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Title: SU-F-J-167: Use of MR for Permanent Prostate Implant Preplanning

Abstract

Purpose: To study the feasibility using MR imaging to improve target definition on ultrasound during permanent prostate implants and aid in source strength determination for treatment planning in the OR. Methods: Patients who receive permanent prostate implants undergo MR and CT imaging prior to the implant procedure to determine the volume of the prostate, bony restriction to the procedure, bladder extension, external sphincter length and neurovascular bundle. The volume of the prostate is generally used to order seeds for the procedure. In 10 patients, the MR was used as the preplanning study with the PTV defined as a 2 mm expansion of the MR prostate in all directions except the posterior. Various dose volume parameters for the MR prostate and the PTV were compared to the actual preplan developed and executed in the OR. In addition, there parameters were compared to the post implant dosimetry performed 3 weeks after the implant procedure. Results: The results show that the number of seeds used using MR and US (ultrasound) planning was generally with 2 seeds and the maximum difference was 7 seeds. There is no significant difference between any of the dose index parameters of V100, V150, V200, D99 and D90 parametersmore » between MR planning, US planning and postimplant evaluation There was a significant difference between planned D99 (avg of 105%) and achieved D99 (avg 91%). Conclusion: MR imaging is an invaluable tool to improve target definition for permanent prostate implants. Use of MR images for preplanning improves the confidence with which source can be ordered for the procedure that is OR planned. Ordering a maximum of 10 seeds more than planned would be sufficient to deliver a plan in the OR using US. Moving ahead to non-rigid registration between MR ad US images could further increase the confidence level of MR planning.« less

Authors:
;  [1];  [2];  [1]
  1. Assarian Cancer Center, Novi, MI (United States)
  2. (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22634766
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; BLADDER; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; DOSIMETRY; IMAGES; PATIENTS; PROSTATE; RADIATION DOSES; RADIATION SOURCE IMPLANTS

