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Title: SU-F-I-16: Short Breast MRI with High-Resolution T2-Weighted and Dynamic Contrast Enhanced T1-Weighted Images

Abstract

Purpose: To develop and demonstrate a short breast (sb) MRI protocol that acquires both T2-weighted and dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images in approximately ten minutes. Methods: The sb-MRI protocol consists of two novel pulse sequences. The first is a flexible fast spin-echo triple-echo Dixon (FTED) sequence for high-resolution fat-suppressed T2-weighted imaging, and the second is a 3D fast dual-echo spoiled gradient sequence (FLEX) for volumetric fat-suppressed T1-weighted imaging before and post contrast agent injection. The flexible FTED sequence replaces each single readout during every echo-spacing period of FSE with three fast-switching bipolar readouts to produce three raw images in a single acquisition. These three raw images are then post-processed using a Dixon algorithm to generate separate water-only and fat-only images. The FLEX sequence acquires two echoes using dual-echo readout after each RF excitation and the corresponding images are post-processed using a similar Dixon algorithm to yield water-only and fat-only images. The sb-MRI protocol was implemented on a 3T MRI scanner and used for patients who had undergone concurrent clinical MRI for breast cancer screening. Results: With the same scan parameters (eg, spatial coverage, field of view, spatial and temporal resolution) as the clinical protocol, the total scan-time of the sb-MRI protocolmore » (including the localizer, bilateral T2-weighted, and dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images) was 11 minutes. In comparison, the clinical breast MRI protocol took 43 minutes. Uniform fat suppression and high image quality were consistently achieved by sb-MRI. Conclusion: We demonstrated a sb-MRI protocol comprising both T2-weighted and dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images can be performed in approximately ten minutes. The spatial and temporal resolution of the images easily satisfies the current breast MRI accreditation guidelines by the American College of Radiology. The protocol has the potential of making breast MRI more widely accessible to and more tolerable by the patients. JMA is the inventor of United States patents that are owned by the University of Texas Board of Regents and currently licensed to GE Healthcare and Siemens Gmbh.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;  [1]; ;  [2]
  1. UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)
  2. GE Healthcare Technologies, Waukesha, Wisconsin (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22626788
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; ALGORITHMS; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; CONTRAST MEDIA; EXCITATION; IMAGES; MAMMARY GLANDS; NEOPLASMS; NMR IMAGING; PATENTS; PATIENTS; READOUT SYSTEMS

