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Title: SU-F-T-230: A Simple Method to Assess Accuracy of Dynamic Wave Arc Irradiation Using An Electronic Portal Imaging Device and Log Files

Abstract

Purpose: The Dynamic Wave Arc (DWA) technique, where the multi-leaf collimator (MLC) and gantry/ring move simultaneously in a predefined non-coplanar trajectory, has been developed on the Vero4DRT. The aim of this study is to develop a simple method for quality assurance of DWA delivery using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) measurements and log files analysis. Methods: The Vero4DRT has an EPID on the beam axis, the resolution of which is 0.18 mm/pixel at the isocenter plane. EPID images were acquired automatically. To verify the detection accuracy of the MLC position by EPID images, the MLC position with intentional errors was assessed. Tests were designed considering three factors: (1) accuracy of the MLC position (2) dose output consistency with variable dose rate (160–400 MU/min), gantry speed (2.4–6°/s), ring speed (0.5–2.5°/s), and (3) MLC speed (1.6–4.2 cm/s). All the patterns were delivered to the EPID and compared with those obtained with a stationary radiation beam with a 0° gantry angle. The irradiation log, including the MLC position and gantry/ring angle, were recorded simultaneously. To perform independent checks of the machine accuracy, the MLC position and gantry/ring angle position were assessed using log files. Results: 0.1 mm intentional error can be detectedmore » by the EPID, which is smaller than the EPID pixel size. The dose outputs with different conditions of the dose rate and gantry/ring speed and MLC speed showed good agreement, with a root mean square (RMS) error of 0.76%. The RMS error between the detected and recorded data were 0.1 mm for the MLC position, 0.12° for the gantry angle, and 0.07° for the ring angle. Conclusion: The MLC position and dose outputs in variable conditions during DWA irradiation can be easily detected using EPID measurements and log file analysis. The proposed method is useful for routine verification. This research is (partially) supported by the Practical Research for Innovative Cancer Control (15Ack0106151h0001) from Japan Agency for Medical Research and development, AMED. Authors Takashi Mizowaki and Masahiro Hiraoka have consultancy agreement with Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Japan.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. Kyoto University, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto, Kyoto (Japan)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22648846
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; ACCURACY; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; DOSE RATES; EQUIPMENT; ERRORS; IMAGES; IRRADIATION; QUALITY ASSURANCE

Citation Formats

Hirashima, H, Miyabe, Y, Yokota, K, Nakamura, M, Mukumoto, N, Mizowaki, T, and Hiraoka, M. SU-F-T-230: A Simple Method to Assess Accuracy of Dynamic Wave Arc Irradiation Using An Electronic Portal Imaging Device and Log Files. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4956369.
Hirashima, H, Miyabe, Y, Yokota, K, Nakamura, M, Mukumoto, N, Mizowaki, T, & Hiraoka, M. SU-F-T-230: A Simple Method to Assess Accuracy of Dynamic Wave Arc Irradiation Using An Electronic Portal Imaging Device and Log Files. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956369.
Hirashima, H, Miyabe, Y, Yokota, K, Nakamura, M, Mukumoto, N, Mizowaki, T, and Hiraoka, M. Wed . "SU-F-T-230: A Simple Method to Assess Accuracy of Dynamic Wave Arc Irradiation Using An Electronic Portal Imaging Device and Log Files". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956369.
