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Title: SU-F-T-09: In Phantom Full-Implant Validation of Plastic Scintillation Detectors for in Vivo Dosimetry During Low Dose Rate Brachytherapy

Abstract

Purpose: To validate in a water phantom the use of plastic scintillation detectors to measure dose to the urethra and the rectal wall during a clinically realistic low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy implant. Methods: A template was designed to replicate a clinically realistic LDR brachytherapy prostate implant inside a water phantom. Twenty-two catheters were inserted, including one mimicking the urethra and another the rectal wall. The needles inserted in the remaining 20 catheters were composed of thin-walled nylon tubes in which I-125 radioactive seeds (Air Kerma Strengths of (0.328±0.020)U) were abutted together with plastic spacers to replicate a typical loading. A plastic scintillation detector (PSD) with a 5-mm long × 1-mm diameter sensitive element was first placed inside the urethra and 1-second measurements were performed for 60s after each needle implant. Measurements were also performed at multiple positions along the urethra once all the needles were inserted. The procedure was then repeated with the PSD placed at the rectal wall. Results: Individual dose-rates ranging from 0.07µGy/s to 1.5µGy/s were measured after each needle implant. The average absolute relative differences were (6.2±3.6)% and (6.9±6.5)% to the values calculated with the TG-43 formalism, for the urethra and rectal wall respectively. These resultsmore » are within expectations from the error uncertainty budget once accounting for uncertainties in seeds’ strength and positioning. Interestingly, the PSD allowed for unplanned error detection as the study was performed. Finally, the measured dose after the full implant at different positions along the mimicked organs at risk were in agreement with TG-43 values for all of the positions tested. Conclusion: Plastic scintillation detectors could be used as in vivo detectors for LDR brachytherapy as they would provide accurate dose information after each needle implant as well as along the organs at risk at the end of the implant.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)
  2. CHU de Quebec, Quebec, QC, CA (Canada)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22642259
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; 60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; BRACHYTHERAPY; DOSE RATES; IODINE 125; NYLON; PHANTOMS; PLASTIC SCINTILLATION DETECTORS; PROSTATE; RADIATION SOURCE IMPLANTS; RECTUM; URINARY TRACT; VALIDATION

Citation Formats

Therriault-Proulx, F, Bruno, T, Beddar, S, and Beaulieu, L. SU-F-T-09: In Phantom Full-Implant Validation of Plastic Scintillation Detectors for in Vivo Dosimetry During Low Dose Rate Brachytherapy. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4956143.
Therriault-Proulx, F, Bruno, T, Beddar, S, & Beaulieu, L. SU-F-T-09: In Phantom Full-Implant Validation of Plastic Scintillation Detectors for in Vivo Dosimetry During Low Dose Rate Brachytherapy. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956143.
Therriault-Proulx, F, Bruno, T, Beddar, S, and Beaulieu, L. 2016. "SU-F-T-09: In Phantom Full-Implant Validation of Plastic Scintillation Detectors for in Vivo Dosimetry During Low Dose Rate Brachytherapy". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956143.
