristics of the Cine Acquisition Mode of An A-Si EPID},
author = {Bawazeer, O and Deb, P and Sarasanandarajah, S and Herath, S and Kron, T},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric characteristics of Varian a-Si-500 electronic portal imaging device (EPID) operated in cine mode particularly considering linearity with delivered dose, dose rate, field size, phantom thickness, MLC speed and common IMRT fields. Methods: The EPID that attached to a Varian Clinac 21iX linear accelerator, was irradiated with 6 and 18 MV using 600 MU/min. Image acquisition is controlled by the IAS3 software, Trigger delay was 6 ms, BeamOnDelay and FrameStartDelay were zero. Different frame rates were utilized. Cine mode response was calculated using MATLAB as summation of mean pixel values in a region of interest of the acquired images. The performance of cine mode was compared to integrated mode and dose measurements in water using CC13 ionization chamber. Results: Figure1 illustrates that cine mode has nonlinear response for small MU, when delivering 10 MU was about 0.5 and 0.64 for 6 and 18 MV respectively. This is because the missing acquired images that were calculated around four images missing in each delivery. With the increase MU the response became linear and comparable with integrated mode and ionization chamber within 2%. Figure 2 shows that cine mode has comparable response with integrated mode and ionization chamber within 2% with changing dose rate for 10 MU delivered. This indicates that the dose rate change has no effect on nonlinearity of cine mode response. Except nonlinearity, cine mode is well matched to integrated mode response within 2% for field size, phantom thickness, MLC speed dependences. Conclusion: Cine mode has similar dosimetric characteristics to integrated mode with open and IMRT fields, and the main limitation with cine mode is missing images. Therefore, the calibration of EPID images with this mode should be run with large MU, and when IMRT verification field has low MU, the correction for missing images are required.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4956403},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Dosimetric properties of an amorphous-silicon electronic portal imaging device (EPID) operated in a real-time acquisition mode were investigated. This mode will be essential for time-resolved dose verification of dynamic (sliding window) intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and intensity modulated arc radiation therapy (arc-IMRT). The EPID was used in continuous acquisition mode (i.e., ''cine'' mode) where individual sequential image frames are acquired in real time. The properties studied include dose linearity, reproducibility of response, and image stability. Results of using the continuous acquisition mode with several example treatments including dynamic IMRT, arc treatment, and single-arc-IMRT are compared to results using themore » well-studied integrated acquisition mode (i.e., ''frame averaging'' or ''IMRT'' mode). Real-time EPID response was also compared to real-time ion-chamber data for selected points in the deliveries. The example treatment deliveries in both continuous and integrated acquisition modes were converted to arbitrary EPID dose units via a calibration field. The summation of all acquired continuous mode images was compared using percentage dose difference to the single image acquired in the integrated mode using in-field pixels only (defined as those pixels >10% of maximum, in-field signal). Using the continuous acquisition mode, the EPID response was not linear with dose. It was found that the continuous mode dose response corresponded approximately to dropping one image per acquisition session. Reproducibility of EPID response to low monitor units (MUs) was found to be poor but greatly improved with increasing MU. Open field profiles were found to be stable in the cross-plane direction but required several frames to become stable in the in-plane direction. However, both of these issues are clinically insignificant due to arc-IMRT deliveries requiring relatively large monitor units (>100 MU). Analysis of the five IMRT, arc, and arc-IMRT tests revealed that all examples compared to within 2% of maximum dose for more than 95% of in-field pixels. The continuous acquisition mode is suited to time-resolved dosimetry applications including arc-IMRT and dynamic IMRT, giving comparable dose results to the well-studied integrated acquisition mode, although caution should be used in low MU applications. Time-resolved EPID dose information also compared well to time-resolved ion-chamber measurements.« less
  • Purpose: Although reduction of the cine electronic portal imaging device (EPID) acquisition frame rate through multiple frame averaging may reduce hardware memory burden and decrease image noise, it can hinder the continuity of soft-tissue motion leading to poor autotracking results. The impact of motion blurring and image noise on the tracking performance was investigated. Methods: Phantom and patient images were acquired at a frame rate of 12.87 Hz with an amorphous silicon portal imager (AS1000, Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). The maximum frame rate of 12.87 Hz is imposed by the EPID. Low frame rate images were obtained bymore » continuous frame averaging. A previously validated tracking algorithm was employed for autotracking. The difference between the programmed and autotracked positions of a Las Vegas phantom moving in the superior-inferior direction defined the tracking error (δ). Motion blurring was assessed by measuring the area change of the circle with the greatest depth. Additionally, lung tumors on 1747 frames acquired at 11 field angles from four radiotherapy patients are manually and automatically tracked with varying frame averaging. δ was defined by the position difference of the two tracking methods. Image noise was defined as the standard deviation of the background intensity. Motion blurring and image noise are correlated with δ using Pearson correlation coefficient (R). Results: For both phantom and patient studies, the autotracking errors increased at frame rates lower than 4.29 Hz. Above 4.29 Hz, changes in errors were negligible withδ < 1.60 mm. Motion blurring and image noise were observed to increase and decrease with frame averaging, respectively. Motion blurring and tracking errors were significantly correlated for the phantom (R = 0.94) and patient studies (R = 0.72). Moderate to poor correlation was found between image noise and tracking error with R −0.58 and −0.19 for both studies, respectively. Conclusions: Cine EPID image acquisition at the frame rate of at least 4.29 Hz is recommended. Motion blurring in the images with frame rates below 4.29 Hz can significantly reduce the accuracy of autotracking.« less
