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Title: SU-D-206-06: Task-Specific Optimization of Scintillator Thickness for CMOS-Detector Based Cone-Beam Breast CT

Abstract

Purpose: To optimize the cesium iodide (CsI:Tl) scintillator thickness in a complimentary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS)-based detector for use in dedicated cone-beam breast CT. Methods: The imaging task considered was the detection of a microcalcification cluster comprising six 220µm diameter calcium carbonate spheres, arranged in the form of a regular pentagon with 2 mm spacing on its sides and a central calcification, similar to that in ACR-recommended mammography accreditation phantom, at a mean glandular dose of 4.5 mGy. Generalized parallel-cascades based linear systems analysis was used to determine Fourier-domain image quality metrics in reconstructed object space, from which the detectability index inclusive of anatomical noise was determined for a non-prewhitening numerical observer. For 300 projections over 2π, magnification-associated focal-spot blur, Monte Carlo derived x-ray scatter, K-fluorescent emission and reabsorption within CsI:Tl, CsI:Tl quantum efficiency and optical blur, fiberoptic plate transmission efficiency and blur, CMOS quantum efficiency, pixel aperture function and additive noise, and filtered back-projection to isotropic 105µm voxel pitch with bilinear interpolation were modeled. Imaging geometry of a clinical prototype breast CT system, a 60 kV Cu/Al filtered x-ray spectrum from 0.3 mm focal spot incident on a 14 cm diameter semi-ellipsoidal breast were used to determine the detectability indexmore » for 300–600 µm thick (75µm increments) CsI:Tl. The CsI:Tl thickness that maximized the detectability index was considered optimal. Results: The limiting resolution (10% modulation transfer function, MTF) progressively decreased with increasing CsI:Tl thickness. The zero-frequency detective quantum efficiency, DQE(0), in projection space increased with increasing CsI:Tl thickness. The maximum detectability index was achieved with 525µm thick CsI:Tl scintillator. Reduced MTF at mid-to-high frequencies for 600µm thick CsI:Tl lowered the detectability index than 525µm CsI:Tl. Conclusion: For the x-ray spectrum and imaging conditions considered, a 525µm thick CsI:Tl scintillator integrated with the CMOS detector is optimal for detecting microcalcification cluster. Funding support: Supported in part by NIH R01 CA195512. The contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not reflect the official views of the NIH or the NCI. Disclosures: SV, GV and AK - Research collaboration, Koning Corp., West Henrietta, NY.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22624404
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; CESIUM IODIDES; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; FLUORESCENCE; INTERPOLATION; MAMMARY GLANDS; MONTE CARLO METHOD; PHANTOMS; QUANTUM EFFICIENCY; SEMICONDUCTOR MATERIALS; THICKNESS; TRANSFER FUNCTIONS; X-RAY SPECTRA

Citation Formats

Vedantham, S, Shrestha, S, Shi, L, Vijayaraghavan, G, and Karellas, A. SU-D-206-06: Task-Specific Optimization of Scintillator Thickness for CMOS-Detector Based Cone-Beam Breast CT. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4955660.
Vedantham, S, Shrestha, S, Shi, L, Vijayaraghavan, G, & Karellas, A. SU-D-206-06: Task-Specific Optimization of Scintillator Thickness for CMOS-Detector Based Cone-Beam Breast CT. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4955660.
Vedantham, S, Shrestha, S, Shi, L, Vijayaraghavan, G, and Karellas, A. 2016. "SU-D-206-06: Task-Specific Optimization of Scintillator Thickness for CMOS-Detector Based Cone-Beam Breast CT". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4955660.
