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Title: SU-D-207A-05: Investigating Sparse-Sampled MRI for Motion Management in Thoracic Radiotherapy

Abstract

Purpose: Sparse sampling and reconstruction-based MRI techniques represent an attractive strategy to achieve sufficiently high image acquisition speed while maintaining image quality for the task of radiotherapy guidance. In this study, we examine rapid dynamic MRI using a sparse sampling sequence k-t BLAST in capturing motion-induced, cycle-to-cycle variations in tumor position. We investigate the utility of long-term MRI-based motion monitoring as a means of better characterizing respiration-induced tumor motion compared to a single-cycle 4DCT. Methods: An MRI-compatible, programmable, deformable lung motion phantom with eleven 1.5 ml water marker tubes was placed inside a 3.0 T whole-body MR scanner (Philips Ingenia). The phantom was programmed with 10 lung tumor motion traces previously recorded using the Synchrony system. 2D+t image sequences of a coronal slice were acquired using a balanced-SSFP sequence combined with k-t BLAST (accn=3, resolution=0.66×0.66×5 mm3; acquisition time = 110 ms/slice). kV fluoroscopic (ground truth) and 4DCT imaging was performed with the same phantom setup and motion trajectories. Marker positions in all three modalities were segmented and tracked using an opensource deformable image registration package, NiftyReg. Results: Marker trajectories obtained from rapid MRI exhibited <1 mm error compared to kv Fluoro trajectories in the presence of complex motion including baselinemore » shifts and changes in respiratory amplitude, indicating the ability of MRI to monitor motion with adequate geometric fidelity for the purpose of radiotherapy guidance. In contrast, the trajectory derived from 4DCT exhibited significant errors up to 6 mm due to cycle-to-cycle variations and baseline shifts. Consequently, 4DCT was found to underestimate the range of marker motion by as much as 50%. Conclusion: Dynamic MRI is a promising tool for radiotherapy motion management as it permits for longterm, dose-free, soft-tissue-based monitoring of motion, yielding richer and more accurate information about tumor position and motion range compared to the current state-of-the-art, 4DCT. This work was partially supported through research funding from National Institutes of Health (R01CA169102).« less

Authors:
;  [1];  [2]
  1. University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)
  2. University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22624396
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; ANIMAL TISSUES; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; IMAGES; LUNGS; NEOPLASMS; NMR IMAGING; PHANTOMS; RADIOTHERAPY; SAMPLING

