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Title: SU-F-T-10: Validation of ELP Dosimetry Using PRESAGE Dosimeter: Feasibility Test and Practical Considerations

Abstract

Purpose: To validate the use of a PRESAGE dosimeter as a method to quantitatively measure dose distributions of injectable brachytherapy based on elastin-like polypeptide (ELP) nanoparticles. PRESAGE is a solid, transparent polyurethane-based dosimeter whose dose is proportional to a change in optical density, making it useful for visualizing the dose from a radionuclide-tagged-ELP injection. Methods: A PRESAGE dosimeter was designed to simulate an ELP injection. To calibrate, cuvette samples from the batch of PRESAGE were exposed to varying levels of radiation from 0–35.9Gy applied via a linear accelerator, then placed into a spectrophotometer to obtain the optical density change as a function of dose. A pre-optical-CT scan was acquired of the phantom to obtain a baseline tomographic optical density. A 1cc saline solution of I-125 tagged-ELP with and activity concentration of 1mCi/cc was injected into the phantom and left for five days. After five days, the ELP was removed and the cavity cleaned of all remaining radioactive material. Post tomographic optical images were acquired to obtain a differential optical density dataset. Results: Initial results after the 5-day exposure revealed an opaque white film that resembled the volume of the ELP solution injected into the phantom. We think this is possiblymore » due to the saline solution diffusing into the PRESAGE and causing a change in the index of refraction at this shallow depth. Therefore, initially the optical scanner yielded inconclusive results. After several more days, the saline seemed to have evaporated out of the injection site and the ELP dose distribution was visible via color change in the dosimeter. Conclusion: We have created the first experimental design to measure the dose distribution of I-125-tagged-ELP. The PRESAGE formulation proves to be a feasible option for such measurements. Future experimental measurements need to be obtained to further characterize ELP dosimetry.« less

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]; ;  [2]; ;  [1];  [3]
  1. Duke University Medical Physics Program, Durham, NC (United States)
  2. Duke University Department of Biomedical Engineering, Durham, NC (United States)
  3. (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22642260
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; 60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; BRACHYTHERAPY; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; DATASETS; DOSEMETERS; DOSIMETRY; INJECTION; IODINE 125; LINEAR ACCELERATORS; OPACITY; PHANTOMS; POLYPEPTIDES; POLYURETHANES; RADIATION DOSE DISTRIBUTIONS; RADIATION DOSES; REFRACTIVE INDEX; VALIDATION

