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Title: SU-F-J-47: Inherent Uncertainty in the Positional Shifts Determined by a Volumetric Cone Beam Imaging System

Abstract

Purpose: To quantify inherent uncertainty associated with a volumetric imaging system in its determination of positional shifts. Methods: The study was performed on an Elekta Axesse™ linac’s XVI cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) system. A CT image data set of a Penta- Guide phantom was used as reference image by placing isocenter at the center of the phantom.The phantom was placed arbitrarily on the couch close to isocenter and CBCT images were obtained. The CBCT dataset was matched with the reference image using XVI software and the shifts were determined in 6-dimensions. Without moving the phantom, this process was repeated 20 times consecutively within 30 minutes on a single day. Mean shifts and their standard deviations in all 6-dimensions were determined for all the 20 instances of imaging. For any given day, the first set of shifts obtained was kept as reference and the deviations of the subsequent 19 sets from the reference set were scored. Mean differences and their standard deviations were determined. In this way, data were obtained for 30 consecutive working days. Results: Tabulating the mean deviations and their standard deviations observed on each day for the 30 measurement days, systematic and random errors in the determinationmore » of shifts by XVI software were calculated. The systematic errors were found to be 0.03, 0.04 and 0.03 mm while random errors were 0.05, 0.06 and 0.06 mm in lateral, craniocaudal and anterio-posterior directions respectively. For rotational shifts, the systematic errors were 0.02°, 0.03° and 0.03° and random errors were 0.06°, 0.05° and 0.05° in pitch, roll and yaw directions respectively. Conclusion: The inherent uncertainties in every image guidance system should be assessed and baseline values established at the time of its commissioning. These shall be periodically tested as part of the QA protocol.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. Fortis Memorial Research Institute, Gurgaon, Haryana (India)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22632179
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; 60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; BEAMS; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; COMMISSIONING; COMPUTER CODES; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; DATASETS; ERRORS; IMAGE PROCESSING; IMAGES; LINEAR ACCELERATORS; PHANTOMS; RANDOMNESS; WORKING DAYS

Citation Formats

Giri, U, Ganesh, T, Saini, V, Munshi, A, Sarkar, B, and Mohanti, B. SU-F-J-47: Inherent Uncertainty in the Positional Shifts Determined by a Volumetric Cone Beam Imaging System. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4955955.
Giri, U, Ganesh, T, Saini, V, Munshi, A, Sarkar, B, & Mohanti, B. SU-F-J-47: Inherent Uncertainty in the Positional Shifts Determined by a Volumetric Cone Beam Imaging System. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4955955.
Giri, U, Ganesh, T, Saini, V, Munshi, A, Sarkar, B, and Mohanti, B. Wed . "SU-F-J-47: Inherent Uncertainty in the Positional Shifts Determined by a Volumetric Cone Beam Imaging System". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4955955.
@article{osti_22632179,
title = {SU-F-J-47: Inherent Uncertainty in the Positional Shifts Determined by a Volumetric Cone Beam Imaging System},
author = {Giri, U and Ganesh, T and Saini, V and Munshi, A and Sarkar, B and Mohanti, B},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To quantify inherent uncertainty associated with a volumetric imaging system in its determination of positional shifts. Methods: The study was performed on an Elekta Axesse™ linac’s XVI cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) system. A CT image data set of a Penta- Guide phantom was used as reference image by placing isocenter at the center of the phantom.The phantom was placed arbitrarily on the couch close to isocenter and CBCT images were obtained. The CBCT dataset was matched with the reference image using XVI software and the shifts were determined in 6-dimensions. Without moving the phantom, this process was repeated 20 times consecutively within 30 minutes on a single day. Mean shifts and their standard deviations in all 6-dimensions were determined for all the 20 instances of imaging. For any given day, the first set of shifts obtained was kept as reference and the deviations of the subsequent 19 sets from the reference set were scored. Mean differences and their standard deviations were determined. In this way, data were obtained for 30 consecutive working days. Results: Tabulating the mean deviations and their standard deviations observed on each day for the 30 measurement days, systematic and random errors in the determination of shifts by XVI software were calculated. The systematic errors were found to be 0.03, 0.04 and 0.03 mm while random errors were 0.05, 0.06 and 0.06 mm in lateral, craniocaudal and anterio-posterior directions respectively. For rotational shifts, the systematic errors were 0.02°, 0.03° and 0.03° and random errors were 0.06°, 0.05° and 0.05° in pitch, roll and yaw directions respectively. Conclusion: The inherent uncertainties in every image guidance system should be assessed and baseline values established at the time of its commissioning. These shall be periodically tested as part of the QA protocol.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4955955},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
