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Title: SU-F-T-100: Development and Implementation of a Treatment Planning Tracking System Into the Radiation Oncology Clinic

Abstract

Purpose: With increasing numbers of cancer patients being diagnosed and the complexity of radiotherapy treatments rising it’s paramount that patient plan development continues to stay fluid within the clinic. In order to maintain a high standard of care and clinical efficiency the establishment of a tracking system for patient plan development allows healthcare providers to view real time plan progression and drive clinical workflow. In addition, it provides statistical datasets which can further identify inefficiencies within the clinic. Methods: An application was developed utilizing Microsoft’s ODBC SQL database engine to track patient plan status throughout the treatment planning process while also managing key factors pertaining to the patient’s treatment. Pertinent information is accessible to staff in many locations, including tracking monitors within dosimetry, the clinic network for both computers and handheld devices, and through email notifications. Plans are initiated with a CT and continually tracked through planning stages until final approval by staff. Patient’s status is dynamically updated by the physicians, dosimetrists, and medical physicists based on the stage of the patient’s plan. Results: Our application has been running over a six month period with all patients being processed through the system. Modifications have been made to allow for newmore » features to be implemented along with additional tracking parameters. Based on in-house feedback, the application has been supportive in streamlining patient plans through the treatment planning process and data has been accumulating to further improve procedures within the clinic. Conclusion: Over time the clinic will continue to track data with this application. As data accumulates the clinic will be able to highlight inefficiencies within the workflow and adapt accordingly. We will add in new features to help support the treatment planning process in the future.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. University of Texas HSC SA, San Antonio, TX (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22642346
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; IMPLEMENTATION; PARTICLE TRACKS; PATIENTS; PLANNING; RADIOTHERAPY

Citation Formats

Kabat, C, Cline, K, Li, Y, Ha, C, and Stathakis, S. SU-F-T-100: Development and Implementation of a Treatment Planning Tracking System Into the Radiation Oncology Clinic. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4956236.
Kabat, C, Cline, K, Li, Y, Ha, C, & Stathakis, S. SU-F-T-100: Development and Implementation of a Treatment Planning Tracking System Into the Radiation Oncology Clinic. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956236.
Kabat, C, Cline, K, Li, Y, Ha, C, and Stathakis, S. Wed . "SU-F-T-100: Development and Implementation of a Treatment Planning Tracking System Into the Radiation Oncology Clinic". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956236.
@article{osti_22642346,
title = {SU-F-T-100: Development and Implementation of a Treatment Planning Tracking System Into the Radiation Oncology Clinic},
author = {Kabat, C and Cline, K and Li, Y and Ha, C and Stathakis, S},
abstractNote = {Purpose: With increasing numbers of cancer patients being diagnosed and the complexity of radiotherapy treatments rising it’s paramount that patient plan development continues to stay fluid within the clinic. In order to maintain a high standard of care and clinical efficiency the establishment of a tracking system for patient plan development allows healthcare providers to view real time plan progression and drive clinical workflow. In addition, it provides statistical datasets which can further identify inefficiencies within the clinic. Methods: An application was developed utilizing Microsoft’s ODBC SQL database engine to track patient plan status throughout the treatment planning process while also managing key factors pertaining to the patient’s treatment. Pertinent information is accessible to staff in many locations, including tracking monitors within dosimetry, the clinic network for both computers and handheld devices, and through email notifications. Plans are initiated with a CT and continually tracked through planning stages until final approval by staff. Patient’s status is dynamically updated by the physicians, dosimetrists, and medical physicists based on the stage of the patient’s plan. Results: Our application has been running over a six month period with all patients being processed through the system. Modifications have been made to allow for new features to be implemented along with additional tracking parameters. Based on in-house feedback, the application has been supportive in streamlining patient plans through the treatment planning process and data has been accumulating to further improve procedures within the clinic. Conclusion: Over time the clinic will continue to track data with this application. As data accumulates the clinic will be able to highlight inefficiencies within the workflow and adapt accordingly. We will add in new features to help support the treatment planning process in the future.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4956236},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