Citation Formats

Lambson, K, Lafata, K, Miles, D, Yoon, S, Schaal, J, Liu, W, Oldham, M, Cai, J, and Duke University Medical Center, Radiation Oncology, Durham, NC. SU-F-T-10: Validation of ELP Dosimetry Using PRESAGE Dosimeter: Feasibility Test and Practical Considerations. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4956144.
Lambson, K, Lafata, K, Miles, D, Yoon, S, Schaal, J, Liu, W, Oldham, M, Cai, J, & Duke University Medical Center, Radiation Oncology, Durham, NC. SU-F-T-10: Validation of ELP Dosimetry Using PRESAGE Dosimeter: Feasibility Test and Practical Considerations. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956144.
Lambson, K, Lafata, K, Miles, D, Yoon, S, Schaal, J, Liu, W, Oldham, M, Cai, J, and Duke University Medical Center, Radiation Oncology, Durham, NC. 2016. "SU-F-T-10: Validation of ELP Dosimetry Using PRESAGE Dosimeter: Feasibility Test and Practical Considerations". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956144.
@article{osti_22642260,
title = {SU-F-T-10: Validation of ELP Dosimetry Using PRESAGE Dosimeter: Feasibility Test and Practical Considerations},
author = {Lambson, K and Lafata, K and Miles, D and Yoon, S and Schaal, J and Liu, W and Oldham, M and Cai, J and Duke University Medical Center, Radiation Oncology, Durham, NC},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To validate the use of a PRESAGE dosimeter as a method to quantitatively measure dose distributions of injectable brachytherapy based on elastin-like polypeptide (ELP) nanoparticles. PRESAGE is a solid, transparent polyurethane-based dosimeter whose dose is proportional to a change in optical density, making it useful for visualizing the dose from a radionuclide-tagged-ELP injection. Methods: A PRESAGE dosimeter was designed to simulate an ELP injection. To calibrate, cuvette samples from the batch of PRESAGE were exposed to varying levels of radiation from 0–35.9Gy applied via a linear accelerator, then placed into a spectrophotometer to obtain the optical density change as a function of dose. A pre-optical-CT scan was acquired of the phantom to obtain a baseline tomographic optical density. A 1cc saline solution of I-125 tagged-ELP with and activity concentration of 1mCi/cc was injected into the phantom and left for five days. After five days, the ELP was removed and the cavity cleaned of all remaining radioactive material. Post tomographic optical images were acquired to obtain a differential optical density dataset. Results: Initial results after the 5-day exposure revealed an opaque white film that resembled the volume of the ELP solution injected into the phantom. We think this is possibly due to the saline solution diffusing into the PRESAGE and causing a change in the index of refraction at this shallow depth. Therefore, initially the optical scanner yielded inconclusive results. After several more days, the saline seemed to have evaporated out of the injection site and the ELP dose distribution was visible via color change in the dosimeter. Conclusion: We have created the first experimental design to measure the dose distribution of I-125-tagged-ELP. The PRESAGE formulation proves to be a feasible option for such measurements. Future experimental measurements need to be obtained to further characterize ELP dosimetry.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4956144},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Purpose: To assess the utility of optically stimulated luminescent (OSL) dosimeter technology in calibrating and validating a Monte Carlo radiation transport code for computed tomography (CT). Methods: Exposure data were taken using both a standard CT 100-mm pencil ionization chamber and a series of 150-mm OSL CT dosimeters. Measurements were made at system isocenter in air as well as in standard 16-cm (head) and 32-cm (body) CTDI phantoms at isocenter and at the 12 o'clock positions. Scans were performed on a Philips Brilliance 64 CT scanner for 100 and 120 kVp at 300 mAs with a nominal beam width ofmore » 40 mm. A radiation transport code to simulate the CT scanner conditions was developed using the GEANT4 physics toolkit. The imaging geometry and associated parameters were simulated for each ionization chamber and phantom combination. Simulated absorbed doses were compared to both CTDI{sub 100} values determined from the ion chamber and to CTDI{sub 100} values reported from the OSLs. The dose profiles from each simulation were also compared to the physical OSL dose profiles. Results: CTDI{sub 100} values reported by the ion chamber and OSLs are generally in good agreement (average percent difference of 9%), and provide a suitable way to calibrate doses obtained from simulation to real absorbed doses. Simulated and real CTDI{sub 100} values agree to within 10% or less, and the simulated dose profiles also predict the physical profiles reported by the OSLs. Conclusion: Ionization chambers are generally considered the standard for absolute dose measurements. However, OSL dosimeters may also serve as a useful tool with the significant benefit of also assessing the radiation dose profile. This may offer an advantage to those developing simulations for assessing radiation dosimetry such as verification of spatial dose distribution and beam width.« less