Citation Formats

Narayana, V, McLaughlin, P, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, and Yao, B. SU-F-J-167: Use of MR for Permanent Prostate Implant Preplanning. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4956075.
Narayana, V, McLaughlin, P, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, & Yao, B. SU-F-J-167: Use of MR for Permanent Prostate Implant Preplanning. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956075.
Narayana, V, McLaughlin, P, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, and Yao, B. 2016. "SU-F-J-167: Use of MR for Permanent Prostate Implant Preplanning". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956075.
@article{osti_22634766,
title = {SU-F-J-167: Use of MR for Permanent Prostate Implant Preplanning},
author = {Narayana, V and McLaughlin, P and University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI and Yao, B},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To study the feasibility using MR imaging to improve target definition on ultrasound during permanent prostate implants and aid in source strength determination for treatment planning in the OR. Methods: Patients who receive permanent prostate implants undergo MR and CT imaging prior to the implant procedure to determine the volume of the prostate, bony restriction to the procedure, bladder extension, external sphincter length and neurovascular bundle. The volume of the prostate is generally used to order seeds for the procedure. In 10 patients, the MR was used as the preplanning study with the PTV defined as a 2 mm expansion of the MR prostate in all directions except the posterior. Various dose volume parameters for the MR prostate and the PTV were compared to the actual preplan developed and executed in the OR. In addition, there parameters were compared to the post implant dosimetry performed 3 weeks after the implant procedure. Results: The results show that the number of seeds used using MR and US (ultrasound) planning was generally with 2 seeds and the maximum difference was 7 seeds. There is no significant difference between any of the dose index parameters of V100, V150, V200, D99 and D90 parameters between MR planning, US planning and postimplant evaluation There was a significant difference between planned D99 (avg of 105%) and achieved D99 (avg 91%). Conclusion: MR imaging is an invaluable tool to improve target definition for permanent prostate implants. Use of MR images for preplanning improves the confidence with which source can be ordered for the procedure that is OR planned. Ordering a maximum of 10 seeds more than planned would be sufficient to deliver a plan in the OR using US. Moving ahead to non-rigid registration between MR ad US images could further increase the confidence level of MR planning.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4956075},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Purpose: To compare the urethral and prostate absolute and biologic effective doses (BEDs) for {sup 131}Cs and {sup 125}I prostate permanent implant brachytherapy (PPI). Methods and Materials: Eight previously implanted manually planned {sup 125}I PPI patients were replanned manually with {sup 131}Cs, and re-planned using Inverse Planning Simulated Annealing. {sup 131}Cs activity and the prescribed dose (115 Gy) were determined from that recommended by IsoRay. The BED was calculated for the prostate and urethra using an {alpha}/{beta} ratio of 2 and was also calculated for the prostate using an {alpha}/{beta} ratio of 6 and a urethral {alpha}/{beta} ratio of 2.more » The primary endpoints of this study were the prostate D{sub 90} BED (pD{sub 90}BED) and urethral D{sub 30} BED normalized to the maximal potential prostate D{sub 90} BED (nuD{sub 30}BED). Results: The manual plan comparison ({alpha}/{beta} = 2) yielded no significant difference in the prostate D{sub 90} BED (median, 192 Gy{sub 2} for both isotopes). No significant difference was observed for the nuD{sub 30}BED (median, 199 Gy{sub 2} and 202 Gy{sub 2} for {sup 125}I and {sup 131}Cs, respectively). For the inverse planning simulated annealing plan comparisons ({alpha}/{beta} 2), the prostate D{sub 90} BED was significantly lower with {sup 131}Cs than with {sup 125}I (median, 177 Gy{sub 2} vs. 187 Gy{sub 2}, respectively; p = 0.01). However, the nuD{sub 30}BED was significantly greater with {sup 131}Cs than with {sup 125}I (median, 192 Gy{sub 2} vs. 189 Gy{sub 2}, respectively; p = 0.01). Both the manual and the inverse planning simulated annealing plans resulted in a significantly lower prostate D{sub 90} BED (p = 0.01) and significantly greater nuD{sub 30}BED for {sup 131}Cs (p = 0.01), compared with {sup 125}I, when the prostate {alpha}/{beta} ratio was 6 and the urethral {alpha}/{beta} ratio was 2. Conclusion: This report highlights the controversy in comparing the dose to both the prostate and the organs at risk with different radionuclides.« less
  • Purpose: To compare stranded seeds (SSs) with loose seeds (LSs) in terms of prostate edema, dosimetry, and seed loss after {sup 125}I brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Two prospective cohorts of 20 men participated in an institutional review board-approved protocols to study postimplant prostate edema and its effect on dosimetry. The LS cohort underwent brachytherapy between September 2002 and July 2003 and the SS cohort between April 2006 and January 2007. Both cohorts were evaluated sequentially using computed tomography-magnetic resonance imaging fusion-based dosimetry on Days 0, 7, and 30. No hormonal therapy or supplemental beam radiotherapy was used. Results: Prostate edemamore » was less in the SS cohort at all points (p = NS). On Day 0, all the prostate dosimetric factors were greater in the LS group than in the SS group (p = 0.003). However, by Days 7 and 30, the dosimetry was similar between the two cohorts. No seeds migrated to the lung in the SS cohort compared with a total of five seeds in 4 patients in the LS cohort. However, the overall seed loss was greater in the SS cohort (24 seeds in 6 patients; 1.1% of total vs. 0.6% for LSs), with most seeds lost through urine (22 seeds in 5 patients). Conclusion: Despite elimination of venous seed migration, greater seed loss was observed with SSs compared with LSs, with the primary site of loss being the urinary tract. Modification of the technique might be necessary to minimize this. Prostate dosimetry on Days 7 and 30 was similar between the SS and LS cohorts.« less
