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Title: SU-F-T-223: Radiotherapy Incident Reporting and Analysis System (RIRAS):Early Experience

Abstract

Background & Purpose: RIRAS is a web-based information system deployed on the Veterans Health Administration intranet in early 2014 to collect adverse events and good catch data; analyze the causes and contributing factors; and find ways to prevent future occurrences. Material and Methods: Incident learning consists of a feedback loop which starts with reporting an event, followed by analysis of contributing factors, and culminates in the development of a patient safety work product (PSWP) to prevent recurrence. RIRAS permits both anonymous and non-anonymous reporting. Each report is analyzed by a team of medical physicists who are independent of the reporting facility. The analysts usually contact the reporting facilities for additional information. We analyzed all reports and held telephonic interviews (when necessary) with the reporters. We then generated PSWPs with corrective/preventive and learning actions. Anonymous reporting is handled in the same manner, except without the ability to further interview the reporter. Results: In a significant number of reports, the causes and recommended preventive actions were considerably altered by the independent analysis and additional information from the facility. 130 reports have been entered in RIRAS; 9 misadministrations, 83 good catches, 3 anonymous good catches, and 35 earlier reported incidents from FY2005-14. 45%more » of the reported incidents occurred in the treatment delivery stages, 19% in on-treatment management, and 16% in pre-treatment verification. 80% of the good catches were found in the treatment delivery workflow. Majority of these incidents were due to inconsistent patient setup instructions or documentation, nonadherence to policies and procedures, lax time-out policy, distracted RTTs, and inadequate RTT staffing. Conclusion: RIRAS has identified many areas for improvement and elevated the quality and safety of radiation treatments in the VHA. We found that the ability to learn is significantly diminished when the analysts do not have the ability to request additional information.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1]; ;  [2]
  1. National Radiation Oncology Program (10P4H), Dept. of Veterans Affairs, Richmond, VA (United States)
  2. National Health Physics Program (10P4X), Dept. of Veterans Affairs, Little Rock, AR (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22648840
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; ACCIDENTS; DOCUMENTATION; FEEDBACK; INFORMATION SYSTEMS; LEARNING; LICENSES; PATIENTS; RADIOTHERAPY; SAFETY; VERIFICATION; WHO

Citation Formats

Kapoor, R, Palta, J, Hagan, M, Burkett, D, and Leidholdt, E. SU-F-T-223: Radiotherapy Incident Reporting and Analysis System (RIRAS):Early Experience. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4956362.
Kapoor, R, Palta, J, Hagan, M, Burkett, D, & Leidholdt, E. SU-F-T-223: Radiotherapy Incident Reporting and Analysis System (RIRAS):Early Experience. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956362.
Kapoor, R, Palta, J, Hagan, M, Burkett, D, and Leidholdt, E. 2016. "SU-F-T-223: Radiotherapy Incident Reporting and Analysis System (RIRAS):Early Experience". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956362.