  • Purpose: To quantify the sensitivity and stability of the Presage dosimeter in sheet form for different concentrations of chemicals and for a diverse range of clinical photon energies. Methods: Presage polymer dosimeters are formulated to investigate and optimize their sensitivity and stability. The dosimeter is composed of clear polyurethane base, leucomalachite green reporting dye, and bromoform radical initiator in 1mm thick sheets. The chemicals are well mixed together, cast in an aluminum mold, and left to cure at 60 psi for a minimum of 2 days. Dosimeter response will be characterized at multiple energies including Co-60, 6 MV, 15 MV,more » 50 kVp, and 250 kVp. The dosimeters are read by an Epson 10000 XL scanner at 800 dpi, 2{sup 16} bit depth. Red component images are analyzed with ImageJ. Results: Analysis of optical density verse dose for Co-60 energies indicates that the bromoform containing Presage was able to quantify dose from 0 to 300 Gy, with saturation beyond 300 Gy. Initial results show two regions of linear response, 0–100 Gy and 150–300 Gy. The 150–300 Gy region has a sensitivity of 0.0024 net OD/Gy. Further results on other energies are still in progress. Conclusions: This work shows the potential for use of thin sheets of Presage dosimeter as a dosimeter capable of being analyzed with a flatbed scanner.« less
  • Purpose: To measure sensitivity and stability of the Presage dosimeter in sheet form for various chemical concentrations over a range of clinical photon energies and examine its use for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) QA. Methods: Presage polymer dosimeters were formulated to investigate and optimize their sensitivity and stability. The dosimeter is composed of clear polyurethane base, leucomalachite green (LMG) reporting dye, and bromoform radical initiator in 0.9–1.0 mm thick sheets. The chemicals are mixed together for 2 min, cast in an aluminum mold, and left to cure at 60 psi for a minimum of twomore » days. Dosimeter response was characterized at energies Co-60, 6 MV, 10 MV flattening-filter free, 15 MV, 50 kVp (mean 19.2 keV), and Ir-192. The dosimeters were scanned by a Microtek Scanmaker i800 at 300 dpi, 2{sup 16} bit depth per color channel. Red component images were analyzed with ImageJ and RIT. SBRT QA was done with gamma analysis tolerances of 2% and 2 mm DTA. Results: The sensitivity of the Presage dosimeter increased with increasing concentration of bromoform. Addition of tin catalyst decreased curing time and had negligible effect on sensitivity. LMG concentration should be at least as high as the bromoform, with ideal concentration being 2% wt. Gamma Knife SRS QA measurements of relative output and profile widths were within 2% of manufacturer’s values validated at commissioning, except the 4 mm collimator relative output which was within 3%. The gamma pass rate of Presage with SBRT was 73.7%, compared to 93.1% for EBT2 Gafchromic film. Conclusions: The Presage dosimeter in sheet form was capable of detecting radiation over all tested photon energies and chemical concentrations. The best sensitivity and photostability of the dosimeter were achieved with 2.5% wt. LMG and 8.2% wt. bromoform. Scanner used should not emit any UV radiation as it will expose the dosimeter, as with the Epson 10000 XL scanner. Presage dosimeter in this form was sensitive enough for use in SRS and SBRT QA. The lower gamma pass rate for Presage compared to Gafchromic film can be attributed to the simple equipment used in the fabrication process, which limited the dosimeter’s sensitivity uniformity by agglomeration of air bubbles in the material, nonuniform concentration of chemicals throughout the material, and thickness variations. This demands improvements in mixing tools and molds.« less
  • Purpose: To experimentally determine the influence of atmospheric oxygen on the efficiency of the PRESAGE dosimeter and its reporting system. Methods: Batches of the reporting system – a mixture of chloroform and leuchomalachite green dye – and PRESAGE were prepared in aerobic and anaerobic conditions. For anaerobic batches, samples were deoxygenated by bubbling nitrogen through the dosimeter precursors or reporting system for 10 min. The dosimeters and reporting systems were prepared in spectrophotometric cuvettes and glass vials, respectively, and were irradiated with 6 MV photons to various radiation doses using a clinical linear accelerator. Changes in optical density of themore » dosimeters and reporting system before and after irradiation were measured using a spectrophotometer. In addition, the concentrations of dissolved oxygen were measured using a dissolved oxygen meter. Results: The experiments revealed that oxygen has little influence on the characteristics of PRESAGE, with the radical initiator oxidizing the leucomalachite green even in the presence of oxygen. However, deoxygenation of the reporting system leads to an increase in sensitivity to radiation dose by ∼ 30% when compared to the non-deoxygenated system. A slight improvement in sensitivity (∼ 5%) was also achieved by deoxygenating the PRESAGE precursor prior to casting. Measurement of the dissolved oxygen revealed low levels (0.4 ppm) in the polyurethane precursor used to fabricate the dosimeters, as compared to water (8.6 ppm). In addition, deoxygenation had no effect on the retention of the post-response absorption value of the PRESAGE dosimeter. Conclusion: The results suggest that the presence of oxygen does not inhibit the radiochromic properties of the PRESAGE system. In addition, there were no observed changes in the dose linearity, absorption spectrum and post-response photofading characteristics of the PRESAGE under the conditions investigated.« less