@article{osti_22624404,
title = {SU-D-206-06: Task-Specific Optimization of Scintillator Thickness for CMOS-Detector Based Cone-Beam Breast CT},
author = {Vedantham, S and Shrestha, S and Shi, L and Vijayaraghavan, G and Karellas, A},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To optimize the cesium iodide (CsI:Tl) scintillator thickness in a complimentary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS)-based detector for use in dedicated cone-beam breast CT. Methods: The imaging task considered was the detection of a microcalcification cluster comprising six 220µm diameter calcium carbonate spheres, arranged in the form of a regular pentagon with 2 mm spacing on its sides and a central calcification, similar to that in ACR-recommended mammography accreditation phantom, at a mean glandular dose of 4.5 mGy. Generalized parallel-cascades based linear systems analysis was used to determine Fourier-domain image quality metrics in reconstructed object space, from which the detectability index inclusive of anatomical noise was determined for a non-prewhitening numerical observer. For 300 projections over 2π, magnification-associated focal-spot blur, Monte Carlo derived x-ray scatter, K-fluorescent emission and reabsorption within CsI:Tl, CsI:Tl quantum efficiency and optical blur, fiberoptic plate transmission efficiency and blur, CMOS quantum efficiency, pixel aperture function and additive noise, and filtered back-projection to isotropic 105µm voxel pitch with bilinear interpolation were modeled. Imaging geometry of a clinical prototype breast CT system, a 60 kV Cu/Al filtered x-ray spectrum from 0.3 mm focal spot incident on a 14 cm diameter semi-ellipsoidal breast were used to determine the detectability index for 300–600 µm thick (75µm increments) CsI:Tl. The CsI:Tl thickness that maximized the detectability index was considered optimal. Results: The limiting resolution (10% modulation transfer function, MTF) progressively decreased with increasing CsI:Tl thickness. The zero-frequency detective quantum efficiency, DQE(0), in projection space increased with increasing CsI:Tl thickness. The maximum detectability index was achieved with 525µm thick CsI:Tl scintillator. Reduced MTF at mid-to-high frequencies for 600µm thick CsI:Tl lowered the detectability index than 525µm CsI:Tl. Conclusion: For the x-ray spectrum and imaging conditions considered, a 525µm thick CsI:Tl scintillator integrated with the CMOS detector is optimal for detecting microcalcification cluster. Funding support: Supported in part by NIH R01 CA195512. The contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not reflect the official views of the NIH or the NCI. Disclosures: SV, GV and AK - Research collaboration, Koning Corp., West Henrietta, NY.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4955660},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Purpose: To measure and investigate the improvement of microcalcification (MC) visibility in cone beam breast CT with a high pitch (75 μm), thick (500 μm) scintillator CMOS/CsI flat panel detector (Dexela 2923, Perkin Elmer).Methods: Aluminum wires and calcium carbonate grains of various sizes were embedded in a paraffin cylinder to simulate imaging of calcifications in a breast. Phantoms were imaged with a benchtop experimental cone beam CT system at various exposure levels. In addition to the Dexela detector, a high pitch (50 μm), thin (150 μm) scintillator CMOS/CsI flat panel detector (C7921CA-09, Hamamatsu Corporation, Hamamatsu City, Japan) and a widelymore » used low pitch (194 μm), thick (600 μm) scintillator aSi/CsI flat panel detector (PaxScan 4030CB, Varian Medical Systems) were also used in scanning for comparison. The images were independently reviewed by six readers (imaging physicists). The MC visibility was quantified as the fraction of visible MCs and measured as a function of the estimated mean glandular dose (MGD) level for various MC sizes and detectors. The modulation transfer functions (MTFs) and detective quantum efficiencies (DQEs) were also measured and compared for the three detectors used.Results: The authors have demonstrated that the use of a high pitch (75 μm) CMOS detector coupled with a thick (500 μm) CsI scintillator helped make the smaller 150–160, 160–180, and 180–200 μm MC groups more visible at MGDs up to 10.8, 9, and 10.8 mGy, respectively. It also made the larger 200–212 and 212–224 μm MC groups more visible at MGDs up to 7.2 mGy. No performance improvement was observed for 224–250 μm or larger size groups. With the higher spatial resolution of the Dexela detector based system, the apparent dimensions and shapes of MCs were more accurately rendered. The results show that with the aforementioned detector, a 73% visibility could be achieved in imaging 160–180 μm MCs as compared to 28% visibility achieved by the low pitch (194 μm) aSi/CsI flat panel detector. The measurements confirm that the Hamamatsu detector has the highest MTF, followed by the Dexel detector, and then the Varian detector. However, the Dexela detector, with its thick (500 μm) CsI scintillator and low noise level, has the highest DQE at all frequencies, followed by the Varian detector, and then the Hamamatsu detector. The findings on the MC visibility correlated well with the differences in MTFs, noise power spectra, and DQEs measured for these three detectors.Conclusions: The authors have demonstrated that the use of the CMOS type Dexela detector with its high pitch (75 μm) and thick (500 μm) CsI scintillator could help improve the MC visibility. However, the improvement depended on the exposure level and the MC size. For imaging larger MCs or scanning at high exposure levels, there was little advantage in using the Dexela detector as compared to the aSi type Varian detector. These findings correlate well with the higher measured DQEs of the Dexela detector, especially at higher frequencies.« less