  • Purpose: A treatment planning process tracker database with input forms and a TV-viewable display webpage was developed and implemented in our clinic to collect time data points throughout the process. Tracking plan times is important because it directly affects the patient quality of care. Simply, the longer a patient waits after their initial simulation CT for treatment to begin, the more time the cancer has to progress. The tracker helps to drive workflow through the clinic, while the data collected can be used to understand and manage the process to find and eliminate inefficiencies. Methods: The overall process steps trackedmore » are CT-simulation, mark patient, draw normal contours, draw target volumes, create plan, and review/approve plan. Time stamps for task completion were extracted and used to generate a set of clinic metrics, among which include average time for each step in the process split apart by type of treatment, average time to completion for plans started in a given week, and individual overall completion time per plan. Results: Trends have been tracked for fourteen weeks of clinical data (196 plans). On average, drawing normal contours and target volumes is taking 2–5 times as long as creating the plan itself. This is potentially an issue because it could mean the process is taking too long initially, and it could be forcing the planning step to be done in a short amount of time. We also saw from our graphs that there appears to be no clear trend on the average amount of time per plan week-to-week. Conclusion: A tracker of this type has the potential to provide insight into how time is utilized in our clinic. By equipping our dosimetrists, radiation oncologists, and physicists with individualized metric sets, the tracker can help provide visibility and drive workflow. Funded in part by CPRIT (RP140105).« less
  • Purpose: To report the development and characterization of the first in-house gating system implemented with an optical tracking system (OTS) and the Elekta Response™ interface. Methods: The Response™ connects a patient tracking system with a linac, enabling the tracking system to control radiation delivery. The developed system uses an in-house OTS to monitor patient breathing. The OTS consists of two infrared-based cameras, tracking markers affixed on patient. It achieves gated or breath-held (BH) treatment by calling beam ON/OFF functions in the Response™ dynamic-link library (DLL). A 4D motion phantom was used to evaluate its dosimetric and time delay characteristics. Twomore » FF- and two FFF-IMRT beams were delivered in non-gated, BH and gated mode. The sinusoidal gating signal had a 6 sec period and 15 mm amplitude. The duty cycle included 10%, 20%, 30% and 50%. The BH signal was adapted from the sinusoidal wave by inserting 15 sec BHs. Each delivery was measured with a 2D diode array (MapCHECK™) and compared with the non-gated delivery using gamma analysis (3%). The beam ON/OFF time was captured using the service graphing utility of the linac. Results: The gated treatments were successfully delivered except the 10% duty cycle. The BH delivery had perfect agreement (100%) with non-gated delivery; the agreement of gated delivery decreased from 99% to 88% as duty cycle reduced from 50% to 20%. The beam on/off delay was on average 0.25/0.06 sec. The delivery time for the 50%, 30% and 20% duty cycle increased by 29%, 71% and 139%, respectively. No dosimetric or time delay difference was noticed between FF- and FFF-IMRT beams. Conclusion: The in-house gating system was successfully developed with dosimetric and time delay characteristics in line with published results for commercial systems. It will be an important platform for further research and clinical development of gated treatment.« less
  • Purpose: An open-source, convolution/superposition based kV-treatment planning system(TPS) was developed for small animal radiotherapy from previously existed in-house MV-TPS. It is flexible and applicable to both step and shoot and helical tomotherapy treatment delivery. For initial commissioning process, the dose calculation from kV-TPS was compared with measurements and Monte Carlo(MC) simulations. Methods: High resolution, low energy kernels were simulated using EGSnrc user code EDKnrc, which was used as an input in kV-TPS together with MC-simulated x-ray beam spectrum. The Blue Water™ homogeneous phantom (with film inserts) and heterogeneous phantom (with film and TLD inserts) were fabricated. Phantom was placed atmore » 100cm SSD, and was irradiated with 250 kVp beam for 10mins with 1.1cm × 1.1cm open field (at 100cm) created by newly designed binary micro-MLC assembly positioned at 90cm SSD. Gafchromic™ EBT3 film was calibrated in-phantom following AAPM TG-61 guidelines, and were used for