@article{osti_22648846,
title = {SU-F-T-230: A Simple Method to Assess Accuracy of Dynamic Wave Arc Irradiation Using An Electronic Portal Imaging Device and Log Files},
author = {Hirashima, H and Miyabe, Y and Yokota, K and Nakamura, M and Mukumoto, N and Mizowaki, T and Hiraoka, M},
abstractNote = {Purpose: The Dynamic Wave Arc (DWA) technique, where the multi-leaf collimator (MLC) and gantry/ring move simultaneously in a predefined non-coplanar trajectory, has been developed on the Vero4DRT. The aim of this study is to develop a simple method for quality assurance of DWA delivery using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) measurements and log files analysis. Methods: The Vero4DRT has an EPID on the beam axis, the resolution of which is 0.18 mm/pixel at the isocenter plane. EPID images were acquired automatically. To verify the detection accuracy of the MLC position by EPID images, the MLC position with intentional errors was assessed. Tests were designed considering three factors: (1) accuracy of the MLC position (2) dose output consistency with variable dose rate (160–400 MU/min), gantry speed (2.4–6°/s), ring speed (0.5–2.5°/s), and (3) MLC speed (1.6–4.2 cm/s). All the patterns were delivered to the EPID and compared with those obtained with a stationary radiation beam with a 0° gantry angle. The irradiation log, including the MLC position and gantry/ring angle, were recorded simultaneously. To perform independent checks of the machine accuracy, the MLC position and gantry/ring angle position were assessed using log files. Results: 0.1 mm intentional error can be detected by the EPID, which is smaller than the EPID pixel size. The dose outputs with different conditions of the dose rate and gantry/ring speed and MLC speed showed good agreement, with a root mean square (RMS) error of 0.76%. The RMS error between the detected and recorded data were 0.1 mm for the MLC position, 0.12° for the gantry angle, and 0.07° for the ring angle. Conclusion: The MLC position and dose outputs in variable conditions during DWA irradiation can be easily detected using EPID measurements and log file analysis. The proposed method is useful for routine verification. This research is (partially) supported by the Practical Research for Innovative Cancer Control (15Ack0106151h0001) from Japan Agency for Medical Research and development, AMED. Authors Takashi Mizowaki and Masahiro Hiraoka have consultancy agreement with Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Japan.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4956369},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
  • Purpose: To develop an accurate, straightforward, and user-independent method for performing light versus radiation field coincidence quality assurance utilizing EPID images, a simple phantom made of readily-accessible materials, and a free software program. Methods: A simple phantom consisting of a blocking tray, graph paper, and high-density wire was constructed. The phantom was used to accurately set the size of a desired light field and imaged on the electronic portal imaging device (EPID). A macro written for use in ImageJ, a free image processing software, was then use to determine the radiation field size utilizing the high density wires on themore » phantom for a pixel to distance calibration. The macro also performs an analysis on the measured radiation field utilizing the tolerances recommended in the AAPM Task Group #142. To verify the accuracy of this method, radiochromic film was used to qualitatively demonstrate agreement between the film and EPID results, and an additional ImageJ macro was used to quantitatively compare the radiation field sizes measured both with the EPID and film images. Results: The results of this technique were benchmarked against film measurements, which have been the gold standard for testing light versus radiation field coincidence. The agreement between this method and film measurements were within 0.5 mm. Conclusion: Due to the operator dependency associated with tracing light fields and measuring radiation fields by hand when using film, this method allows for a more accurate comparison between the light and radiation fields with minimal operator dependency. Removing the need for radiographic or radiochromic film also eliminates a reoccurring cost and increases procedural efficiency.« less
  • Purpose: To investigate the clinical utility of on-line verification of respiratory gated VMAT dosimetry during treatment. Methods: Portal dose images were acquired during treatment in integrated mode on a Varian TrueBeam (v. 1.6) linear accelerator for gated lung and liver patients that used flattening filtered beams. The source to imager distance (SID) was set to 160 cm to ensure imager clearance in case the isocenter was off midline. Note that acquisition of integrated images resulted in no extra dose to the patient. Fraction 1 was taken as baseline and all portal dose images were compared to that of the baseline,more » where the gamma comparison and dose difference were used to measure day-to-day exit dose variation. All images were analyzed in the Portal Dosimetry module of Aria (v. 10). The portal imager on the TrueBeam was calibrated by following the instructions for dosimetry calibration in service mode, where we define 1 calibrated unit (CU) equal to 1 Gy for 10×10 cm field size at 100 cm SID. This reference condition was measured frequently to verify imager calibration. Results: The gamma value (3%, 3 mm, 5% threshold) ranged between 92% and 100% for the lung and liver cases studied. The exit dose can vary by as much as 10% of the maximum dose for an individual fraction. The integrated images combined with the information given by the corresponding on-line soft tissue matched cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images were useful in explaining dose variation. For gated lung treatment, dose variation was mainly due to the diaphragm position. For gated liver treatment, the dose variation was due to both diaphragm position and weight loss. Conclusion: Integrated images can be useful in verifying dose delivery consistency during respiratory gated VMAT, although the CBCT information is needed to explain dose differences due to anatomical changes.« less