  • Purpose: This work applies a cascaded systems model for cone-beam CT imaging performance to the design and optimization of a system for musculoskeletal extremity imaging. The model provides a quantitative guide to the selection of system geometry, source and detector components, acquisition techniques, and reconstruction parameters. Methods: The model is based on cascaded systems analysis of the 3D noise-power spectrum (NPS) and noise-equivalent quanta (NEQ) combined with factors of system geometry (magnification, focal spot size, and scatter-to-primary ratio) and anatomical background clutter. The model was extended to task-based analysis of detectability index (d') for tasks ranging in contrast and frequencymore » content, and d' was computed as a function of system magnification, detector pixel size, focal spot size, kVp, dose, electronic noise, voxel size, and reconstruction filter to examine trade-offs and optima among such factors in multivariate analysis. The model was tested quantitatively versus the measured NPS and qualitatively in cadaver images as a function of kVp, dose, pixel size, and reconstruction filter under conditions corresponding to the proposed scanner. Results: The analysis quantified trade-offs among factors of spatial resolution, noise, and dose. System magnification (M) was a critical design parameter with strong effect on spatial resolution, dose, and x-ray scatter, and a fairly robust optimum was identified at M {approx} 1.3 for the imaging tasks considered. The results suggested kVp selection in the range of {approx}65-90 kVp, the lower end (65 kVp) maximizing subject contrast and the upper end maximizing NEQ (90 kVp). The analysis quantified fairly intuitive results--e.g., {approx}0.1-0.2 mm pixel size (and a sharp reconstruction filter) optimal for high-frequency tasks (bone detail) compared to {approx}0.4 mm pixel size (and a smooth reconstruction filter) for low-frequency (soft-tissue) tasks. This result suggests a specific protocol for 1 x 1 (full-resolution) projection data acquisition followed by full-resolution reconstruction with a sharp filter for high-frequency tasks along with 2 x 2 binning reconstruction with a smooth filter for low-frequency tasks. The analysis guided selection of specific source and detector components implemented on the proposed scanner. The analysis also quantified the potential benefits and points of diminishing return in focal spot size, reduced electronic noise, finer detector pixels, and low-dose limits of detectability. Theoretical results agreed quantitatively with the measured NPS and qualitatively with evaluation of cadaver images by a musculoskeletal radiologist. Conclusions: A fairly comprehensive model for 3D imaging performance in cone-beam CT combines factors of quantum noise, system geometry, anatomical background, and imaging task. The analysis provided a valuable, quantitative guide to design, optimization, and technique selection for a musculoskeletal extremities imaging system under development.« less
  • Purpose: Extremity cone-beam CT (CBCT) with an amorphous silicon (aSi) flat-panel detector (FPD) provides low-dose volumetric imaging with high spatial resolution. We investigate the performance of the newer complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) detectors to enhance resolution of extremities CBCT to ∼0.1 mm, enabling morphological analysis of trabecular bone. Quantitative in-vivo imaging of bone microarchitecture could present an important advance for osteoporosis and osteoarthritis diagnosis and therapy assessment. Methods: Cascaded systems models of CMOS- and FPD-based extremities CBCT were implemented. Performance was compared for a range of pixel sizes (0.05–0.4 mm), focal spot sizes (0.3–0.6 FS), and x-ray techniques (0.05–0.8 mAs/projection)more » using detectability of high-, low-, and all-frequency tasks for a nonprewhitening observer. Test-bench implementation of CMOS-based extremity CBCT involved a Teledyne DALSA Xineos3030HR detector with 0.099 mm pixels and a compact rotating anode x-ray source with 0.3 FS (IMD RTM37). Metrics of bone morphology obtained using CMOS-based CBCT were compared in cadaveric specimens to FPD-based system using a Varian PaxScan4030 (0.194 mm pixels). Results: Finer pixel size and reduced electronic noise for CMOS (136 e compared to 2000 e for FPD) resulted in ∼1.9× increase in detectability for high-frequency tasks and ∼1.1× increase for all-frequency tasks. Incorporation of the new x-ray source with reduced focal spot size (0.3 FS vs. 0.5 FS used on current extremities CBCT) improved detectability for CMOS-based CBCT by ∼1.7× for high-frequency tasks. Compared to FPD CBCT, the CMOS detector yielded improved agreement with micro-CT in measurements of trabecular thickness (∼1.7× reduction in relative error), bone volume (∼1.5× reduction), and trabecular spacing (∼3.5× reduction). Conclusion: Imaging performance modelling and experimentation indicate substantial improvements for high-frequency imaging tasks through adoption of the CMOS detector and small FS x-ray source, motivating the use of these components in a new system for quantitative in-vivo imaging of trabecular bone. Financial Support: US NIH grant R01EB018896. Qian Cao is a Howard Hughes Medical Institute International Student Research Fellow. Disclosures: W Zbijewski, J Siewerdsen and A Sisniega receive research funding from Carestream Health.« less
