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Title: SU-F-T-114: A Novel Anatomically Predictive Extension Model of Computational Human Phantoms for Dose Reconstruction in Retrospective Epidemiological Studies of Second Cancer Risks in Radiotherapy Patients

Abstract

Purpose: Recent advances in cancer treatments have greatly increased the likelihood of post-treatment patient survival. Secondary malignancies, however, have become a growing concern. Epidemiological studies determining secondary effects in radiotherapy patients require assessment of organ-specific dose both inside and outside the treatment field. An essential input for Monte Carlo modeling of particle transport is radiological images showing full patient anatomy. However, in retrospective studies it is typical to only have partial anatomy from CT scans used during treatment planning. In this study, we developed a multi-step method to extend such limited patient anatomy to full body anatomy for estimating dose to normal tissues located outside the CT scan coverage. Methods: The first step identified a phantom from a library of body size-dependent computational human phantoms by matching the height and weight of patients. Second, a Python algorithm matched the patient CT coverage location in relation to the whole body phantom. Third, an algorithm cut the whole body phantom and scaled them to match the size of the patient. Then, merged the two anatomies into one whole body. We entitled this new approach, Anatomically Predictive Extension (APE). Results: The APE method was examined by comparing the original chest-abdomen-pelvis CT images ofmore » the five patients with the APE phantoms developed from only the chest part of the CAP images and whole body phantoms. We achieved average percent differences of tissue volumes of 25.7%, 34.2%, 16.5%, 26.8%, and 31.6% with an average of 27% across all patients. Conclusion: Our APE method extends the limited CT patient anatomy to whole body anatomy by using image processing and computational human phantoms. Our ongoing work includes evaluating the accuracy of these APE phantoms by comparing normal tissue doses in the APE phantoms and doses calculated for the original full CAP images under generic radiotherapy simulations. This research was supported by the NIH Intramural Research Program.« less

Authors:
;  [1];  [2]; ;  [3]
  1. National Cancer Institute, Rockville, MD (United States)
  2. University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)
  3. East Carolina University Greenville, NC (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22642356
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; ANATOMY; ANIMAL TISSUES; CAT SCANNING; DOSES; IMAGE PROCESSING; MONTE CARLO METHOD; NEOPLASMS; PATIENTS; PHANTOMS; PLANT TISSUES; RADIOTHERAPY; SIMULATION

Citation Formats

Kuzmin, G, Lee, C, Lee, C, Pelletier, C, and Jung, J. SU-F-T-114: A Novel Anatomically Predictive Extension Model of Computational Human Phantoms for Dose Reconstruction in Retrospective Epidemiological Studies of Second Cancer Risks in Radiotherapy Patients. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4956250.
Kuzmin, G, Lee, C, Lee, C, Pelletier, C, & Jung, J. SU-F-T-114: A Novel Anatomically Predictive Extension Model of Computational Human Phantoms for Dose Reconstruction in Retrospective Epidemiological Studies of Second Cancer Risks in Radiotherapy Patients. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956250.
Kuzmin, G, Lee, C, Lee, C, Pelletier, C, and Jung, J. Wed . "SU-F-T-114: A Novel Anatomically Predictive Extension Model of Computational Human Phantoms for Dose Reconstruction in Retrospective Epidemiological Studies of Second Cancer Risks in Radiotherapy Patients". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956250.
@article{osti_22642356,
title = {SU-F-T-114: A Novel Anatomically Predictive Extension Model of Computational Human Phantoms for Dose Reconstruction in Retrospective Epidemiological Studies of Second Cancer Risks in Radiotherapy Patients},
author = {Kuzmin, G and Lee, C and Lee, C and Pelletier, C and Jung, J},
abstractNote = {Purpose: Recent advances in cancer treatments have greatly increased the likelihood of post-treatment patient survival. Secondary malignancies, however, have become a growing concern. Epidemiological studies determining secondary effects in radiotherapy patients require assessment of organ-specific dose both inside and outside the treatment field. An essential input for Monte Carlo modeling of particle transport is radiological images showing full patient anatomy. However, in retrospective studies it is typical to only have partial anatomy from CT scans used during treatment planning. In this study, we developed a multi-step method to extend such limited patient anatomy to full body anatomy for estimating dose to normal tissues located outside the CT scan coverage. Methods: The first step identified a phantom from a library of body size-dependent computational human phantoms by matching the height and weight of patients. Second, a Python algorithm matched the patient CT coverage location in relation to the whole body phantom. Third, an algorithm cut the whole body phantom and scaled them to match the size of the patient. Then, merged the two anatomies into one whole body. We entitled this new approach, Anatomically Predictive Extension (APE). Results: The APE method was examined by comparing the original chest-abdomen-pelvis CT images of the five patients with the APE phantoms developed from only the chest part of the CAP images and whole body phantoms. We achieved average percent differences of tissue volumes of 25.7%, 34.2%, 16.5%, 26.8%, and 31.6% with an average of 27% across all patients. Conclusion: Our APE method extends the limited CT patient anatomy to whole body anatomy by using image processing and computational human phantoms. Our ongoing work includes evaluating the accuracy of these APE phantoms by comparing normal tissue doses in the APE phantoms and doses calculated for the original full CAP images under generic radiotherapy simulations. This research was supported by the NIH Intramural Research Program.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4956250},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}