Citation Formats

Ma, J, Son, J, Arun, B, Hazle, J, Hwang, K, Madewell, J, Yang, W, Dogan, B, Wang, K, and Bayram, E. SU-F-I-16: Short Breast MRI with High-Resolution T2-Weighted and Dynamic Contrast Enhanced T1-Weighted Images. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4955844.
Ma, J, Son, J, Arun, B, Hazle, J, Hwang, K, Madewell, J, Yang, W, Dogan, B, Wang, K, & Bayram, E. SU-F-I-16: Short Breast MRI with High-Resolution T2-Weighted and Dynamic Contrast Enhanced T1-Weighted Images. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4955844.
Ma, J, Son, J, Arun, B, Hazle, J, Hwang, K, Madewell, J, Yang, W, Dogan, B, Wang, K, and Bayram, E. 2016. "SU-F-I-16: Short Breast MRI with High-Resolution T2-Weighted and Dynamic Contrast Enhanced T1-Weighted Images". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4955844.
@article{osti_22626788,
title = {SU-F-I-16: Short Breast MRI with High-Resolution T2-Weighted and Dynamic Contrast Enhanced T1-Weighted Images},
author = {Ma, J and Son, J and Arun, B and Hazle, J and Hwang, K and Madewell, J and Yang, W and Dogan, B and Wang, K and Bayram, E},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To develop and demonstrate a short breast (sb) MRI protocol that acquires both T2-weighted and dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images in approximately ten minutes. Methods: The sb-MRI protocol consists of two novel pulse sequences. The first is a flexible fast spin-echo triple-echo Dixon (FTED) sequence for high-resolution fat-suppressed T2-weighted imaging, and the second is a 3D fast dual-echo spoiled gradient sequence (FLEX) for volumetric fat-suppressed T1-weighted imaging before and post contrast agent injection. The flexible FTED sequence replaces each single readout during every echo-spacing period of FSE with three fast-switching bipolar readouts to produce three raw images in a single acquisition. These three raw images are then post-processed using a Dixon algorithm to generate separate water-only and fat-only images. The FLEX sequence acquires two echoes using dual-echo readout after each RF excitation and the corresponding images are post-processed using a similar Dixon algorithm to yield water-only and fat-only images. The sb-MRI protocol was implemented on a 3T MRI scanner and used for patients who had undergone concurrent clinical MRI for breast cancer screening. Results: With the same scan parameters (eg, spatial coverage, field of view, spatial and temporal resolution) as the clinical protocol, the total scan-time of the sb-MRI protocol (including the localizer, bilateral T2-weighted, and dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images) was 11 minutes. In comparison, the clinical breast MRI protocol took 43 minutes. Uniform fat suppression and high image quality were consistently achieved by sb-MRI. Conclusion: We demonstrated a sb-MRI protocol comprising both T2-weighted and dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images can be performed in approximately ten minutes. The spatial and temporal resolution of the images easily satisfies the current breast MRI accreditation guidelines by the American College of Radiology. The protocol has the potential of making breast MRI more widely accessible to and more tolerable by the patients. JMA is the inventor of United States patents that are owned by the University of Texas Board of Regents and currently licensed to GE Healthcare and Siemens Gmbh.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4955844},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of using classic textural feature extraction in radiotherapy response assessment, we studied a unique cohort of early stage breast cancer patients with paired pre - and post-radiation Diffusion Weighted MRI (DWI-MRI) and Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI). Methods: 15 female patients from our prospective phase I trial evaluating preoperative radiotherapy were included in this retrospective study. Each patient received a single-fraction radiation treatment, and DWI and DCE scans were conducted before and after the radiotherapy. DWI scans were acquired using a spin-echo EPI sequence with diffusion weighting factors of b = 0 and b =more » 500 mm{sup 2} /s, and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps were calculated. DCE-MRI scans were acquired using a T{sub 1}-weighted 3D SPGR sequence with a temporal resolution of about 1 minute. The contrast agent (CA) was intravenously injected with a 0.1 mmol/kg bodyweight dose at 2 ml/s. Two parameters, volume transfer constant (K{sup trans} ) and k{sub ep} were analyzed using the two-compartment Tofts kinetic model. For DCE parametric maps and ADC maps, 33 textural features were generated from the clinical target volume (CTV) in a 3D fashion using the classic gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCOM) and gray level run length matrix (GLRLM). Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to determine the significance of each texture feature’s change after the radiotherapy. The significance was set to 0.05 with Bonferroni correction. Results: For ADC maps calculated from DWI-MRI, 24 out of 33 CTV features changed significantly after the radiotherapy. For DCE-MRI pharmacokinetic parameters, all 33 CTV features of K{sup trans} and 33 features of k{sub ep} changed significantly. Conclusion: Initial results indicate that those significantly changed classic texture features are sensitive to radiation-induced changes and can be used for assessment of radiotherapy response in breast cancer.« less
  • Purpose: To compare contrast-enhanced, T1-weighted, three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (CEMR) and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (T2MR) with computed tomography (CT) for prostate brachytherapy seed location for dosimetric calculations. Methods and Materials: Postbrachytherapy prostate MRI was performed on a 1.5 Tesla unit with combined surface and endorectal coils in 13 patients. Both CEMR and T2MR used a section thickness of 3 mm. Spiral CT used a section thickness of 5 mm with a pitch factor of 1.5. All images were obtained in the transverse plane. Two readers using CT and MR imaging assessed brachytherapy seed distribution independently. The dependency of datamore » read by both readers for a specific subject was assessed with a linear mixed effects model. Results: The mean percentage ({+-} standard deviation) values of the readers for seed detection and location are presented. Of 1205 implanted seeds, CEMR, T2MR, and CT detected 91.5% {+-} 4.8%, 78.5% {+-} 8.5%, and 96.1% {+-} 2.3%, respectively, with 11.8% {+-} 4.5%, 8.5% {+-} 3.5%, 1.9% {+-} 1.0% extracapsular, respectively. Assignment to periprostatic structures was not possible with CT. Periprostatic seed assignments for CEMR and T2MR, respectively, were as follows: neurovascular bundle, 3.5% {+-} 1.6% and 2.1% {+-} 0.9%; seminal vesicles, 0.9% {+-} 1.8% and 0.3% {+-} 0.7%; periurethral, 7.1% {+-} 3.3% and 5.8% {+-} 2.9%; penile bulb, 0.6% {+-} 0.8% and 0.3% {+-} 0.6%; Denonvillier's Fascia/rectal wall, 0.5% {+-} 0.6% and 0%; and urinary bladder, 0.1% {+-} 0.3% and 0%. Data dependency analysis showed statistical significance for the type of imaging but not for reader identification. Conclusion: Both enumeration and localization of implanted seeds are readily accomplished with CEMR. Calculations with MRI dosimetry do not require CT data. Dose determinations to specific extracapsular sites can be obtained with MRI but not with CT.« less
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