  • Purpose: To estimate the sensitivity of TrueBeam 2.0 Imaging System 6DoF automatic matching tool through the acquisition of cone-beam CT images in different phantoms applying submillimeter translations and rotations of tenths of a degree and registered with image simulation CT. Methods: To evaluate overall system-wide image, we consider two uncertainties source; First, the uncertainty of the manual phantom displacement (ε-m). This uncertainty is calculated by a digital caliper (0.01 mm) for vertical (Vrt), lateral (Lat) and longitudinal (Lng). A digital inclinometer (0.01°) for the pitch and roll and the own phantom scale to evaluate the coordinate rotation (Rtn). The secondmore » uncertainty is the displacement detected by the algorithm system of matching (σ-d) that we obtain from the standard deviations of the different measurements. We use three different phantoms. The BrainLab Radiosurgery system for supporting masks with an anthropomorphic dummy adapted to allow displacements of 0.1 mm in Vrt, Lat and Lng dimensions and rotations of 0.1° in Pitch dimension. For the analysis of the Rtn and Roll dimensions we use two homemade phantoms (RinoRot and RinoRoll, La Fe Hospital, Valencia, Spain) that allow rotations of 0.3°. Results: In the case of manual displacement of 0.10 ± 0.03 mm in the translations, the system detect 0.10 ± 0.07 mm, 0.12 ± 0.07 mm and 0.13 ± 0.07 mm (mean ± SD) in Lat, Vrt and Lng respectively. In the case of rotational dimension, manual displacement of 0.3 ± 0.1° was detected with 0.19 ± 0.06°, 0.29 ± 0.03° and 0.27 ± 0.06° in Pitch, Roll and Rtn. Conclusion: We conclude that the sensitivity of the automatic matching system is within 0.10 mm in translations and 0.3° in rotations. These values are under the own sensitivity of the software.« less
  • Purpose To compare online image registrations of TrueBeam cone-beam CT (CBCT) and BrainLab ExacTrac imaging systems. Methods Tests were performed on a Varian TrueBeam STx linear accelerator (Version 2.0), which is integrated with a BrainLab ExacTrac imaging system (Version 6.0.5). The study was focused on comparing the online image registrations for translational shifts. A Rando head phantom was placed on treatment couch and immobilized with a BrainLab mask. The phantom was shifted by moving the couch translationally for 8 mm with a step size of 1 mm, in vertical, longitudinal, and lateral directions, respectively. At each location, the phantom wasmore » imaged with CBCT and ExacTrac x-ray. CBCT images were registered with TrueBeam and ExacTrac online registration algorithms, respectively. And ExacTrac x-ray image registrations were performed. Shifts calculated from different registrations were compared with nominal couch shifts. Results The averages and ranges of absolute differences between couch shifts and calculated phantom shifts obtained from ExacTrac x-ray registration, ExacTrac CBCT registration with default window, ExaxTrac CBCT registration with adjusted window (bone), Truebeam CBCT registration with bone window, and Truebeam CBCT registration with soft tissue window, were: 0.07 (0.02–0.14), 0.14 (0.01–0.35), 0.12 (0.02–0.28), 0.09 (0–0.20), and 0.06 (0–0.10) mm, in vertical direction; 0.06 (0.01–0.12), 0.27 (0.07–0.57), 0.23 (0.02–0.48), 0.04 (0–0.10), and 0.08 (0– 0.20) mm, in longitudinal direction; 0.05 (0.01–0.21), 0.35 (0.14–0.80), 0.25 (0.01–0.56), 0.19 (0–0.40), and 0.20 (0–0.40) mm, in lateral direction. Conclusion The shifts calculated from ExacTrac x-ray and TrueBeam CBCT registrations were close to each other (the differences between were less than 0.40 mm in any direction), and had better agreements with couch shifts than those from ExacTrac CBCT registrations. There were no significant differences between TrueBeam CBCT registrations using different windows. In ExacTrac CBCT registrations, using bone window led to better agreements than using default window.« less
  • Purpose: Existing real-time imaging uses dual (orthogonal) kV beam fluoroscopies and may result in significant amount of extra radiation to patients, especially for prolonged treatment cases. In addition, kV projections only provide 2D information, which is insufficient for in vivo dose reconstruction. We propose real-time volumetric imaging using prior knowledge of pre-treatment 4D images and real-time 2D transit data of treatment beam and kV beam. Methods: The pre-treatment multi-snapshot volumetric images are used to simulate 2D projections of both the treatment beam and kV beam, respectively, for each treatment field defined by the control point. During radiation delivery, the transitmore » signals acquired by the electronic portal image device (EPID) are processed for every projection and compared with pre-calculation by cross-correlation for phase matching and thus 3D snapshot identification or real-time volumetric imaging. The data processing involves taking logarithmic ratios of EPID signals with respect to the air scan to reduce modeling