@article{osti_22648840,
title = {SU-F-T-223: Radiotherapy Incident Reporting and Analysis System (RIRAS):Early Experience},
author = {Kapoor, R and Palta, J and Hagan, M and Burkett, D and Leidholdt, E},
abstractNote = {Background & Purpose: RIRAS is a web-based information system deployed on the Veterans Health Administration intranet in early 2014 to collect adverse events and good catch data; analyze the causes and contributing factors; and find ways to prevent future occurrences. Material and Methods: Incident learning consists of a feedback loop which starts with reporting an event, followed by analysis of contributing factors, and culminates in the development of a patient safety work product (PSWP) to prevent recurrence. RIRAS permits both anonymous and non-anonymous reporting. Each report is analyzed by a team of medical physicists who are independent of the reporting facility. The analysts usually contact the reporting facilities for additional information. We analyzed all reports and held telephonic interviews (when necessary) with the reporters. We then generated PSWPs with corrective/preventive and learning actions. Anonymous reporting is handled in the same manner, except without the ability to further interview the reporter. Results: In a significant number of reports, the causes and recommended preventive actions were considerably altered by the independent analysis and additional information from the facility. 130 reports have been entered in RIRAS; 9 misadministrations, 83 good catches, 3 anonymous good catches, and 35 earlier reported incidents from FY2005-14. 45% of the reported incidents occurred in the treatment delivery stages, 19% in on-treatment management, and 16% in pre-treatment verification. 80% of the good catches were found in the treatment delivery workflow. Majority of these incidents were due to inconsistent patient setup instructions or documentation, nonadherence to policies and procedures, lax time-out policy, distracted RTTs, and inadequate RTT staffing. Conclusion: RIRAS has identified many areas for improvement and elevated the quality and safety of radiation treatments in the VHA. We found that the ability to learn is significantly diminished when the analysts do not have the ability to request additional information.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4956362},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Purpose: This Web-based Radiotherapy Incident Reporting and Analysis System (RIRAS) is a tool to improve quality of care for radiation therapy patients. This system is an important facet of continuing effort by our community to maintain and improve safety of radiotherapy.Material and Methods: VA’s National Radiation Oncology Program office has embarked on a program to electronically collect adverse events and good-catch data of radiation treatment of over 25,000 veterans treated with radiotherapy annually. This VA-Intranet based software design has made use of dataset taxonomies and data dictionaries defined in AAPM/ASTRO reports on error reporting. We used proven industrial and medicalmore » event reporting techniques to avoid several common problems faced in effective data collection such as incomplete data due to data entry fatigue by the reporters, missing data due to data difficult to obtain or not familiar to most reporters, missing reports due to fear of reprisal etc. This system encompasses the entire feedback loop of reporting an incident, analyzing it for salient details, and developing interventions to prevent it from happening again. The analysis reports with corrective, learning actions are shared with the reporter/facility and made public to the community (after deidentification) as part of the learning process. Results: Till date 50 incident/good catches have been reported in RIRAS and we have completed analysis on 100% of these reports. This is done due to the fact that each reported incidents is investigated and a complete analysis/patient-safety-work-product report is generated by radiation oncology domain-experts. Conclusions Because of the completeness of the data, the system has enabled us to analyze process steps and track trends of major errors which in the future will lead to implementing system wide process improvement steps and safe standard operating procedures for each radiotherapy treatment modality/technique and fulfills our goal of “Effecting Quality While Treating Safely”. RIRAS developed and copyrighted by TSG Innovations Inc.« less
  • Purpose: To provide an overview of reported incidents that occurred in a radiology department and to describe the most common causal source of incidents. Methods: Incident reports from the radiology department at the University of the Ryukyus Hospital between 2008 and 2013 were collected and analyzed retrospectively. The incident report form contains the following items, causal factors of the incident and desirable corrective actions to prevent recurrence of similar incidents. These items allow the institution to investigate/analyze root causes of the incidents and suggest measures to be taken to prevent further, similar incidents. The ‘causal factors of the incident’ itemmore » comprises multiple selections from among 24 selections and includes some synonymous selections. In this study, this item was re-categorized into four causal source types: (i) carelessness, (ii) lack of skill or knowledge, (iii) deficiencies in communication, and (iv) external factors. Results: There were a total of 7490 incident reports over the study period and 276 (3.7%) were identified as originating from the radiology department. The most frequent causal source type was carelessness (62%). The other three types showed similar frequencies (10–14%). The staff members involved in incidents indicate three predominant desirable corrective actions to prevent or decrease the recurrence of similar incidents. These are ‘improvement in communication’ (24%), ‘staff training/education’ (19%), and ‘daily medical procedures’ (22%), and the most frequent was ‘improvement in communication’. Even though the most frequent causal factor was related to carelessness, the most desirable corrective action indicated by the staff members was related to communication. Conclusion: Our finding suggests that the most immediate causes are strongly related to carelessness. However, the most likely underlying causes of incidents would be related to deficiencies in effective communication. At our department, therefore, the primary action to prevent/reduce similar incidents should be ‘communication improvement’.« less
