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Title: Percutaneous Cementoplasty for Kienbock’s Disease

Abstract

Kienböck disease typically presents with wrist pain, swelling, restricted range of motion, and difficulty in performing activities of daily living. Because the etiology and evolution of disease remain unclear, broad ranges of treatments have been designed. Percutaneous cementoplasty is expanding its role for managing painful bone metastases outside the spine. We can draw a parallel between lytic tumoral lesions and Kienbock’s disease. Increasing the strength and rigidity of lunate with cementoplasty can prevent it from collapse, relieve the symptoms associated with the process of avascular necrosis, and increase the wrist range of motion. We report the case of 30-year-old man with a painful stage IIIA Kienböck disease who underwent percutaneous cementoplasty and experienced immediate effective pain relief and recovery of wrist mobility.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [1];  [5]
  1. Hospital Príncipe de Asturias, Vascular and Interventional Radiology Unit (Spain)
  2. Fundación Jimenez Diaz, Neurointerventional Radiology Unit (Spain)
  3. Memorial Sloan-Kettering Center, Vascular and Interventional Radiology Unit (United States)
  4. Hospital Príncipe de Asturias, Department of Orthopedic Surgery (Spain)
  5. Hospital Príncipe de Asturias, Radiology Unit (Spain)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22645207
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology; Journal Volume: 40; Journal Issue: 5; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2017 Springer Science+Business Media New York and the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe (CIRSE); http://www.springer-ny.com; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; METASTASES; NECROSIS; PAIN; SWELLING; VASCULAR DISEASES; VERTEBRAE