measurement at 5 different depths in phantom. Calibrated TLD-100s were obtained from ADCL. EGS and MNCP5 simulation were used to model experimental irradiation set up calculation of dose in phantom. Results: Using the homogeneous phantom, dose difference between film and kV-TPS was calculated: mean(x)=0.9%; maximum difference(MD)=3.1%; standard deviation(σ)=1.1%. Dose difference between MCNP5 and kV-TPS was: x=1.5%; MD=4.6%; σ=1.9%. Dose difference between EGS and kV-TPS was: x=0.8%; MD=1.9%; σ=0.8%. Using the heterogeneous phantom, dose difference between film and kV-TPS was: x=2.6%; MD=3%; σ=1.1%; and dose difference between TLD and kV-TPS was: x=2.9%; MD=6.4%; σ=2.5%. Conclusion: The inhouse, open-source kV-TPS dose calculation system was comparable within 5% of measurements and MC simulations in both homogeneous and heterogeneous phantoms. The dose calculation system of the kV-TPS is validated as a part of initial commissioning process for small animal radiotherapy. The kV-TPS has the potential for accurate dose calculation for any kV treatment or imaging modalities.« less
  • Purpose: There is potentially a wide variation in plan quality for a certain disease site, even for clinics located in the same system of hospitals. We have used a prostate-specific knowledge-based planning (KBP) model as a quality control tool to investigate the variation in prostate treatment planning across a network of affiliated radiation oncology departments. Methods: A previously created KBP model was applied to 10 patients each from 4 community-based clinics (Clinics A, B, C, and D). The KBP model was developed using RapidPlan (Eclipse v13.5, Varian Medical Systems) from 60 prostate/prostate bed IMRT plans that were originally planned usingmore » an in-house treatment planning system at the central institution of the community-based clinics. The dosimetric plan quality (target coverage and normal-tissue sparing) of each model-generated plan was compared to the respective clinically-used plan. Each community-based clinic utilized the same planning goals to develop the clinically-used plans that were used at the main institution. Results: Across all 4 clinics, the model-generated plans decreased the mean dose to the rectum by varying amounts (on average, 12.5, 2.6, 4.5, and 2.7 Gy for Clinics A, B, C, and D, respectively). The mean dose to the bladder also decreased with the model-generated plans (5.4, 2.3, 3.0, and 4.1 Gy, respectively). The KBP model also identified that target coverage (D95%) improvements were possible for for Clinics A, B, and D (0.12, 1.65, and 2.75%) while target coverage decreased by 0.72% for Clinic C, demonstrating potentially different trade-offs made in clinical plans at different institutions. Conclusion: Quality control of dosimetric plan quality across a system of radiation oncology practices is possible with knowledge-based planning. By using a quality KBP model, smaller community-based clinics can potentially identify the areas of their treatment plans that may be improved, whether it be in normal-tissue sparing or improved target coverage. M. Matuszak has research funding for KBP from Varian Medical Systems.« less
  • Purpose: To commission the Brachytherapy Planning (BP) system (Varian, Palo Alto, CA) for the Collaborative Ocular Melanoma Study (COMS) eye plaques by evaluating dose differences against original plans from Nucletron Planning System (NPS). Methods: NPS system is the primary planning software for COMS-plaques at our facility; however, Brachytherapy Planning 11.0.47 (Varian Medical Systems) is used for secondary check and for seed placement configurations not originally commissioned. Dose comparisons of BP and NPS plans were performed for prescription of 8500 cGy at 5 mm depth and doses to normal structures: opposite retina, inner sclera, macula, optic disk and lens. Plans weremore » calculated for Iodine-125 seeds (OncoSeeds, Model 6711) using COMS-plaques of 10, 12, 14, 16, 18 and 20 mm diameters. An in-house program based on inverse-square was utilized to calculate point doses for comparison as well. Results: The highest dose difference between BP and NPS was 3.7% for the prescription point for all plaques. Doses for BP were higher than doses reported by NPS for all points. The largest percent differences for apex, opposite retina, inner sclera, macula, optic disk, and lens were 3.2%, 0.9%, 13.5%, 20.5%, 15.7% and 2.2%, respectively. The dose calculated by the in-house program was 1.3% higher at the prescription point, and were as high as 42.1%, for points away from the plaque (i.e. opposite retina) when compared to NPS. Conclusion: Doses to the tumor, lens, retina, and optic nerve are paramount for a successful treatment and vision preservation. Both systems are based on TG-43 calculations and assume water medium tissue homogeneity (ρe=1, water medium). Variations seen may result from the different task group versions and/or mathematical algorithms of the software. BP was commissioned to serve as a backup system and it also enables dose calculation in cases where seeds don’t follow conventional placement configuration.« less