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Title: SU-F-T-86: Electron Dosimetric Effects of Bolus and Lens Shielding in Treating Superficial Eye Lesions

Abstract

Purpose: Electron therapy for the treatment of ocular lymphomas requires the lens to be shielded to prevent secondary cataracts. This work evaluates the dosimetry under a suspended eyeshield with and without bolus for low energy electron fields. Methods: Film (GafChromic EBT3) dosimetry and relative output factors were measured for 6, 8, and 10 MeV electron energies. A customized 5 cm diameter circle electron orbital cutout was constructed for a 6×6 cm applicator with a lens shield, 1 cm diameter Cerrobend cylinder with 2.2 cm length, suspended from an XV film covering the open field. Relative output factors were measured using a Scanditronix electron diode in a solid water phantom. Depth dose profiles were collected for bolus thicknesses of 0, 3, and 5 mm in solid water at a source to surface distance (SSD) of 100 cm. These measurements were repeated in a Rando phantom. Results: At 5 mm, the approximate distance of the lens from the surface of the cornea, the estimated dose in solid water under the suspended lens shield was reduced to 16%, 14%, and 13% of the unblocked dose at the same depth, for electron energies of 6, 8, and 10 MeV, respectively. Applying bolus increased estimatedmore » doses under the block to 22% for 3-mm and 32% for 5-mm thicknesses for a 6 MeV incident electron beam. This effect is reduced for higher energies where the corresponding values were 15.5% and 18% for 3-mm and 5-mm for an 8 MeV electron beam. Conclusion: The application of bolus to treat superficial eye lesions of the conjunctiva increases lens dose at a depth of 5-mm under the shielding block with decreasing electron energy. Careful selection of electron energy is needed to account for electron scatter under the lens shield with the application of bolus in order to prevent cataracts.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2]; ;  [3]
  1. University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States)
  2. University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA (United States)
  3. University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22642334
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
07 ISOTOPES AND RADIATION SOURCES; CRYSTALLINE LENS; DEPTH DOSE DISTRIBUTIONS; ELECTRON BEAMS; ELECTRON DOSIMETRY; MEV RANGE 01-10; SHIELDING; SHIELDS; SOLIDS; WATER

Citation Formats

Young, L, Wootton, L, Gopan, O, and Liao, J. SU-F-T-86: Electron Dosimetric Effects of Bolus and Lens Shielding in Treating Superficial Eye Lesions. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4956222.
Young, L, Wootton, L, Gopan, O, & Liao, J. SU-F-T-86: Electron Dosimetric Effects of Bolus and Lens Shielding in Treating Superficial Eye Lesions. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956222.
Young, L, Wootton, L, Gopan, O, and Liao, J. Wed . "SU-F-T-86: Electron Dosimetric Effects of Bolus and Lens Shielding in Treating Superficial Eye Lesions". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956222.
@article{osti_22642334,
title = {SU-F-T-86: Electron Dosimetric Effects of Bolus and Lens Shielding in Treating Superficial Eye Lesions},
author = {Young, L and Wootton, L and Gopan, O and Liao, J},
abstractNote = {Purpose: Electron therapy for the treatment of ocular lymphomas requires the lens to be shielded to prevent secondary cataracts. This work evaluates the dosimetry under a suspended eyeshield with and without bolus for low energy electron fields. Methods: Film (GafChromic EBT3) dosimetry and relative output factors were measured for 6, 8, and 10 MeV electron energies. A customized 5 cm diameter circle electron orbital cutout was constructed for a 6×6 cm applicator with a lens shield, 1 cm diameter Cerrobend cylinder with 2.2 cm length, suspended from an XV film covering the open field. Relative output factors were measured using a Scanditronix electron diode in a solid water phantom. Depth dose profiles were collected for bolus thicknesses of 0, 3, and 5 mm in solid water at a source to surface distance (SSD) of 100 cm. These measurements were repeated in a Rando phantom. Results: At 5 mm, the approximate distance of the lens from the surface of the cornea, the estimated dose in solid water under the suspended lens shield was reduced to 16%, 14%, and 13% of the unblocked dose at the same depth, for electron energies of 6, 8, and 10 MeV, respectively. Applying bolus increased estimated doses under the block to 22% for 3-mm and 32% for 5-mm thicknesses for a 6 MeV incident electron beam. This effect is reduced for higher energies where the corresponding values were 15.5% and 18% for 3-mm and 5-mm for an 8 MeV electron beam. Conclusion: The application of bolus to treat superficial eye lesions of the conjunctiva increases lens dose at a depth of 5-mm under the shielding block with decreasing electron energy. Careful selection of electron energy is needed to account for electron scatter under the lens shield with the application of bolus in order to prevent cataracts.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4956222},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