Citation Formats

Sabouri, P, Sawant, A, and Arai, T. SU-D-207A-05: Investigating Sparse-Sampled MRI for Motion Management in Thoracic Radiotherapy. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4955652.
Sabouri, P, Sawant, A, & Arai, T. SU-D-207A-05: Investigating Sparse-Sampled MRI for Motion Management in Thoracic Radiotherapy. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4955652.
Sabouri, P, Sawant, A, and Arai, T. 2016. "SU-D-207A-05: Investigating Sparse-Sampled MRI for Motion Management in Thoracic Radiotherapy". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4955652.
@article{osti_22624396,
title = {SU-D-207A-05: Investigating Sparse-Sampled MRI for Motion Management in Thoracic Radiotherapy},
author = {Sabouri, P and Sawant, A and Arai, T},
abstractNote = {Purpose: Sparse sampling and reconstruction-based MRI techniques represent an attractive strategy to achieve sufficiently high image acquisition speed while maintaining image quality for the task of radiotherapy guidance. In this study, we examine rapid dynamic MRI using a sparse sampling sequence k-t BLAST in capturing motion-induced, cycle-to-cycle variations in tumor position. We investigate the utility of long-term MRI-based motion monitoring as a means of better characterizing respiration-induced tumor motion compared to a single-cycle 4DCT. Methods: An MRI-compatible, programmable, deformable lung motion phantom with eleven 1.5 ml water marker tubes was placed inside a 3.0 T whole-body MR scanner (Philips Ingenia). The phantom was programmed with 10 lung tumor motion traces previously recorded using the Synchrony system. 2D+t image sequences of a coronal slice were acquired using a balanced-SSFP sequence combined with k-t BLAST (accn=3, resolution=0.66×0.66×5 mm3; acquisition time = 110 ms/slice). kV fluoroscopic (ground truth) and 4DCT imaging was performed with the same phantom setup and motion trajectories. Marker positions in all three modalities were segmented and tracked using an opensource deformable image registration package, NiftyReg. Results: Marker trajectories obtained from rapid MRI exhibited <1 mm error compared to kv Fluoro trajectories in the presence of complex motion including baseline shifts and changes in respiratory amplitude, indicating the ability of MRI to monitor motion with adequate geometric fidelity for the purpose of radiotherapy guidance. In contrast, the trajectory derived from 4DCT exhibited significant errors up to 6 mm due to cycle-to-cycle variations and baseline shifts. Consequently, 4DCT was found to underestimate the range of marker motion by as much as 50%. Conclusion: Dynamic MRI is a promising tool for radiotherapy motion management as it permits for longterm, dose-free, soft-tissue-based monitoring of motion, yielding richer and more accurate information about tumor position and motion range compared to the current state-of-the-art, 4DCT. This work was partially supported through research funding from National Institutes of Health (R01CA169102).},
doi = {10.1118/1.4955652},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Purpose: To assess the respiratory motion of different thoracic nodal locations and its dependence on the presence of enlarged nodes; to assess the respiratory motion of different parenchymal tumor locations; and to determine the appropriate margins to cover the respiratory motion of targets at these locations. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the four-dimensional computed tomography scans of 20 patients with thoracic tumors treated at our institution. The motion of four central thoracic locations (aortic arch, carina, and bilateral hila), parenchymal tumor locations (upper vs. lower, and anterior vs. middle vs. posterior thorax), and bilateral diaphragmatic domes was measured. Results: Formore » the central thoracic locations, the largest motion was in the superoinferior (SI) dimension (>5 mm for bilateral hila and carina, but <4 mm for aortic arch). No significant difference was found in the motion of these locations in the absence or presence of enlarged nodes. For parenchymal tumors, upper tumors exhibited smaller SI motion than did lower tumors (3.7 vs. 10.4 mm, p = 0.029). Similarly, anterior tumors exhibited smaller motion than did posterior tumors in both the SI (4.0 vs. 8.0 mm, p = 0.013) and lateral (2.8 vs. 4.6 mm, p = 0.045) directions. The margins that would be needed to encompass the respiratory motion of each of the evaluated locations in 95% of patients were tabulated and range from 3.4 to 37.2 mm, depending on the location and direction. Conclusions: The results of our study have provided data for appropriate site-specific internal target volume expansion that could be useful in the absence of four-dimensional computed tomography-based treatment planning. However, generalizing the results from a small patient population requires discretion.« less
  • Purpose: Sparse-view computed tomography (CT) reconstruction is an effective strategy to reduce the radiation dose delivered to patients. Due to its insufficiency of measurements, traditional non-local means (NLM) based reconstruction methods often lead to over-smoothness in image edges. To address this problem, an adaptive NLM reconstruction method based on rotational invariance (RIANLM) is proposed. Methods: The method consists of four steps: 1) Initializing parameters; 2) Algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) reconstruction using raw projection data; 3) Positivity constraint of the image reconstructed by ART; 4) Update reconstructed image by using RIANLM filtering. In RIANLM, a novel similarity metric that is rotationalmore » invariance is proposed and used to calculate the distance between two patches. In this way, any patch with similar structure but different orientation to the reference patch would win a relatively large weight to avoid over-smoothed image. Moreover, the parameter h in RIANLM which controls the decay of the weights is adaptive to avoid over-smoothness, while it in NLM is not adaptive during the whole reconstruction process. The proposed method is named as ART-RIANLM and validated on Shepp-Logan phantom and clinical projection data. Results: In our experiments, the searching neighborhood size is set to 15 by 15 and the similarity window is set to 3 by 3. For the simulated case with a resolution of 256 by 256 Shepp-Logan phantom, the ART-RIANLM produces higher SNR (35.38dB<24.00dB) and lower MAE (0.0006<0.0023) reconstructed image than ART-NLM. The visual inspection demonstrated that the proposed method could suppress artifacts or noises more effectively and preserve image edges better. Similar results were found for clinical data case. Conclusion: A novel ART-RIANLM method for sparse-view CT reconstruction is presented with superior image. Compared to the conventional ART-NLM method, the SNR and MAE from ART-RIANLM increases 47% and decreases 74%, respectively.« less
  • Purpose: To propose an alternative radiation therapy (RT) planning and delivery scheme with optimal angular beam sampling and intrabeam modulation for improved dose distribution while maintaining high delivery efficiency. Methods: In the proposed approach, coined as dense angularly sampled and sparse intensity modulated RT (DASSIM-RT), a large number of beam angles are used to increase the angular sampling, leading to potentially more conformal dose distributions as compared to conventional IMRT. At the same time, intensity modulation of the incident beams is simplified to eliminate the dispensable segments, compensating the increase in delivery time caused by the increased number of beamsmore » and facilitating the plan delivery. In a sense, the proposed approach shifts and transforms, in an optimal fashion, some of the beam segments in conventional IMRT to the added beams. For newly available digital accelerators, the DASSIM-RT delivery can be made very efficient by concatenating the beams so that they can be delivered sequentially without operator's intervention. Different from VMAT, the level of intensity modulation in DASSIS-RT is field specific and optimized to meet the need of each beam direction. Three clinical cases (a head and neck (HN) case, a pancreas case, and a lung case) are used to evaluate the proposed RT scheme. DASSIM-RT, VMAT, and conventional IMRT plans are compared quantitatively in terms of the conformality index (CI) and delivery efficiency. Results: Plan quality improves generally with the number and intensity modulation of the incident beams. For a fixed number of beams or fixed level of intensity modulation, the improvement saturates after the intensity modulation or number of beams reaches to a certain level. An interplay between the two variables is observed and the saturation point depends on the values of both variables. For all the cases studied here, the CI of DASSIM-RT with 15 beams and 5 intensity levels (0.90, 0.79, and 0.84 for the HN, pancreas, and lung cases, respectively) is similar with that of conventional IMRT with seven beams and ten intensity levels (0.88, 0.79, and 0.83) and is higher than that of single-arc VMAT (0.75, 0.75, and 0.82). It is also found that the DASSIM-RT plans generally have better sparing of organs-at-risk than IMRT plans. It is estimated that the dose delivery time of DASSIM-RT with 15 beams and 5 intensity levels is about 4.5, 4.4, and 4.2 min for the HN, pancreas, and lung case, respectively, similar to that of IMRT plans with 7 beams and 10 intensity levels.Conclusion: DASSIS-RT bridges the gap between IMRT and VMAT and allows optimal sampling of angular space and intrabeam modulation, thus it provides improved conformity in dose distributions while maintaining high delivery efficiency.« less