@article{osti_22642259,
title = {SU-F-T-09: In Phantom Full-Implant Validation of Plastic Scintillation Detectors for in Vivo Dosimetry During Low Dose Rate Brachytherapy},
author = {Therriault-Proulx, F and Bruno, T and Beddar, S and Beaulieu, L},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To validate in a water phantom the use of plastic scintillation detectors to measure dose to the urethra and the rectal wall during a clinically realistic low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy implant. Methods: A template was designed to replicate a clinically realistic LDR brachytherapy prostate implant inside a water phantom. Twenty-two catheters were inserted, including one mimicking the urethra and another the rectal wall. The needles inserted in the remaining 20 catheters were composed of thin-walled nylon tubes in which I-125 radioactive seeds (Air Kerma Strengths of (0.328±0.020)U) were abutted together with plastic spacers to replicate a typical loading. A plastic scintillation detector (PSD) with a 5-mm long × 1-mm diameter sensitive element was first placed inside the urethra and 1-second measurements were performed for 60s after each needle implant. Measurements were also performed at multiple positions along the urethra once all the needles were inserted. The procedure was then repeated with the PSD placed at the rectal wall. Results: Individual dose-rates ranging from 0.07µGy/s to 1.5µGy/s were measured after each needle implant. The average absolute relative differences were (6.2±3.6)% and (6.9±6.5)% to the values calculated with the TG-43 formalism, for the urethra and rectal wall respectively. These results are within expectations from the error uncertainty budget once accounting for uncertainties in seeds’ strength and positioning. Interestingly, the PSD allowed for unplanned error detection as the study was performed. Finally, the measured dose after the full implant at different positions along the mimicked organs at risk were in agreement with TG-43 values for all of the positions tested. Conclusion: Plastic scintillation detectors could be used as in vivo detectors for LDR brachytherapy as they would provide accurate dose information after each needle implant as well as along the organs at risk at the end of the implant.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4956143},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Purpose: To develop a technique to monitor the dose rate in the urethra during permanent implant brachytherapy using a linear MOSFET array, with sufficient accuracy and without significantly extending the implantation time. Methods and Materials: Phantom measurements were performed to determine the optimal conditions for clinical measurements. In vivo measurements were performed in 5 patients during the {sup 125}I brachytherapy implant procedure. To evaluate if the urethra dose obtained in the operating room with the ultrasound transducer in the rectum and the patient in treatment position is a reference for the total accumulated dose; additional measurements were performed after themore » implantation procedure, in the recovery room. Results: In vivo measurements during and after the implantation procedure agree very well, illustrating that the ultrasound transducer in the rectum and patient positioning do not influence the measured dose in the urethra. In vivo dose values obtained during the implantation are therefore representative for the total accumulated dose in the urethra. In 5 patients, the dose rates during and after the implantation were below the maximum dose rate of the urethra, using the planned seed distribution. Conclusion: In vivo dosimetry during the implantation, using a MOSFET array, is a feasible technique to evaluate the dose in the urethra during the implantation of {sup 125}I seeds for prostate brachytherapy.« less
  • Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate whether or not a stem effect removal technique is necessary when performing Ir-192 HDR brachytherapy in vivo dosimetry using a scintillation detector. Methods: A red-green-blue photodiode connected to a multichannel electrometer was used to detect the light emitted from a plastic scintillation detector (PSD) during irradiation with an Ir-192 HDR brachytherapy source. Accuracy in dose measurement was compared with and without the use of stem effect removal techniques. Monochromatic and polychromatic filtration techniques were studied. An in-house template was built for accurate positioning of catheters in which the source and themore » PSD were inserted. Dose distribution was measured up to 5 cm from source to detector in the radial and longitudinal directions. Results: The authors found the stem effect to be particularly important when the source was close to the optical fiber guide and far from the scintillation component of the detector. It can account for up to (72{+-}3)% of the signal under clinically relevant conditions. The polychromatic filtration outperformed the monochromatic filtration as well as the absence of filtration in regard to dose measurement accuracy. Conclusions: It is necessary to implement a stem effect removal technique when building a PSD for in vivo dosimetry during Ir-192 HDR brachytherapy. The PSD that the authors have developed for this study would be suitable for such an application.« less