  • Purpose: Large superficial (skin, soft tissue sarcoma) lesions located on curved areas are hard to treat with electrons. The Freiburg Flap (Nucletron, Netherlands) is a flexible mesh style surface which can be easily shaped to fit curved surfaces for reproducible HDR fraction delivery. To understand the fundamental dosimetric differences, a dosimetric comparison was made between HDR plesiotherapy (Freiburg applicator for lesions over 4cm) and external electron beam radiotherapy over cases with varying target curvature (both stylized and clinical cases). Methods: Four stylized cases with variable complexity were created using artificial DICOM axial CT slices and RT structures (a square andmore » three curved structures on a 4.5cm radius cylinder). They were planned using Oncentra v4.3 and exported to Pinnacle v9.6 for electrons planning. The HDR source dwell positions were optimized for the best coverage of the targets using graphical optimization. Electron treatment plans were created in Pinnacle using the same CT and RT structures of three HDR cases with surface lesions previously treated with the Freiburg flap. The En face electron plans used 6-12 MeV electrons and 0.5–1 cm bolus was added to increase surface dose. The electron plans were prescribed to an isodose line to conform to the target. Results: For all lesions, the average target dose coverage was similar (D90ave of 100% for HDR vs 101% for electrons). For lesions with high curvature, the HDR coverage was better (D90 102% vs D90 97% for electron). For all cases, adjacent structures high dose region was lower for HDR than electrons (D1cc 100% for HDR vs D1cc 111% for electrons). Conclusion: HDR plesiotherapy offers excellent target conformity for superficial targets similar to electrons. However, for lesions with complex curved surfaces, HDR has the advantage to achieve better dose distributions using graphical optimization to spare adjacent normal tissue while maximizing target coverage.« less
  • Purpose: Superficial soft x-ray applicators have recently been designed for use with existing intra-operative radiotherapy systems. These applicators may be used in treating superficial lesions which are conventionally treated with electron beams. The purpose of this abstract is to compare dose distributions of an intra-operative 50kV x-ray unit with low energy electrons for the treatment of superficial lesions. Methods: Dosimetric parameters for 1 and 3-cm diameter Intrabeam superficial x-ray applicators were measured with EBT3 Gafchromic film in a solid water phantom. Depth dose distributions and profiles (d=2, 5, 10 and 15mm) were obtained by prescribing a dose of 400cGy atmore » 5mm depth below the phantom surface. Corresponding dose profiles for 6-MeV electrons were acquired from a Varian Clinac 21EX at 100 SSD. H and D calibration curves were generated for each modality for 0-800cGy. Results: Dose coverage, penumbra, dose uniformity, surface dose, and dose fall-off were examined. Compared to electrons, Intrabeam lateral dose coverage at 5mm depth was 70% larger with a much sharper (1/4) penumbra. Electron isodose levels bulged with depth, whereas Intrabeam isodose levels exhibited a convex cone shape. The Intrabeam dose profiles demonstrated horns in the dose distribution up to a 5mm depth and an exponential dose fall-off. Relative surface dose was higher for the Intrabeam applicators. Treatment times were comparable for both modalities. Conclusions: The very small penumbra of Intrabeam at shallow depths could be useful in treating superficial lesions adjacent to critical structures. The exponential dose fall-off of Intrabeam makes it appealing in the sparing of structures beyond the lesion. However, for lesions past a depth of 5mm, electrons would be desirable as they penetrate farther and provide skin sparing. Intrabeam may be preferable for sites that are difficult to treat with electrons due to mechanical and physical limitations.« less
