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Title: SU-D-BRA-04: Computerized Framework for Marker-Less Localization of Anatomical Feature Points in Range Images Based On Differential Geometry Features for Image-Guided Radiation Therapy

Abstract

Purpose: To propose a computerized framework for localization of anatomical feature points on the patient surface in infrared-ray based range images by using differential geometry (curvature) features. Methods: The general concept was to reconstruct the patient surface by using a mathematical modeling technique for the computation of differential geometry features that characterize the local shapes of the patient surfaces. A region of interest (ROI) was firstly extracted based on a template matching technique applied on amplitude (grayscale) images. The extracted ROI was preprocessed for reducing temporal and spatial noises by using Kalman and bilateral filters, respectively. Next, a smooth patient surface was reconstructed by using a non-uniform rational basis spline (NURBS) model. Finally, differential geometry features, i.e. the shape index and curvedness features were computed for localizing the anatomical feature points. The proposed framework was trained for optimizing shape index and curvedness thresholds and tested on range images of an anthropomorphic head phantom. The range images were acquired by an infrared ray-based time-of-flight (TOF) camera. The localization accuracy was evaluated by measuring the mean of minimum Euclidean distances (MMED) between reference (ground truth) points and the feature points localized by the proposed framework. The evaluation was performed for points localizedmore » on convex regions (e.g. apex of nose) and concave regions (e.g. nasofacial sulcus). Results: The proposed framework has localized anatomical feature points on convex and concave anatomical landmarks with MMEDs of 1.91±0.50 mm and 3.70±0.92 mm, respectively. A statistically significant difference was obtained between the feature points on the convex and concave regions (P<0.001). Conclusion: Our study has shown the feasibility of differential geometry features for localization of anatomical feature points on the patient surface in range images. The proposed framework might be useful for tasks involving feature-based image registration in range-image guided radiation therapy.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1];  [2]; ;  [3];  [4]
  1. Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Fukuoka (Japan)
  2. Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka (Japan)
  3. Kyushu University Hospital, Fukuoka, Fukuoka (Japan)
  4. Saga Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Tosu, Tosu, Saga (Japan)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22624385
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; ACCURACY; AMPLITUDES; CALCULATION METHODS; CAMERAS; EUCLIDEAN SPACE; EVALUATION; IMAGES; OPTIMIZATION; PATIENTS; PHANTOMS; RADIOTHERAPY; TIME-OF-FLIGHT METHOD

Citation Formats

Soufi, M, Arimura, H, Toyofuku, F, Nakamura, K, Hirose, T, Umezu, Y, and Shioyama, Y. SU-D-BRA-04: Computerized Framework for Marker-Less Localization of Anatomical Feature Points in Range Images Based On Differential Geometry Features for Image-Guided Radiation Therapy. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4955637.
Soufi, M, Arimura, H, Toyofuku, F, Nakamura, K, Hirose, T, Umezu, Y, & Shioyama, Y. SU-D-BRA-04: Computerized Framework for Marker-Less Localization of Anatomical Feature Points in Range Images Based On Differential Geometry Features for Image-Guided Radiation Therapy. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4955637.
Soufi, M, Arimura, H, Toyofuku, F, Nakamura, K, Hirose, T, Umezu, Y, and Shioyama, Y. Wed . "SU-D-BRA-04: Computerized Framework for Marker-Less Localization of Anatomical Feature Points in Range Images Based On Differential Geometry Features for Image-Guided Radiation Therapy". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4955637.