  • Purpose: To determine the mean and range of location-averaged breast skin thickness using high-resolution dedicated breast CT for use in Monte Carlo-based estimation of normalized glandular dose coefficients. Methods: This study retrospectively analyzed image data from a clinical study investigating dedicated breast CT. An algorithm similar to that described by Huang et al.['The effect of skin thickness determined using breast CT on mammographic dosimetry,' Med. Phys. 35(4), 1199-1206 (2008)] was used to determine the skin thickness in 137 dedicated breast CT volumes from 136 women. The location-averaged mean breast skin thickness for each breast was estimated and the study populationmore » mean and range were determined. Pathology results were available for 132 women, and were used to investigate if the distribution of location-averaged mean breast skin thickness varied with pathology. The effect of surface fitting to account for breast curvature was also studied. Results: The study mean ({+-} interbreast SD) for breast skin thickness was 1.44 {+-} 0.25 mm (range: 0.87-2.34 mm), which was in excellent agreement with Huang et al. Based on pathology, pair-wise statistical analysis (Mann-Whitney test) indicated that at the 0.05 significance level, there were no significant difference in the location-averaged mean breast skin thickness distributions between the groups: benign vs malignant (p= 0.223), benign vs hyperplasia (p= 0.651), hyperplasia vs malignant (p= 0.229), and malignant vs nonmalignant (p= 0.172). Conclusions: Considering this study used a different clinical prototype system, and the study participants were from a different geographical location, the observed agreement between the two studies suggests that the choice of 1.45 mm thick skin layer comprising the epidermis and the dermis for breast dosimetry is appropriate. While some benign and malignant conditions could cause skin thickening, in this study cohort the location-averaged mean breast skin thickness distributions did not differ significantly with pathology. The study also underscored the importance of considering breast curvature in estimating breast skin thickness.« less
  • Purpose : A method is presented for generating simulated low-dose cone-beam CT (CBCT) preview images from which patient- and task-specific minimum-dose protocols can be confidently selected prospectively in clinical scenarios involving repeat scans. Methods : In clinical scenarios involving a series of CBCT images, the low-dose preview (LDP) method operates upon the first scan to create a projection dataset that accurately simulates the effects of dose reduction in subsequent scans by injecting noise of proper magnitude and correlation, including both quantum and electronic readout noise as important components of image noise in flat-panel detector CBCT. Experiments were conducted to validatemore » the LDP method in both a head phantom and a cadaveric torso by performing CBCT acquisitions spanning a wide dose range (head: 0.8–13.2 mGy, body: 0.8–12.4 mGy) with a prototype mobile C-arm system. After injecting correlated noise to simulate dose reduction, the projections were reconstructed using both conventional filtered backprojection (FBP) and an iterative, model-based image reconstruction method (MBIR). The LDP images were then compared to real CBCT images in terms of noise magnitude, noise-power spectrum (NPS), spatial resolution, contrast, and artifacts. Results : For both FBP and MBIR, the LDP images exhibited accurate levels of spatial resolution and contrast that were unaffected by the correlated noise injection, as expected. Furthermore, the LDP image noise magnitude and NPS were in strong agreement with real CBCT images acquired at the corresponding, reduced dose level across the entire dose range considered. The noise magnitude agreed within 7% for both the head phantom and cadaveric torso, and the NPS showed a similar level of agreement up to the Nyquist frequency. Therefore, the LDP images were highly representative of real image quality across a broad range of dose and reconstruction methods. On the other hand, naïve injection ofuncorrelated noise resulted in strong underestimation of the true noise, which would lead to overly optimistic predictions of dose reduction. Conclusions : Correlated noise injection is essential to accurate simulation of CBCT image quality at reduced dose. With the proposed LDP method, the user can prospectively select patient-specific, minimum-dose protocols (viz., acquisition technique and reconstruction method) suitable to a particular imaging task and to the user's own observer preferences for CBCT scans following the first acquisition. The method could provide dose reduction in common clinical scenarios involving multiple CBCT scans, such as image-guided surgery and radiotherapy.« less