  • Between 1970 and 1981, 436 patients with T1 and small T2 breast carcinoma were treated by tumor excision followed by radiotherapy at the Institut Gustave-Roussy. The mean follow-up was 5 years, with 50% of patients followed 5 years. Twenty-four patients have experienced a local-regional (LR) relapse for an actuarial LR control rate of 93% at 5 years and 90% at 10 years. Potential prognostic factors for all 24 local-regional recurrences and for the subgroup with relapses in the breast were analyzed. A high Bloom grade and a low Nominal Standard Dose (NSD) were significant prognostic factors for predicting LR relapsemore » in both groups. This paper describes the natural history of breast cancer following a local-regional relapse in irradiated patients without mastectomy. Most importantly, the authors observed that breast relapses following radiotherapy become clinically apparent more slowly than chest wall failures after mastectomy, and if detected early, that these patients may be successfully retreated.« less
  • Purpose: To review the role of radiotherapy (RTx) alone in patients with Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC). Methods and Materials: The records of 43 patients with MCC treated with RTx alone between 1993 and 2007 at the Westmead and Royal Brisbane/Mater Hospitals, Australia, were reviewed. Multivariate analysis was performed by use of Cox regression analysis. Results: The median age was 79 years (range, 48-91 years) in 19 women (44%) and 24 men (56%). All patients were white, and 5 (12%) had immunosuppression. A majority (56%) underwent irradiation at initial diagnosis, with the remainder (44%) treated in the relapse setting. The medianmore » duration of follow-up was 39 months. The head and neck comprised the most frequently treated site (47%). The median maximum lesion size was 30 mm (range, 5-130 mm). Relapse developed in 60% of patients, with most being out-of-field relapses. The in-field control rate was 75%. Most out-of-field relapses were to visceral organs. Relapse developed outside the irradiated field in 53% of patients. On multivariate analysis, only nodal status (negative nodes vs. nodes present) was significantly associated with relapse-free survival, with p = 0.005 (hazard ratio, 0.25; 95% confidence interval, 0.96-0.663). Overall survival at 2 and 5 years was 58% and 37%, respectively. Conclusions: Patients with MCC treated with RTx have a high likelihood of obtaining in-field control. Doses of 50 to 55 Gy in 20 to 25 fractions are recommended. A minority of patients are cured, with many dying of systemic relapse. Lower dose fractionation schedules (e.g., 25 Gy in 5 fractions) may be considered in patients with a very poor performance status.« less
  • Purpose: Describe a Web-based Radiation Oncology Incident Reporting and Learning system that has the potential to improve quality of care for radiation therapy patients. This system is an important facet of continuing effort by our community to maintain and improve safety of radiotherapy.Material and Methods: The VA National Radiation Oncology Program office has embarked on a program to electronically collect adverse events and near miss data of radiation treatment of over 25,000 veterans treated with radiotherapy annually. Software used for this program is deployed on the VAs intranet as a Website. All data entry forms (adverse event or near missmore » reports, work product reports) utilize standard causal, RT process step taxonomies and data dictionaries defined in AAPM and ASTRO reports on error reporting (AAPM Work Group Report on Prevention of Errors and ASTROs safety is no accident report). All reported incidents are investigated by the radiation oncology domain experts. This system encompasses the entire feedback loop of reporting an incident, analyzing it for salient details, and developing interventions to prevent it from happening again. The operational workflow is similar to that of the Aviation Safety Reporting System. This system is also synergistic with ROSIS and SAFRON. Results: The ROIRLS facilitates the collection of data that help in tracking adverse events and near misses and develop new interventions to prevent such incidents. The ROIRLS electronic infrastructure is fully integrated with each registered facility profile data thus minimizing key strokes and multiple entries by the event reporters. Conclusions: OIRLS is expected to improve the quality and safety of a broad spectrum of radiation therapy patients treated in the VA and fulfills our goal of Effecting Quality While Treating Safely The Radiation Oncology Incident Reporting and Learning System software used for this program has been developed, conceptualized and maintained by TSG Innovations Inc. and is deployed on the VA intranet as a Website. The Radiation Oncology Incident Reporting and Learning System software used for this program has been developed, conceptualized and maintained by TSG Innovations Inc. and is deployed on the VA intranet as a Website.« less