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Title: SU-F-J-45: Sparing Normal Tissue with Ultra-High Dose Rate in Radiation Therapy

Abstract

Purpose: To spare normal tissue by reducing the location uncertainty of a moving target, we proposed an ultra-high dose rate system and evaluated. Methods: High energy electrons generated with a linear accelerator were injected into a storage ring to be accumulated. The number of the electrons in the ring was determined based on the prescribed radiation dose. The dose was delivered within a millisecond, when an online imaging system found that the target was in the position that was consistent with that in a treatment plan. In such a short time period, the displacement of the target was negligible. The margin added to the clinical target volume (CTV) could be reduced that was evaluated by comparing of volumes between CTV and ITV in 14 cases of lung stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) treatments. A design of the ultra-high dose rate system was evaluated based clinical needs and the recent developments of low energy (a few MeV) electron storage ring. Results: This design of ultra-high dose rate system was feasible based on the techniques currently available. The reduction of a target volume was significant by reducing the margin that accounted the motion of the target. ∼50% volume reduction of the internalmore » target volume (ITV) could be achieved in lung SBRT treatments. Conclusion: With this innovation of ultra-high dose rate system, the margin of target is able to be significantly reduced. It will reduce treatment time of gating and allow precisely specified gating window to improve the accuracy of dose delivering.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. DCH Reg. Medical Center, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22632177
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; ACCURACY; ANIMAL TISSUES; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; DOSE RATES; LINEAR ACCELERATORS; LUNGS; RADIATION DOSES; RADIOTHERAPY