  • Purpose: There is strong evidence relating post-implant dosimetry for low-dose-rate (LDR) prostate seed brachytherapy to local control rates. The delineation of the prostate on CT images, however, represents a challenge due to the lack of soft tissue contrast in order to identify the prostate borders. This study aims at quantifying the sensitivity of clinically relevant dosimetric parameters to uncertainty in the contouring of prostate. Methods: CT images, post-op plans and contours of a cohort of patients (n=43) (low risk=55.8%, intermediate risk=39.5%, high risk=4.7%), who had received prostate seed brachytherapy, were imported into MIM Symphony treatment planning system. The prostate contoursmore » in post-implant CT images were expanded/contracted uniformly for margins of ±1.00 mm, ±2.00 mm, ±3.00 mm, ±4.00 mm and ±5.00 mm. The values for V100 and D90 were extracted from Dose Volume Histograms for each contour and compared. Results: Significant changes were observed in the values of D90 and V100 as well as the number of suboptimal plans for expansion or contraction margins of only few millimeters. Evaluation of coverage based on D90 was found to be less sensitive to expansion errors compared to V100. D90 led to a lower number of implants incorrectly identified with insufficient coverage for expanded contours which increases the accuracy of post-implant QA using CT images compared to V100. Conclusion: In order to establish a successful post implant QA for LDR prostate seed brachytherapy, it is necessary to identify the low and high thresholds of important dose metrics of the target volume such as D90 and V100. Since these parameters are sensitive to target volume definition, accurate identification of prostate borders would help to improve accuracy and predictive value of the post-implant QA process. In this respect, use of imaging modalities such as MRI where prostate is well delineated should prove useful.« less
  • Purpose: In the present study, we have presented and validated a plastic scintillation detector (PSD) system designed for real-time multiprobe in vivo measurements. Methods and Materials: The PSDs were built with a dose-sensitive volume of 0.4 mm{sup 3}. The PSDs were assembled into modular detector patches, each containing five closely packed PSDs. Continuous dose readings were performed every 150 ms, with a gap between consecutive readings of <0.3 ms. We first studied the effect of electron multiplication. We then assessed system performance in acrylic and anthropomorphic pelvic phantoms. Results: The PSDs were compatible with clinical rectal balloons and were easilymore » inserted into the anthropomorphic phantom. With an electron multiplication average gain factor of 40, a twofold increase in the signal/noise ratio was observed, making near real-time dosimetry feasible. Under calibration conditions, the PSDs agreed with the ion chamber measurements to 0.08%. Precision, evaluated as a function of the total dose delivered, ranged from 2.3% at 2 cGy to 0.4% at 200 cGy. Conclusion: Real-time PSD measurements are highly accurate and precise. These PSDs can be mounted onto rectal balloons, transforming these clinical devices into in vivo dose detectors without modifying current clinical practice. Real-time monitoring of the dose delivered near the rectum during prostate radiotherapy should help radiation oncologists protect this sensitive normal structure.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate the performance characteristics of plastic scintillation detectors (PSDs) in an in vivo environment for external beam radiation, and to establish the usefulness and ease of implementation of a PSD based in vivo dosimetry system for routine clinical use. Methods: A five patient IRB approved in vivo dosimetry study was performed. Five patients with prostate cancer were enrolled and PSDs were used to monitor rectal wall dose and verify the delivered dose for approximately two fractions each week over the course of their treatment (approximately fourteen fractions), resulting in a total of 142 in vivo measurements. A setmore » of two PSDs was fabricated for each patient. At each monitored fraction the PSDs were attached to the anterior surface of an endorectal balloon used to immobilize the patient's prostate during treatment. A CT scan was acquired with a CTon- rails linear accelerator to localize the detectors and to calculate the dose expected to be delivered to the detectors. Each PSD acquired data in 10 second intervals for the duration of the treatment. The deviation between expected and measured cumulative dose was calculated for each detector for each fraction, and averaged over each patient and the patient population as a whole. Results: The average difference between expected dose and measured dose ranged from -3.3% to 3.3% for individual patients, with standard deviations between 5.6% and 7.1% for four of the patients. The average difference for the entire population was -0.4% with a standard deviation of 2.8%. The detectors were well tolerated by the patients and the system did not interrupt the clinical workflow. Conclusion: PSDs perform well as in vivo dosimeters, exhibiting good accuracy and precision. This, combined with the practicability of using such a system, positions the PSD as a strong candidate for clinical in vivo dosimetry in the future. This work supported in part by the National Cancer Institute through an R01 grant (CA120198-01A2) and by the American Legion Auxiliary through the American Auxiliary Fellowship in Cancer Research.« less