uncertainties in head scatter fluence and EPID response. Simulated 2D projections are also used to pre-calculate confidence levels in phase matching. Treatment beam projections that have a low confidence level either in pre-calculation or real-time acquisition will trigger kV beams so that complementary information can be exploited. In case both the treatment beam and kV beam return low confidence in phase matching, a predicted phase based on linear regression will be generated. Results: Simulation studies indicated treatment beams provide sufficient confidence in phase matching for most cases. At times of low confidence from treatment beams, kV imaging provides sufficient confidence in phase matching due to its complementary configuration. Conclusion: The proposed real-time volumetric imaging utilizes the treatment beam and triggers kV beams for complementary information when the treatment beam along does not provide sufficient confidence for phase matching. This strategy minimizes the use of extra radiation to patients. This project is partially supported by a Varian MRA grant.« less
  • Purpose: In searching for a robust, efficient and cost-effective dual energy cone beam CT (DECBCT) solution for various radiation oncology applications, in particularly for improved proton dose planning/replanning accuracy and DE-CBCT guided radiation therapy, we investigate a novel energy modulation scheme using a beam modifier placed between the source and patient and optimize its geometric configuration for routine clinical use. Methods: The study was performed using a Hitachi CBCT scanner and the tube voltage was set at 125 kVp. The higher energy beam was obtained by filtering the incident utilizing a beam modulation layer (material: copper, thickness: 1.8 mm). Tomore » avoid the need for double scans (one with and one without the energy modulator), the modulation layer was configured to cover only the half of the X-ray beam so that two sets of sinograms corresponding low and high energies were collected after a single gantry rotation of 360 deg. The average high energy and low energy HU numbers (HUhigh and HUlow) were derived for pixels in a defined region-of-interest, respectively. Results: The beam modifier increased the threshold of the energy spectrum from ∼20 keV up to ∼50 keV. Two complete sets of images were obtained with good alignment between the high energy and low-energy cases without any artifact observed (Fig. 2). The HUlow/HUhigh is ∼0/0 (water), ∼394/238 (brain), ∼1283/1085 (cortical bone) and ∼3000/1800 (titanium). Conclusion: The feasibility of the proposed DECT implementation using a beam modifier has been demonstrated. Compared to the existing DECT solutions, the proposed scheme is much more cost-effective and requires minimum hardware modification. The work lays foundation for us to study the quantification of HU values to derive material density images and atomic number (and electron density) of substances.« less
  • Purpose: X-ray scatter photons result in significant image quality degradation of cone-beam CT (CBCT). Measurement based algorithms using beam blocker directly acquire the scatter samples and achieve significant improvement on the quality of CBCT image. Within existing algorithms, single-scan and stationary beam blocker proposed previously is promising due to its simplicity and practicability. Although demonstrated effectively on tabletop system, the blocker fails to estimate the scatter distribution on clinical CBCT system mainly due to the gantry wobble. In addition, the uniform distributed blocker strips in our previous design results in primary data loss in the CBCT system and leads tomore » the image artifacts due to data insufficiency. Methods: We investigate the motion behavior of the beam blocker in each projection and design an optimized non-uniform blocker strip distribution which accounts for the data insufficiency issue. An accurate scatter estimation is then achieved from the wobble modeling. Blocker wobble curve is estimated using threshold-based segmentation algorithms in each projection. In the blocker design optimization, the quality of final image is quantified using the number of the primary data loss voxels and the mesh adaptive direct search algorithm is applied to minimize the objective function. Scatter-corrected CT images are obtained using the optimized blocker. Results: The proposed method is evaluated using Catphan@504 phantom and a head patient. On the Catphan©504, our approach reduces the average CT number error from 115 Hounsfield unit (HU) to 11 HU in the selected regions of interest, and improves the image contrast by a factor of 1.45 in the high-contrast regions. On the head patient, the CT number error is reduced from 97 HU to 6 HU in the soft tissue region and image spatial non-uniformity is decreased from 27% to 5% after correction. Conclusion: The proposed optimized blocker design is practical and attractive for CBCT guided radiation therapy. This work is supported by grants from Guangdong Innovative Research Team Program of China (Grant No. 2011S013), National 863 Programs of China (Grant Nos. 2012AA02A604 and 2015AA043203), the National High-tech R&D Program for Young Scientists by the Ministry of Science and Technology of China (Grant No. 2015AA020917)« less