@article{osti_22624385,
title = {SU-D-BRA-04: Computerized Framework for Marker-Less Localization of Anatomical Feature Points in Range Images Based On Differential Geometry Features for Image-Guided Radiation Therapy},
author = {Soufi, M and Arimura, H and Toyofuku, F and Nakamura, K and Hirose, T and Umezu, Y and Shioyama, Y},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To propose a computerized framework for localization of anatomical feature points on the patient surface in infrared-ray based range images by using differential geometry (curvature) features. Methods: The general concept was to reconstruct the patient surface by using a mathematical modeling technique for the computation of differential geometry features that characterize the local shapes of the patient surfaces. A region of interest (ROI) was firstly extracted based on a template matching technique applied on amplitude (grayscale) images. The extracted ROI was preprocessed for reducing temporal and spatial noises by using Kalman and bilateral filters, respectively. Next, a smooth patient surface was reconstructed by using a non-uniform rational basis spline (NURBS) model. Finally, differential geometry features, i.e. the shape index and curvedness features were computed for localizing the anatomical feature points. The proposed framework was trained for optimizing shape index and curvedness thresholds and tested on range images of an anthropomorphic head phantom. The range images were acquired by an infrared ray-based time-of-flight (TOF) camera. The localization accuracy was evaluated by measuring the mean of minimum Euclidean distances (MMED) between reference (ground truth) points and the feature points localized by the proposed framework. The evaluation was performed for points localized on convex regions (e.g. apex of nose) and concave regions (e.g. nasofacial sulcus). Results: The proposed framework has localized anatomical feature points on convex and concave anatomical landmarks with MMEDs of 1.91±0.50 mm and 3.70±0.92 mm, respectively. A statistically significant difference was obtained between the feature points on the convex and concave regions (P<0.001). Conclusion: Our study has shown the feasibility of differential geometry features for localization of anatomical feature points on the patient surface in range images. The proposed framework might be useful for tasks involving feature-based image registration in range-image guided radiation therapy.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4955637},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
  • Purpose: To detect target position on kV X-ray fluoroscopic images using a feature-based tracking algorithm, Accelerated-KAZE (AKAZE), for markerless real-time tumor tracking (RTTT). Methods: Twelve lung cancer patients treated with RTTT on the Vero4DRT (Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Japan, and Brainlab AG, Feldkirchen, Germany) were enrolled in this study. Respiratory tumor movement was greater than 10 mm. Three to five fiducial markers were implanted around the lung tumor transbronchially for each patient. Before beam delivery, external infrared (IR) markers and the fiducial markers were monitored for 20 to 40 s with the IR camera every 16.7 ms and with an orthogonalmore » kV x-ray imaging subsystem every 80 or 160 ms, respectively. Target positions derived from the fiducial markers were determined on the orthogonal kV x-ray images, which were used as the ground truth in this study. Meanwhile, tracking positions were identified by AKAZE. Among a lot of feature points, AKAZE found high-quality feature points through sequential cross-check and distance-check between two consecutive images. Then, these 2D positional data were converted to the 3D positional data by a transformation matrix with a predefined calibration parameter. Root mean square error (RMSE) was calculated to evaluate the difference between 3D tracking and target positions. A total of 393 frames was analyzed. The experiment was conducted on a personal computer with 16 GB RAM, Intel Core i7-2600, 3.4 GHz processor. Results: Reproducibility of the target position during the same respiratory phase was 0.6 +/− 0.6 mm (range, 0.1–3.3 mm). Mean +/− SD of the RMSEs was 0.3 +/− 0.2 mm (range, 0.0–1.0 mm). Median computation time per frame was 179 msec (range, 154–247 msec). Conclusion: AKAZE successfully and quickly detected the target position on kV X-ray fluoroscopic images. Initial results indicate that the differences between 3D tracking and target position would be clinically acceptable.« less
  • Purpose: To review IGRT credentialing experience and unexpected technical issues encountered in connection with advanced radiotherapy technologies as implemented in RTOG clinical trials. To update IGRT credentialing procedures with the aim of improving the quality of the process, and to increase the proportion of IGRT credentialing compliance. To develop a living disease site-specific IGRT encyclopedia. Methods: Numerous technical issues were encountered during the IGRT credentialing process. The criteria used for credentialing review were based on: image quality; anatomy included in fused data sets and shift results. Credentialing requirements have been updated according to the AAPM task group reports for IGRTmore » to ensure that all required technical items are included in the quality review process. Implementation instructions have been updated and expanded for recent protocols. Results: Technical issues observed during the credentialing review process include, but are not limited to: poor quality images; inadequate image acquisition region; poor data quality; shifts larger than acceptable; no soft tissue surrogate. The updated IGRT credentialing process will address these issues and will also include the technical items required from AAPM: TG 104; TG 142 and TG 179 reports. An instruction manual has been developed describing a remote credentialing method for reviewers. Submission requirements are updated, including images/documents as well as facility questionnaire. The review report now includes summary of the review process and the parameters that reviewers check. We have reached consensus on the minimum IGRT technical requirement for a number of disease sites. RTOG 1311(NRG-BR002A Phase 1 Study of Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) for the Treatment of Multiple Metastases) is an example, here; the protocol specified the minimum requirement for each anatomical sites (with/without fiducials). Conclusion: Technical issues are identified and reported. IGRT guidelines are updated, with the corresponding credentialing requirements. An IGRT encyclopedia describing site-specific implementation issues is currently in development.« less