  • Purpose: Patient specific pre-treatment quality assurance (QA) using arrays of detectors or film have been the standard approach to assure the correct treatment is delivered to the patient. This QA approach is expensive, labor intensive and does not guarantee or document that all remaining fractions were treated properly. The purpose of this abstract is to commission and evaluate the performance of a commercially available in-vivo QA software using the electronic portal imaging device (EPID) to record the daily treatments. Methods: The platform EPIgray V2.0.2 (Dosisoft), which machine model compares ratios of TMR with EPID signal to predict dose was commissionedmore » for an Artiste (Siemens Oncology Care Systems) and a Truebeam (Varian medical systems) linear accelerator following the given instructions. The systems were then tested on three different phantoms (homogeneous stack of solid water, anthropomorphic head and pelvis) and on a library of patient cases. Simple and complex fields were delivered at different exposures and for different gantry angles. The effects of the table attenuation and the EPID sagging were evaluated. Gamma analysis of the measured dose was compared to the predicted dose for complex clinical IMRT cases. Results: Commissioning of the EPIgray system for two photon energies took 8 hours. The difference between the dose planned and the dose measured with EPIgray was better than 3% for all phantom scenarios tested. Preliminary results on patients demonstrate an accuracy of 5% is achievable in high dose regions for both 3DCRT and IMRT. Large discrepancies (>5%) were observed due to metallic structures or air cavities and in low dose areas. Flat panel sagging was visible and accounted for in the EPIgray model. Conclusion: The accuracy achieved by EPIgray is sufficient to document the safe delivery of complex IMRT treatments. Future work will evaluate EPIgray for VMAT and high dose rate deliveries. This work is supported by Dosisoft, Cachan, France.« less
  • Purpose: To implement and validate a method of using electronic portal image device (EPID) for pre-treatment quality assurance (QA) of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans using flattering filter free (FFF) beams for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods: On Varian Edge with 6MV FFF beam, open field (from 2×2 cm to 20×20 cm) EPID images were acquired with 200 monitor unit (MU) at the image device to radiation source distance of 150cm. With 10×10 open field and calibration unit (CU) provided by vendor to EPID image pixel, a dose conversion factor was determined by dividing the center dose calculated frommore » the treatment planning system (TPS) to the corresponding CU readout on the image. Water phantom measured beam profile and the output factors for various field sizes were further correlated to those of EPID images. The dose conversion factor and correction factors were then used for converting the portal images to the planner dose distributions of clinical fields. A total of 28 VMAT fields of 14 SBRT plans (8 lung, 2 prostate, 2 liver and 2 spine) were measured. With 10% low threshold cutoff, the delivered dose distributions were compared to the reference doses calculated in water phantom from the TPS. A gamma index analysis was performed for the comparison in percentage dose difference/distance-to-agreement specifications. Results: The EPID device has a linear response to the open fields with increasing MU. For the clinical fields, the gamma indices between the converted EPID dose distributions and the TPS calculated 2D dose distributions were 98.7%±1.1%, 94.0%±3.4% and 70.3%±7.7% for the criteria of 3%/3mm, 2%/2mm and 1%/1mm, respectively. Conclusion: Using a portal image device, a high resolution and high accuracy portal dosimerty was achieved for pre-treatment QA verification for SBRT VMAT plans with FFF beams.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of transit dose, measured with an electronic portal imaging device (EPID), in verifying actual dose delivery to patients. Methods: Plans of 5 patients with lung cancer, who received IMRT treatment, were examined using homogeneous solid water phantom and inhomogeneous anthropomorphic phantom. To simulate error in patient positioning, the anthropomorphic phantom was displaced from 5 mm to 10 mm in the inferior to superior (IS), superior to inferior (SI), left to right (LR), and right to left (RL) directions. The transit dose distribution was measured with EPID and was compared to the planed dose using gammamore » index. Results: Although the average passing rate based on gamma index (GI) with a 3% dose and a 3 mm distance-to-dose agreement tolerance limit was 94.34 % for the transit dose with homogeneous phantom, it was reduced to 84.63 % for the transit dose with inhomogeneous anthropomorphic phantom. The Result also shows that the setup error of 5mm (10mm) in IS, SI, LR and SI direction can Result in the decrease in values of GI passing rates by 1.3% (3.0%), 2.2% (4.3%), 5.9% (10.9%), and 8.9% (16.3%), respectively. Conclusion: Our feasibility study suggests that the transit dose-based quality assurance may provide information regarding accuracy of dose delivery as well as patient positioning.« less