  • Purpose: Superficial lesions in the conjunctiva are frequently treated with en face electrons, using a hanging block to spare dose to the lens of the eye. Dose to the tumor and lens depend on the design and setup of the block and supporting apparatus. We performed in phantom measurements in order to characterize the dose sparing effects of the block as well as the under-dosing effect under the supporting apparatus for 6 MeV treatment. Methods: The commercial hanging block studied uses a 1.2 cm diameter tungsten cylinder supported by a 3 mm diameter acrylic rod. Point dose measurements under themore » hanging block, under an unblocked part of the field, and under the acrylic rod were performed using MOSFET detectors. In addition, EBT3 film was used for both PDD and profile measurements at a depth in phantom of 3 mm for both 105 and 103 cm SSD. Results: MOSFET measurements reported a dose reduction of 95% under the tungsten block when using an SSD of 103 cm, and 86% when using an SSD of 105 cm at a depth in phantom of 3 mm. Film measurements showed that the area under the acrylic rod may be under-dosed by as much as 30% when using 103 SSD. MOSFET measurements confirmed that when using an SSD of 103 cm, the area under the acrylic rod is under-dosed by up to 30% at 3mm depth, compared to the unblocked part of the field. Conclusion: The effectiveness of the commercial hanging block apparatus depends on setup, with 95% lens sparing possible with an SSD of 103 cm. This short SSD is necessary for sharp penumbra. At this SSD, substantial under-dosing under the acrylic support rod is possible. This must be mitigated with either feathering, or using an alternative method of support for the tungsten block.« less
  • Purpose: SBRT is proving to be a very efficacious treatment modality for an increasing number of indications, including spine lesions. We have developed a novel phantom to serve as an end-to-end QA tool for either patient specific QA or commissioning QA of SBRT for spine lesions. Methods: In this feasibility study, we have selected a patient with a single metastatic lesion in the L5 vertebral body. The patient’s CT simulation scan was used to develop a VMAT treatment plan delivering 18Gy to at least 90% of the target volume, following the guidelines of RTOG 0631. The treatment plan was developedmore » with the Pinnacle planning system using the adaptive convolution superposition calculation mode. The approved plan was re-calculated using the Monaco planning system. We performed a pseudo-in-vivo study whereby we manufactured two copies of a phantom to the exact shape and anatomy of the patient. The phantom was made from the CT images of the patient using a 3D printer with sub-millimeter accuracy. One phantom was filled with a gel dosimeter and the other was made with two ion chamber inserts to allow us to obtain point dose measurements in the target’s center and the spinal cord. Results: The prescribed dose of 18Gy was planned for the target while keeping the maximum spinal cord dose to less than 14Gy in 0.03cc of the cord. The VMAT plan was delivered to both the gel dosimeter filed phantom and the phantom with the ion chambers. The 3D gel dosimetry revealed a very good agreement between the monte carlo and measured point and volumetric dose. Conclusion: A patient like phantom was developed and validated for use as an end-to-end tool of dose verification for SBRT of spine lesions. We found that gel dosimetry is ideally suited to assess positional and dosimetric accuracy in 3D. RTsafe provided the phantoms and the gel dosimeter used for this study.« less
  • Purpose: The CyberKnife (CK) M6 Series introduced a mulitleaf collimator (MLC) beam for extending its capability to the conventional radiotherapy. This work is to investigate delivery efficiency of this system as compared to a standard Varian linac when treating hepatic lesions. Methods: Nine previously treated patients were divided into three groups with three patients in each. Group one: fractionated radiotherapy; Group two: SBRT-like treatments and Group three: fractionated radiotherapy targeting two PTVs. The clinically used plans were generated with the Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS). We re-planned these cases using a Mulitplan (MP) TPS for the CK M6 and normalizedmore » to the same PTV dose coverage. CK factors (CF) (defined as modulation scaling factor in this work), number of nodes (NN), number of MLC segments (NS) and beam delivery time (BT) with an estimated image interval of 60 seconds, were used for evaluation of delivery efficiency. Results: Generated plans from the MP and Eclipse TPS demonstrated the similar quality in terms of PTV confomality index, minimum and maximum PTV doses, and doses received by critical structures. Group one: CF ranged from 8.1 to 8.7, NN from 30 to 40, NS from 120 to 155 and BT from 20 to 23 minutes; group two: CF from 4.7 to 8.5, NN from 15 to 19, NS from 82 to 141 and BT from 18 to 24 minutes; and group three: CF from 7.9 to 10, NN from 47 to 49, NS from 110 to 113 and BT from 20 to 22 minutes. Conclusions: Delivery time is longer for the CK M6 than for the Varian linac (7.8 to 13.7 minutes). Further investigation will be necessary to determine if a PTV reduction from the tracking feature will shorten the delivery time without decreasing plan quality.« less