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Title: Balloon-Occluded Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration of a Gastric Vascular Malformation: An Innovative Approach to Treatment of a Rare Condition

Abstract

Arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are a high-flow form of a vascular malformation, which can be found anywhere in the body. While historically treated surgically, a multidisciplinary approach utilizing multiple specialties and treatment modalities is now commonly employed. In order to effectively treat an AVM, the nidus must be targeted and eradicated, which can be done via multiple approaches. We present the case of a 43-year-old male with a gastric wall AVM, which was initially incompletely treated using a percutaneous transarterial approach. The gastric AVM was noted to have dominant drainage through a gastrorenal shunt; therefore, Balloon-occluded Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration (BRTO) was utilized to eradicate the AVM nidus. This case illustrates the utility of Interventional Radiology, specifically BRTO, as another treatment option for challenging AVMs.

Authors:
 [1]; ; ;  [2]
  1. Naval Medical Center Portsmouth, Transitional Year/Graduate Medical Education Department, Medical Corps, United States Navy (United States)
  2. Naval Medical Center Portsmouth, Radiology Department, Medical Corps, United States Navy (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22645346
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology; Journal Volume: 40; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2017 Springer Science+Business Media New York and the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe (CIRSE); Article Copyright (c) 2016 Springer Science+Business Media New York and the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe (CIRSE) (outside the USA); http://www.springer-ny.com; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; BALLOONS; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; BYPASSES; DRAINAGE; MALFORMATIONS; SURGERY

Citation Formats

Hansing, Catherine E., E-mail: catherine.e.hansing.mil@mail.mil, Marquardt, Joseph P., Sutton, Daniel M., and York, John D. Balloon-Occluded Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration of a Gastric Vascular Malformation: An Innovative Approach to Treatment of a Rare Condition. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1007/S00270-016-1470-7.
Hansing, Catherine E., E-mail: catherine.e.hansing.mil@mail.mil, Marquardt, Joseph P., Sutton, Daniel M., & York, John D. Balloon-Occluded Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration of a Gastric Vascular Malformation: An Innovative Approach to Treatment of a Rare Condition. United States. doi:10.1007/S00270-016-1470-7.
Hansing, Catherine E., E-mail: catherine.e.hansing.mil@mail.mil, Marquardt, Joseph P., Sutton, Daniel M., and York, John D. Wed . "Balloon-Occluded Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration of a Gastric Vascular Malformation: An Innovative Approach to Treatment of a Rare Condition". United States. doi:10.1007/S00270-016-1470-7.
@article{osti_22645346,
title = {Balloon-Occluded Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration of a Gastric Vascular Malformation: An Innovative Approach to Treatment of a Rare Condition},
author = {Hansing, Catherine E., E-mail: catherine.e.hansing.mil@mail.mil and Marquardt, Joseph P. and Sutton, Daniel M. and York, John D.},
abstractNote = {Arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are a high-flow form of a vascular malformation, which can be found anywhere in the body. While historically treated surgically, a multidisciplinary approach utilizing multiple specialties and treatment modalities is now commonly employed. In order to effectively treat an AVM, the nidus must be targeted and eradicated, which can be done via multiple approaches. We present the case of a 43-year-old male with a gastric wall AVM, which was initially incompletely treated using a percutaneous transarterial approach. The gastric AVM was noted to have dominant drainage through a gastrorenal shunt; therefore, Balloon-occluded Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration (BRTO) was utilized to eradicate the AVM nidus. This case illustrates the utility of Interventional Radiology, specifically BRTO, as another treatment option for challenging AVMs.},
doi = {10.1007/S00270-016-1470-7},
journal = {Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology},
number = 2,
volume = 40,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Feb 15 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Wed Feb 15 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}
  • PurposeTo compare the clinical outcomes of balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (BRTO) using ethanolamine oleate (EO), BRTO using sodium tetradecyl sulfate (STS) foam, and vascular plug-assisted retrograde transvenous obliteration (PARTO).Materials and MethodsFrom April 2004 to February 2015, ninety-five patients underwent retrograde transvenous obliteration for gastric varices were analyzed retrospectively. BRTO with EO was performed in 49 patients, BRTO with STS foam in 25, and PARTO in 21. Among them, we obtained follow-up data in 70 patients. Recurrence of gastric varices was evaluated by follow-up endoscopy or CT. Medical records were reviewed for the clinical efficacy. Statistical analyses were performed by Kaplan–Meiermore » method, Chi-square, Fisher’s, and Kruskal–Wallis tests.ResultsTechnical and clinical success was 94.7 %. As major complications, a hemoglobinuria and a death due to disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) were occurred in two patients with BRTO using EO. Recurrence occurred more frequently in PARTO group (P < 0.05). Recurrence occurred in three patients in BRTO using EO group and four patients in PARTO group with 3.2 and 32.8 % of each expected 1-year recurrence rates. There was no recurrence in BRTO using STS group. Abdominal pain occurred more frequently in BRTO using EO than BRTO using STS foam and PARTO (P < 0.05). Procedure time of PARTO was shorter than two conventional BRTOs (P < 0.05).ConclusionsBRTO using STS foam or PARTO is better than BRTO using EO for treatment of gastric varices in terms of complication or procedure time. However, PARTO showed frequent recurrence of gastric varices during the long-term follow-up rather than BRTO.« less
  • We encountered a patient with gastric varix draining not via the usual left suprarenal vein but via the left inferior phrenic vein joining the left hepatic vein. Transfemoral balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (BRTO) of the varix was performed under balloon occlusion of the left inferior phrenic vein via the left hepatic vein and retrograde injection of the sclerosing agent (5% of ethanolamine oleate) into the gastric varix. Disappearance of the gastric varix was confirmed on endoscopic examination 2 months later.
  • Purpose: To evaluate the clinical feasibility of balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (BORTO) for gastric varices. Methods: BORTO was performed in 14 patients with gastric varices due to liver cirrhosis. The gastric varices were confirmed by endoscopy, and their feeding and draining veins were identified by contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) and angiography. A 6 Fr Simmons-shaped balloon catheter was inserted into the gastrorenal shunt. The balloon was inflated, and 5% ethanolamine oleate iopamidol was infused slowly through the catheter. Patients were followed up with endoscopy and enhanced CT at 1 week, 1, 3, and 6 months after the procedure and everymore » 6 months thereafter. Results: The gastric varices completely disappeared in 12 of 14 patients and was partially resolved in the remaining 2 patients. Neither a recurrence nor an aggravation of gastric varices were found. No major complications were experienced. Conclusion: BORTO is a safe and effective treatment for gastric varices.« less
  • A 66-year-old woman with a gastric varix, draining into a dilated left adrenal vein and a left inferior phrenic vein, was treated with dual balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (B-RTO). Under balloon occlusion of the left adrenal vein and the left inferior phrenic vein, retrograde injection of a sclerosant (5% ethanolamine oleate) into the gastric varix was performed. Two weeks later, disappearance of flow in the gastric varix was confirmed on endoscopic ultrasound examination.
  • We report two cases of gastric varices complicated by massive ascites that disappeared after balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (B-RTO). The first patient had progressive gastric varices that continued to enlarge even after three episodes of esophagogastric variceal bleeding, and the second patient was admitted to our hospital because of the bleeding from gastric varices. After B-RTO procedures in both patients, significant improvement of the ascites, hepatic function reserve, and hypoalbuminemia was observed. Although further experience is needed, our experience points to the likelihood of the amelioration of ascites after B-RTO.