  • Purpose: Although reduction of the cine EPID acquisition frame rate through multiple frame averaging may reduce hardware memory burden and decrease image noise, it can hinder the continuity of soft-tissue motion leading to poor auto-tracking results. The impact of motion blurring and image noise on the tracking performance was investigated. Methods: Phantom and patient images were acquired at a frame rate of 12.87Hz on an AS1000 portal imager. Low frame rate images were obtained by continuous frame averaging. A previously validated tracking algorithm was employed for auto-tracking. The difference between the programmed and auto-tracked positions of a Las Vegas phantommore » moving in the superior-inferior direction defined the tracking error (δ). Motion blurring was assessed by measuring the area change of the circle with the greatest depth. Additionally, lung tumors on 1747 frames acquired at eleven field angles from four radiotherapy patients are manually and automatically tracked with varying frame averaging. δ was defined by the position difference of the two tracking methods. Image noise was defined as the standard deviation of the background intensity. Motion blurring and image noise were correlated with δ using Pearson correlation coefficient (R). Results: For both phantom and patient studies, the auto-tracking errors increased at frame rates lower than 4.29Hz. Above 4.29Hz, changes in errors were negligible with δ<1.60mm. Motion blurring and image noise were observed to increase and decrease with frame averaging, respectively. Motion blurring and tracking errors were significantly correlated for the phantom (R=0.94) and patient studies (R=0.72). Moderate to poor correlation was found between image noise and tracking error with R -0.58 and -0.19 for both studies, respectively. Conclusion: An image acquisition frame rate of at least 4.29Hz is recommended for cine EPID tracking. Motion blurring in images with frame rates below 4.39Hz can substantially reduce the accuracy of auto-tracking. This work is supported in part by the Varian Medical Systems, Inc.« less
  • Purpose: To introduce a novel method for monitoring tumor location during stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) while the treatment beam is on by using a conventional electronic portal imaging device (EPID). Methods and Materials: In our clinic, selected patients were treated under a phase I institutional review board-approved SBRT protocol for limited hepatic metastases from solid tumors. Before treatment planning multiple gold fiducial markers were implanted on the periphery of the tumor. During treatment the EPID was used in cine mode to collect the exit radiation and produce a sequence of images for each field. An in-house program was developed formore » calculating the location of the fiducials and their relative distance to the planned locations. Results: Three case studies illustrate the utility of the technique. Patient A exhibited a systematic shift of 4 mm during one of the treatment beams. Patient B showed an inferior drift of the target of approximately 1 cm from the time of setup to the end of the fraction. Patient C had a poor setup on the first day of treatment that was quantified and accounted for on subsequent treatment days. Conclusions: Target localization throughout each treatment beam can be quickly assessed with the presented technique. Treatment monitoring with an EPID in cine mode is shown to be a clinically feasible and useful tool.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate setup error and interfractional changes in tumor motion magnitude using an electric portal imaging device in cine mode (EPID cine) during the course of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and to calculate margins to compensate for these variations. Materials and Methods: Subjects were 28 patients with Stage I NSCLC who underwent SBRT. Respiratory-correlated four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) at simulation was binned into 10 respiratory phases, which provided average intensity projection CT data sets (AIP). On 4D-CT, peak-to-peak motion of the tumor (M-4DCT) in the craniocaudal direction was assessed and the tumor centermore » (mean tumor position [MTP]) of the AIP (MTP-4DCT) was determined. At treatment, the tumor on cone beam CT was registered to that on AIP for patient setup. During three sessions of irradiation, peak-to-peak motion of the tumor (M-cine) and the mean tumor position (MTP-cine) were obtained using EPID cine and in-house software. Based on changes in tumor motion magnitude ( Increment M) and patient setup error ( Increment MTP), defined as differences between M-4DCT and M-cine and between MTP-4DCT and MTP-cine, a margin to compensate for these variations was calculated with Stroom's formula. Results: The means ({+-}standard deviation: SD) of M-4DCT and M-cine were 3.1 ({+-}3.4) and 4.0 ({+-}3.6) mm, respectively. The means ({+-}SD) of Increment M and Increment MTP were 0.9 ({+-}1.3) and 0.2 ({+-}2.4) mm, respectively. Internal target volume-planning target volume (ITV-PTV) margins to compensate for Increment M, Increment MTP, and both combined were 3.7, 5.2, and 6.4 mm, respectively. Conclusion: EPID cine is a useful modality for assessing interfractional variations of tumor motion. The ITV-PTV margins to compensate for these variations can be calculated.« less