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Title: Review of the Clinical Evidence for the Use of DEBIRI in the Treatment of Colorectal Metastatic Disease

Abstract

Colorectal cancer is a common malignancy that most commonly metastasizes to the liver. There has been considerable effort in developing new treatment options for these patients. One method that has been developed for the treatment of colorectal metastases to the liver is irinotecan-loaded drug-eluting bead (DEBIRI) embolization. This article reviews the current literature on DEBIRI and discusses the state of current knowledge and possible areas of future investigation.

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. University of Minnesota, Department of Radiology, Division of Interventional Radiology (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22645245
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology; Journal Volume: 40; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2017 Springer Science+Business Media New York and the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe (CIRSE); http://www.springer-ny.com; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; DRUGS; LIVER; METASTASES; NEOPLASMS; PATIENTS; REVIEWS; VASCULAR DISEASES

Citation Formats

Young, Shamar, E-mail: youn1862@umn.edu, D’Souza, Donna, Flanagan, Siobhan, and Golzarian, Jafar. Review of the Clinical Evidence for the Use of DEBIRI in the Treatment of Colorectal Metastatic Disease. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1007/S00270-016-1537-5.
Young, Shamar, E-mail: youn1862@umn.edu, D’Souza, Donna, Flanagan, Siobhan, & Golzarian, Jafar. Review of the Clinical Evidence for the Use of DEBIRI in the Treatment of Colorectal Metastatic Disease. United States. doi:10.1007/S00270-016-1537-5.
Young, Shamar, E-mail: youn1862@umn.edu, D’Souza, Donna, Flanagan, Siobhan, and Golzarian, Jafar. Sat . "Review of the Clinical Evidence for the Use of DEBIRI in the Treatment of Colorectal Metastatic Disease". United States. doi:10.1007/S00270-016-1537-5.
@article{osti_22645245,
title = {Review of the Clinical Evidence for the Use of DEBIRI in the Treatment of Colorectal Metastatic Disease},
author = {Young, Shamar, E-mail: youn1862@umn.edu and D’Souza, Donna and Flanagan, Siobhan and Golzarian, Jafar},
abstractNote = {Colorectal cancer is a common malignancy that most commonly metastasizes to the liver. There has been considerable effort in developing new treatment options for these patients. One method that has been developed for the treatment of colorectal metastases to the liver is irinotecan-loaded drug-eluting bead (DEBIRI) embolization. This article reviews the current literature on DEBIRI and discusses the state of current knowledge and possible areas of future investigation.},
doi = {10.1007/S00270-016-1537-5},
journal = {Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology},
number = 4,
volume = 40,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Apr 15 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Sat Apr 15 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}
  • Purpose: We report the incidence of metastatic involvement of the limbic circuit in a retrospective review of patients treated at our institution. This review was performed to assess the feasibility of selectively sparing the limbic system during whole-brain radiotherapy and prophylactic cranial irradiation. Methods and Materials: We identified 697 intracranial metastases in 107 patients after reviewing contrast-enhanced CT and/or MR image sets for each patient. Lesions were localized to the limbic circuit or to the rest of the brain/brain stem. Patients were categorized by tumor histology (e.g., non-small-cell lung cancer, small-cell lung cancer, breast cancer, and other) and by totalmore » number of intracranial metastases (1-3, oligometastatic; 4 or more, nonoligometastatic). Results: Thirty-six limbic metastases (5.2% of all metastases) were identified in 22 patients who had a median of 16.5 metastases/patient (limbic metastases accounted for 9.9% of their lesions). Sixteen metastases (2.29%) involved the hippocampus, and 20 (2.86%) involved the rest of the limbic circuit; 86.2% of limbic metastases occurred in nonoligometastatic patients, and 13.8% occurred in oligometastatic patients. The incidence of limbic metastases by histologic subtype was similar. The incidence of limbic metastases in oligometastatic patients was 4.9% (5/103): 0.97%, hippocampus; 3.9%, remainder of the limbic circuit. One of 53 oligometastatic patients (1.9%) had hippocampal metastases, while 4/53 (7.5%) had other limbic metastases. Conclusions: Metastatic involvement of the limbic circuit is uncommon and limited primarily to patients with nonoligometastatic disease, supporting our hypothesis that it is reasonable to selectively exclude or reduce the dose to the limbic circuit when treating patients with prophylactic cranial irradiation or whole-brain radiotherapy for oligometastatic disease not involving these structures.« less
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