  • Purpose: Permanent prostate implant brachytherapy (PPI), three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), and conformal proton beam radiotherapy (CPBRT) are used in the treatment of localized prostate cancer, although no head-to-head trials have compared these modalities. We studied the biochemical control (biochemical no evidence of disease [bNED]) and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) nadir achieved with contemporary PPI, and evaluated it against 3D-CRT and CPBRT. Patients and Methods: A total of 249 patients were treated with PPI at the University of California, San Francisco, and the outcomes were compared with those from a 3D-CRT cohort and the published results of a high-dose CPBRT boost (CPBRTB)more » trial. For each comparison, subsets of the PPI cohort were selected with patient and disease criteria similar to those of the reference group. Results: With a median follow-up of 5.3 years, the bNED rate at 5 and 7 years achieved with PPI was 92% and 86%, respectively, using the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) definition, and 93% using the PSA nadir plus 2 ng/mL definition. Using the ASTRO definition, a 5-year bNED rate of 78% was achieved for the 3D-CRT patients compared with 94% for a comparable PPI subset and 93% vs. 92%, respectively, using the PSA nadir plus 2 ng/mL definition. The median PSA nadir for patients treated with PPI and 3D-CRT was 0.10 and 0.40 ng/mL, respectively (p < .0001). For the CPBRT comparison, the 5-year bNED rate after a CPBRTB was 91% using the ASTRO definition vs. 93% for a similar group of PPI patients. A greater proportion of PPI patients achieved a lower PSA nadir compared with those achieved in the CPBRTB trial (PSA nadir <=0.5 ng/mL, 91% vs. 59%, respectively). Conclusion: We have demonstrated excellent outcomes in low- to intermediate-risk patients treated with PPI, suggesting at least equivalent 5-year bNED rates and a greater proportion of men achieving lower PSA nadirs compared with 3D-CRT or CPBRTB.« less
  • Purpose: To assess the feasibility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-planned partial salvage permanent prostate implant (psPPI) among patients with biopsy-proven local recurrence after initial PPI without evidence of distant disease. Methods and Materials: From 2003-2009, 15 patients underwent MRI/magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) planning for salvage brachytherapy (psPPI, I-125 [n=14; 144 Gy]; Pd-103 [n=1; 125 Gy]) without hormone therapy. Full dose was prescribed to areas of recurrence and underdosage, without entire prostate implantation. Limiting urethral and rectal toxicity was prioritized. Follow-up was from salvage date to prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concentration failure (Phoenix criteria = nadir + 2.0; ASTRO = 3 consecutivemore » rises), recurrence, distant metastases, or last follow-up PSA level. Progression-free survival (PFS) was defined as no PSA failure or biopsy-proven recurrence without all-cause mortality. Toxicity was scored using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. Results: At salvage, median age was 68 years, and PSA concentration was 3.5 ng/mL (range, 0.9-5.6 ng/mL). Abnormal MRI/MRS findings were evident in 40% of patients. Biopsy-proven recurrences consisted of a single focus (80%) or 2 foci (20%). At recurrence, Gleason score was 6 (67%) or {>=}7 (27%). Median interval between initial and salvage implantation was 69 months (range, 28-132 months). psPPI planning characteristics limited doses to the rectum (mean V100 = 0.5% [0.07 cc]) and urethra (V100 = 12% [0.3 cc]). At median follow-up (23.3 months; range, 8-88 months), treatment failure (n=2) resulted only in localized recurrence; both patients underwent second psPPI with follow-up PSA tests at 12 and 26 months, resulting in 0.6 and 0.7 ng/mL, respectively. American Society for Radiation Oncology PFS rates at 1, 2, and 3 years were 86.7%, 78.4%, and 62.7%, respectively, with 5 patients for whom treatment failed (n=3 with negative transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy results). Phoenix PFS rates at 1, 2, and 3 years were 100%, 100%, and 71.4%. 73%, respectively; achieved PSA nadir of <0.5 ng/mL; and 47% of patients had a nadir of <0.1 ng/mL. Treatment-related toxicity was minimal, with no operative interventions, fistulas, or other grade {>=}3 gastrointestinal (GI)/genitourinary (GU) toxicity. Thirteen percent had grade 1 GI and 33% had grade 2 GU toxicities. Postsalvage, 20% of patients had no erectile dysfunction, 67% of patients had medication-responsive erectile dysfunction, and 13% of patients had erectile dysfunction refractory to medication. Conclusions: Focal psPPI with MR-planning in highly selected patients is feasible with short-term control comparable to conventional salvage, with less toxicity. Longer follow-up is needed to confirm its impact on quality of life and treatment.« less
  • Purpose: The combination of permanent low-dose-rate interstitial implantation (LDR-BRT) and external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) has been used in the treatment of clinically localized prostate cancer. While a high radiation dose is delivered to the prostate in this setting, the actual biologic dose equivalence compared to monotherapy is not commonly invoked. We describe methodology for obtaining the fused dosimetry of this combined treatment and assigning a dose equivalence which in turn can be used to develop desired normal tissue and target constraints for biologic-based treatment planning. Methods and materials: Patients treated with this regimen initially receive an I-125 implant prescribed tomore » 110 Gy followed, 2 months later, by 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions using intensity-modulated external beam radiotherapy. Ab initio methodology is described, using clinically derived biologic parameters ({alpha}, {beta}, potential doubling time for prostate cancer cells [T{sub pot}], cell loss factor), for calculating tumor control probability isoeffective doses for the combined LDR and conventional fraction EBRT treatment regimen. As no such formalism exists for assessing rectal or urethral toxicity, we make use of semi-empirical expressions proposed for describing urethral and rectal complication probabilities for specific treatment situations (LDR and fractionation, respectively) and utilize the notion of isoeffective dose to extend these results to combined LDR-EBRT regimens. Results: The application to treatment planning of the methodology described in this study is illustrated with real-patient data. We evaluate the effect of changing LDR and EBRT prescription doses (in a manner that remains isoeffective with 81 Gy EBRT alone or with 144 Gy LDR monotherapy) on rectal and urethral complication probabilities, and suggest that it should be possible to improve the therapeutic ratio by exploiting joint LDR-EBRT planning. Conclusions: We describe new methodology for biologically based treatment planning for patients who receive combined low-dose-rate brachytherapy and external beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Using relevant mathematical tools, we demonstrate the feasibility of fusing dose distributions from each treatment for this combined regimen, which can then be expressed as isoeffective dose distributions. Based on this information, dose constraints for the rectum and urethra are described which could be used for planning such combination regimens.« less