  • Purpose: To compare depth-dose and surface-dose measurements without and with the magnetic field in a 0.3T MR image-guided Co-60 treatment unit using MOSFET dosimeters. Methods: MOSFET dosimeters (Best Medical Canada, model TN-502RDH-10) were placed in a solid water phantom at 5cm depth with 8cm backscatter (with the MOSFET wires in different orientations to the couch long axis) and also on the surface of an 8cm solid water phantom. The phantoms were placed in an MR image-guided Co-60 treatment machine at an SAD of 105cm to the MOSFETs. Dose measurements were performed between 50 and 200cGy at 5cm depth in amore » 10.5cm × 10.5cm radiation field without the magnetic field (during a machine maintenance period) and with the nominal magnetic field of 0.3T. The dose linearity was measured at 5cm depth with an orthogonal field and the angular dose dependence was measured on the surface with an orthogonal field and oblique fields at +60 degrees and −60 degrees. Results: The measured MOSFET readings at 5cm depth were linear with dose with slopes of (2.97 +/− 0.01) mV/cGy and (3.01 +/− 0.02) mV/cGy without and with the magnetic field, respectively. No statistically significant difference was found. The surface dose measurements, however, were lower by 6.4% for the AP field (2.3 σ) with magnetic field, 4.9% for the −60 degree field (1.4 σ), and 0.4% different for the +60 degree field (0.2 σ). Conclusion: There is no statistically significant difference in the dose at depth without and with the magnetic field and different orientations of the MOSFET wires. There is a statistically significant difference for the surface dose due to the influence of the magnetic field on secondary electrons from head-scatter and the build-up region in certain field orientations. Clinical surface-dose dosimetry in a magnetic field should apply asymmetric angle-dependent corrections.« less
  • Purpose: To implement the Gradient Echo Plural Contrast Imaging(GEPCI) technique in MRI-simulation for radiation therapy and assess the feasibility of using GEPCI images with advanced inhomogeneity correction in MRI-guided radiotherapy for brain treatment. Methods: An optimized multigradient-echo GRE sequence (TR=50ms;TE1=4ms;delta-TE=4ms;flip angle=300,11 Echoes) was developed to generate both structural (T1w and T2*w) and functional MRIs (field and susceptibility maps) from a single acquisition. One healthy subject (Subject1) and one post-surgical brain cancer patient (Subject2) were scanned on a Philips Ingenia 1.5T MRI used for radiation therapy simulation. Another healthy subject (Subject3) was scanned on a 0.35T MRI-guided radiotherapy (MR-IGRT) system (ViewRay).more » A voxel spread function (VSF) was used to correct the B0 inhomogeneities caused by surgical cavities and edema for Subject2. GEPCI images and standard radiotherapy planning MRIs for this patient were compared focusing the delineation of radiotherapy target region. Results: GEPCI brain images were successfully derived from all three subjects with scan times of <7 minutes. The images derived for Subjects1&2 demonstrated that GEPCI can be applied and combined into radiotherapy MRI simulation. Despite low field, T1-weighted and R2* images were successfully reconstructed for Subject3 and were satisfactory for contour and target delineation. The R2* distribution of grey matter (center=12,FWHM=4.5) and white matter (center=14.6, FWHM=2) demonstrated the feasibility for tissue segmentation and quantification. The voxel spread function(VSF) corrected surgical site related inhomogeneities for Subject2. R2* and quantitative susceptibility map(QSM) images for Subject2 can be used to quantitatively assess the brain structure response to radiation over the treatment course. Conclusion: We implemented the GEPCI technique in MRI-simulation and in MR-IGRT system for radiation therapy. The images demonstrated that it is feasible to adopt this technique in radiotherapy for structural delineation. The preliminary data also enable the opportunity for quantitative assessment of radiation response of the target region and normal tissue.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate the effect of inter- and intra-fractional tumor motion on the error in four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) maximal intensity projection (MIP)–based lung tumor internal target volumes (ITV), using deformable image registration of real-time 2D-sagital cine-mode MRI acquired during lung SBRT treatments. Methods: Five lung tumor patients underwent free breathing SBRT treatment on the ViewRay, with dose prescribed to PTV (4DCT MIP-based ITV+3–6mm margin). Sagittal slice cine-MR images (3.5×3.5mm pixels) were acquired through the center of the tumor at 4 frames per second throughout the treatments (3–4 fractions of 21–32 minutes duration). Tumor GTVs were contoured on the firstmore » frame of the cine and tracked throughout the treatment using off-line optical-flow based deformable registration implemented on a GPU cluster. Pseudo-4DCT MIP-based ITVs were generated from MIPs of the deformed GTV contours limited to short segments of image data. All possible pseudo-4DCT MIP-based ITV volumes were generated with 1s resolution and compared to the ITV volume of the entire treatment course. Varying pseudo-4DCT durations from 10-50s were analyzed. Results: Tumors were covered in their entirety by PTV in the patients analysed here. However, pseudo-4DCT based ITV volumes were observed that were as small as 29% of the entire treatment-ITV, depending on breathing irregularity and the duration of pseudo-4DCT. With an increase in duration of pseudo-4DCT from 10–50s the minimum volume acquired from 95% of all pseudo-4DCTs increased from 62%–81% of the treatment ITV. Conclusion: A 4DCT MIP-based ITV offers a ‘snap-shot’ of breathing motion for the brief period of time the tumor is imaged on a specific day. Real time MRI over prolonged periods of time and over multiple treatment fractions shows that the accuracy of this snap-shot varies according to inter- and intra-fractional tumor motion. Further work is required to investigate the dosimetric effect of these results.« less