Citation Formats

Feng, Y. SU-F-J-45: Sparing Normal Tissue with Ultra-High Dose Rate in Radiation Therapy. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4955953.
Feng, Y. SU-F-J-45: Sparing Normal Tissue with Ultra-High Dose Rate in Radiation Therapy. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4955953.
Feng, Y. 2016. "SU-F-J-45: Sparing Normal Tissue with Ultra-High Dose Rate in Radiation Therapy". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4955953.
@article{osti_22632177,
title = {SU-F-J-45: Sparing Normal Tissue with Ultra-High Dose Rate in Radiation Therapy},
author = {Feng, Y},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To spare normal tissue by reducing the location uncertainty of a moving target, we proposed an ultra-high dose rate system and evaluated. Methods: High energy electrons generated with a linear accelerator were injected into a storage ring to be accumulated. The number of the electrons in the ring was determined based on the prescribed radiation dose. The dose was delivered within a millisecond, when an online imaging system found that the target was in the position that was consistent with that in a treatment plan. In such a short time period, the displacement of the target was negligible. The margin added to the clinical target volume (CTV) could be reduced that was evaluated by comparing of volumes between CTV and ITV in 14 cases of lung stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) treatments. A design of the ultra-high dose rate system was evaluated based clinical needs and the recent developments of low energy (a few MeV) electron storage ring. Results: This design of ultra-high dose rate system was feasible based on the techniques currently available. The reduction of a target volume was significant by reducing the margin that accounted the motion of the target. ∼50% volume reduction of the internal target volume (ITV) could be achieved in lung SBRT treatments. Conclusion: With this innovation of ultra-high dose rate system, the margin of target is able to be significantly reduced. It will reduce treatment time of gating and allow precisely specified gating window to improve the accuracy of dose delivering.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4955953},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Purpose: To investigate how the selection of ion type affects the calculated isoeffective dose to the surrounding normal tissue as a function of both normal tissue and target tissue {alpha}/{beta} ratios. Methods and Materials: A microdosimetric biologic dose model was incorporated into a Geant4 simulation of parallel opposed beams of protons, helium, lithium, beryllium, carbon, and neon ions. The beams were constructed to give a homogeneous isoeffective dose to a volume in the center of a water phantom for target tissues covering a range of cobalt equivalent {alpha}/{beta} ratios of 1-20 Gy. Concomitant normal tissue isoeffective doses in the plateaumore » of the ion beam were then compared for different ions across the range of normal tissue and target tissue radiosensitivities for a fixed isoeffective dose to the target tissue. Results: The ion type yielding the optimal normal tissue sparing was highly dependent on the {alpha}/{beta} ratio of both the normal and the target tissue. For carbon ions, the calculated isoeffective dose to normal tissue at a 5-cm depth varied by almost a factor of 5, depending on the {alpha}/{beta} ratios of the normal and target tissue. This ranges from a factor of 2 less than the isoeffective dose of a similar proton treatment to a factor of 2 greater. Conclusions: No single ion is optimal for all treatment scenarios. The heavier ions are superior in cases in which the {alpha}/{beta} ratio of the target tissue is low and the {alpha}/{beta} ratio of normal tissue is high, and protons are superior in the opposite circumstances. Lithium and beryllium appear to offer dose advantages similar to carbon, with a considerably lower normal tissue dose when the {alpha}/{beta} ratio in the target tissue is high and the {alpha}/{beta} ratio in the normal tissue is low.« less
  • Purpose: To determine the influence of target-volume expansion on the reduction in small-bowel dose achieved with use of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) vs. standard conformal treatment of the pelvis after hysterectomy, and to investigate the influence of patient body habitus on the normal-tissue sparing achieved with use of IMRT. Methods and Materials: A clinical target volume (CTV) was contoured on each of 10 planning computed tomography scans of patients who had been treated for cervical or endometrial cancer after a hysterectomy. Treatment planning was based on vaginal CTVs and regional nodal CTVs. To account for internal motion, margins were addedmore » to form an initial planning target volume (PTVA) as follows: 0.0 mm were added to the regional nodal CTV; 10 mm were added anteriorly to the vaginal CTV; and 5 mm were added to the vaginal CTV in all other directions. Two further PTVs (PTVB and PTVC) were produced by a 5-mm expansion of PTVA to give PTVB and a further 5-mm expansion to give PTVC. Treatment plans for all 3 PTVs were produced by use of 2 conformal fields (2FC), 4 conformal fields (4FC), or IMRT to deliver 45 Gy to more than 97% of the PTV. The primary goal of IMRT was to spare small bowel. The change in sparing that accompanied the increase in margin size was assessed by comparison of dose-volume histograms that resulted from PTVA, PTVB, and PTVC. Measured patient dimensions were correlated with bowel sparing. Results: Significantly less small bowel was irradiated by IMRT than by 2FC (p < 0.0001) or 4FC (p < 0.0001) for doses greater than 25 Gy. Significantly less rectum was irradiated by IMRT than by 2FC (p < 0.0001) or 4FC (p < 0.0001). Significantly less bladder was irradiated by IMRT than by 2FC (p < 0.0001). However, the magnitude of the sparing achieved by use of IMRT decreased as margins increased. In particular, the volume of small bowel spared by IMRT vs. 2FC or 4FC decreased as margin size increased (p = 0.0002 and p = 0.008 for 2FC and 4FC, respectively). The amount of normal-tissue sparing achieved by use of IMRT vs. 4FC was inversely correlated with patient body mass index. Conclusion: Because the small-bowel sparing achieved with use of IMRT is markedly reduced by relatively small expansions of the target volume, accurate target delineation, highly reproducible patient immobilization, and a clear understanding of internal-organ motion are needed to achieve optimal advantage in the use of IMRT over conventional methods of posthysterectomy pelvic radiation therapy.« less
  • Purpose: To compare normal lung-sparing capabilities of three advanced radiation therapy techniques for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC). Methods: Four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) was performed in 10 patients with stage IIIb LA-NSCLC. The internal target volume (ITV); planning target volume (PTV); and organs at risks (OARs) such as spinal cord, total normal lung, heart, and esophagus were delineated for each CT data set. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), Tomohelical-IMRT (TH-IMRT), and TomoDirect-IMRT (TD-IMRT) plans were generated (total prescribed dose, 66 Gy in 33 fractions to the PTV) for each patient. To reduce the normal lung dose, complete and directionalmore » block function was applied outside the normal lung far from the target for both TH-IMRT and TD-IMRT, while pseudo- OAR was set in the same region for IMRT. Dosimetric characteristics of the three plans were compared in terms of target coverage, the sparing capability for the OAR, and the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). Beam delivery efficiency was also compared. Results: TH-IMRT and TD-IMRT provided better target coverage than IMRT plans. Lung volume receiving ≥–30 Gy, mean dose, and NTCP were significant with TH-IMRT than with IMRT (p=0.006), and volume receiving ≥20–30 Gy was lower in TD-IMRT than in IMRT (p<0.05). Compared with IMRT, TH-IMRT had better sparing effect on the spinal cord (Dmax, NTCP) and heart (V45) (p<0.05). NTCP for the spinal cord, V45 and V60 for the heart, and Dmax for the esophagus were significantly lower in TD-IMRT than in IMRT. The monitor units per fraction were clearly smaller for IMRT than for TH-IMRT and TD-IMRT (p=0.006). Conclusion: In LA-NSCLC, TH-IMRT gave superior PTV coverage and OAR sparing compared to IMRT. TH-IMRT provided better control of the lung volume receiving ≥5–30 Gy. The delivery time and monitor units were lower in TD-IMRT than in TH-IMRT.« less
  • Purpose: To compare dose volume histograms of intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) with those of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and passive scattering proton therapy (PSPT) for the treatment of stage IIIB non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and to explore the possibility of individualized radical radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Dose volume histograms designed to deliver IMRT at 60 to 63 Gy, PSPT at 74 Gy, and IMPT at the same doses were compared and the use of individualized radical radiotherapy was assessed in patients with extensive stage IIIB NSCLC (n = 10 patients for each approach). These patients were selected based on theirmore » extensive disease and were considered to have no or borderline tolerance to IMRT at 60 to 63 Gy, based on the dose to normal tissue volume constraints (lung volume receiving 20 Gy [V20] of <35%, total mean lung dose <20 Gy; spinal cord dose, <45 Gy). The possibility of increasing the total tumor dose with IMPT for each patient without exceeding the dose volume constraints (maximum tolerated dose [MTD]) was also investigated. Results: Compared with IMRT, IMPT spared more lung, heart, spinal cord, and esophagus, even with dose escalation from 63 Gy to 83.5 Gy, with a mean MTD of 74 Gy. Compared with PSPT, IMPT allowed further dose escalation from 74 Gy to a mean MTD of 84.4 Gy (range, 79.4-88.4 Gy) while all parameters of normal tissue sparing were kept at lower or similar levels. In addition, IMPT prevented lower-dose target coverage in patients with complicated tumor anatomies. Conclusions: IMPT reduces the dose to normal tissue and allows individualized radical radiotherapy for extensive stage IIIB NSCLC.« less
  • The development of a hospital-based proton-beam therapy system at Loma Linda University Medical Center is one step of a historical trend toward more precise radiation therapy. It exploits available technology and, in doing so, may point the way toward other, similar facilities; it is hoped that it may also point the way to true selective cell irradiation. In its present form it offers patients an opportunity for effective cancer control with reduced side effects. As an instrument of precision, it allows for physical, radiobiological, and clinical investigations not previously attainable and is, therefore, intended as a worldwide resource as wellmore » as a treatment center. As research accumulates and results are published, a better-defined role for proton-beam radiation therapy is expected to become apparent and further exploitation of protons most likely will be undertaken. The Loma Linda facility, then, represents not so much a culmination as a beginning. 43 refs., 10 figs.« less