Citation Formats

Vallejo, Eduardo Crespo, E-mail: dreduardocrespo@gmail.com, Martinez-Galdámez, Mario, Martin, Ernesto Santos, Gregorio, Arturo Perera de, Gallego, Miriam Gamo, and Escobar, Angeles Ramirez. Percutaneous Cementoplasty for Kienbock’s Disease. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1007/S00270-017-1625-1.
Vallejo, Eduardo Crespo, E-mail: dreduardocrespo@gmail.com, Martinez-Galdámez, Mario, Martin, Ernesto Santos, Gregorio, Arturo Perera de, Gallego, Miriam Gamo, & Escobar, Angeles Ramirez. Percutaneous Cementoplasty for Kienbock’s Disease. United States. doi:10.1007/S00270-017-1625-1.
Vallejo, Eduardo Crespo, E-mail: dreduardocrespo@gmail.com, Martinez-Galdámez, Mario, Martin, Ernesto Santos, Gregorio, Arturo Perera de, Gallego, Miriam Gamo, and Escobar, Angeles Ramirez. Mon . "Percutaneous Cementoplasty for Kienbock’s Disease". United States. doi:10.1007/S00270-017-1625-1.
@article{osti_22645207,
title = {Percutaneous Cementoplasty for Kienbock’s Disease},
author = {Vallejo, Eduardo Crespo, E-mail: dreduardocrespo@gmail.com and Martinez-Galdámez, Mario and Martin, Ernesto Santos and Gregorio, Arturo Perera de and Gallego, Miriam Gamo and Escobar, Angeles Ramirez},
abstractNote = {Kienböck disease typically presents with wrist pain, swelling, restricted range of motion, and difficulty in performing activities of daily living. Because the etiology and evolution of disease remain unclear, broad ranges of treatments have been designed. Percutaneous cementoplasty is expanding its role for managing painful bone metastases outside the spine. We can draw a parallel between lytic tumoral lesions and Kienbock’s disease. Increasing the strength and rigidity of lunate with cementoplasty can prevent it from collapse, relieve the symptoms associated with the process of avascular necrosis, and increase the wrist range of motion. We report the case of 30-year-old man with a painful stage IIIA Kienböck disease who underwent percutaneous cementoplasty and experienced immediate effective pain relief and recovery of wrist mobility.},
doi = {10.1007/S00270-017-1625-1},
journal = {Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology},
number = 5,
volume = 40,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon May 15 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon May 15 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}
  • The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of percutaneous cementoplasty (PC) with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) in painful extravertebral lytic bone metastases not responding to conventional therapy. Fifty patients (25 females), mean age 64.7 {+-} 11.2 years, underwent PC after giving informed consent. Procedures were performed under fluoroscopy (1/50) or combined fluoroscopy-CT (49/50) guidance in local anesthesia or under deep sedation in 7 patients with large metastases who underwent radiofrequency thermoablation (RFA) in the same session. Seventy lesions were treated (1-6 per patient; average, 1.4 {+-} 0.9), arranging in size from 1 to 10 cm (average, 3.6 {+-} 2.1more » cm). Mean volume of PMMA per lesion was 5.9 {+-} 3.2 ml (range, 1.5-15.0 ml). Pain was prospectively evaluated on an 11-point visual analog scale (VAS) before and after the procedure (follow-up, 15 to 36 months). Mean VAS score dropped from 9.1 {+-} 1.2 (range: 6-10) to 2.1 {+-} 2.5 (range: 0-9). Mean VAS difference was 7.0 {+-} 2.3 (range, 1-10; p < 0.0001, Wilcoxon signed rank test). Forty-seven of the 50 patients (94%) suspended narcotic drugs, in 22 (44%) pain was controlled with a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, in 25 (50%) analgesic therapy was suspended, and 13 of 50 (26%) had complete pain regression. In 3 of the 50 patients (6%) pain was not improved. No statistical difference between osteoplasty and osteoplasty plus RFA was found (p = 0.8338, Mann-Whitney test). No complications arose during the procedure. Two patients with metastases in the femoral diaphysis reported a fracture 1 month after treatment. PC is effective to obtain pain regression in painful bone metastases not responding to conventional analgesic therapy; bone consolidation cannot be obtained in the diaphysis of long weight-bearing bones.« less
  • PurposeTo compare the efficacy of percutaneous cementoplasty (PCP) with and without interventional internal fixation (IIF) on malignant impending pathological fracture of proximal femur.MethodsA total of 40 patients with malignant impending pathological fracture of proximal femur were selected for PCP and IIF (n = 19, group A) or PCP alone (n = 21, group B) in this non-randomized prospective study. Bone puncture needles were inserted into the proximal femur, followed by sequential installation of the modified trocar inner needles through the puncture needle sheath. Then, 15–45 ml cement was injected into the femur lesion.ResultsThe overall excellent and good pain relief rate during follow-ups were significantly highermore » in group A than that in group B (89 vs. 57 %, P = 0.034). The average change of VAS, ODI, KPS, and EFES in group A were significantly higher than those in group B at 1-, 3-, 6-month, 1-year (P < 0.05). Meanwhile, The stability of the treated femur was significantly higher in group A than that in group B (P < 0.05).ConclusionPCP and IIF were not only a safe and effective procedure, but resulted in greater pain relief, bone consolidation, and also reduced the risk of fracture than the currently recommended approach of PCP done on malignant proximal femoral tumor.« less
  • Atherosclerotic peripheral vascular disease (PVD) of the lower extremities deprives a person of the ability to exercise to their satisfaction, later of the ability to perform the activities of their daily life, and finally of their legs themselves. Peripheral vascular disease has long been managed by the vascular surgeon utilizing endarterectomy and peripheral arterial bypass. Patient acceptance of nonsurgical, percutaneous procedures such as percutaneous transluminal balloon angioplasty (PTA) is high. Increased utilization of these procedures has led to improved techniques and adjuncts to therapy, as well as more critical review of long-term results. This article will review the evaluation andmore » nonoperative management of PVD, with an emphasis on the newer modalities of management presently being investigated.« less
  • Purpose. To evaluate the clinical results of percutaneous transluminal rotational atherectomy in the treatment of peripheral vascular disease. Methods. Rotational atherectomy was performed in 39 patients aged 39-87 years (mean 66.6 years). A total of 71 lesions (43 stenoses and 28 occlusions) were treated in 40 limbs. Additional balloon angioplasty was required in 54% of lesions. Fifteen patients (37.5%) presented in Fontaine stage II, 10 patients (25%) in Fontaine stage III and 15 patients (37.5%) in Fontaine stage IV. Rotational atherectomy at 750 rpm was carried out over a 0.014-inch guidewire with continuous aspiration into a vacuum, bottle. Follow-up angiographymore » and color flow Doppler examinations were performed in 22 patients (23 limbs) after a mean period of 6 months (range 2-14 months). Results. There was one primary technical failure. In 36 of 40 lesions there was a good angiographic result with residual stenoses in less than 30%. In 70 lesions treated by rotational atherectomy, however, 54% showed residual stenoses of 30%-50% and these cases required additional balloon angioplasty. The mean ankle-brachial index improved significantly (p<0.001), from 0.49 before the procedure to 1.01 after the procedure. A single distal embolus, related to primary recanalization, occurred and there were two large inguinal hematomas. Cumulative clinical patency after 6 months was 83.8% and cumulative angiographic patency after 6 months was 79.1%. Conclusion. Percutaneous rotational atherectomy is a promising approach for the treatment of chronic peripheral vascular disease. Further prospective, randomized studies are necessary to compare percutaneous transluminal angioplasty with this new technical approach.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate the angiographic patterns of clinically manifest recurrent disease after infrainguinal percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) of stenoses and total occlusions. Methods: Among 326 infrainguinal PTAs on 263 consecutive patients, selective angiography was performed on 61 limbs of 52 patients 1-60 months after the primary intervention because of clinically suspected recurrent disease. Lesion-specific and patient-related factors were analyzed for 75 angiographically confirmed recurrent lesions in 57 limbs of 48 patients. Results: Recurrent disease was more frequently a stenosis when the original target lesion was a stenosis (92%, 44/48) than when the original lesion was a total occlusion (59%, 16/27;more » p < 0.001). When the original target lesion was a stenosis, the total length of the recurrent disease was longer than that of the original lesion [3.9 {+-} 3.9 cm (mean {+-} standard deviation) vs 2.8 {+-} 2.7 cm; p= 0.03], while in the subgroup of original total occlusions the length of the recurrent lesion was shorter than that of the original occlusion (7.1 {+-} 5.0 cm vs 9.9 {+-} 6.9 cm; p0.02). Half the restenoses (22/44) extended beyond one or both ends of the original stenosis and 38% (6/16) of the reocclusions extended beyond the distal end of the original occlusion. Conclusions: The type of recurrent disease depends on the original lesion type and the restenotic lesion frequently extends beyond one or both ends of the original target lesion.« less