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Title: SU-D-BRC-01: An Automatic Beam Model Commissioning Method for Monte Carlo Simulations in Pencil-Beam Scanning Proton Therapy

Abstract

Purpose: Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is typically regarded as the most accurate dose calculation method for proton therapy. Yet for real clinical cases, the overall accuracy also depends on that of the MC beam model. Commissioning a beam model to faithfully represent a real beam requires finely tuning a set of model parameters, which could be tedious given the large number of pencil beams to commmission. This abstract reports an automatic beam-model commissioning method for pencil-beam scanning proton therapy via an optimization approach. Methods: We modeled a real pencil beam with energy and spatial spread following Gaussian distributions. Mean energy, and energy and spatial spread are model parameters. To commission against a real beam, we first performed MC simulations to calculate dose distributions of a set of ideal (monoenergetic, zero-size) pencil beams. Dose distribution for a real pencil beam is hence linear superposition of doses for those ideal pencil beams with weights in the Gaussian form. We formulated the commissioning task as an optimization problem, such that the calculated central axis depth dose and lateral profiles at several depths match corresponding measurements. An iterative algorithm combining conjugate gradient method and parameter fitting was employed to solve the optimization problem. Wemore » validated our method in simulation studies. Results: We calculated dose distributions for three real pencil beams with nominal energies 83, 147 and 199 MeV using realistic beam parameters. These data were regarded as measurements and used for commission. After commissioning, average difference in energy and beam spread between determined values and ground truth were 4.6% and 0.2%. With the commissioned model, we recomputed dose. Mean dose differences from measurements were 0.64%, 0.20% and 0.25%. Conclusion: The developed automatic MC beam-model commissioning method for pencil-beam scanning proton therapy can determine beam model parameters with satisfactory accuracy.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. UT Southwestern Medical Ctr, Dallas, TX (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22624372
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; ACCURACY; ALGORITHMS; COMMISSIONING; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; DEPTH DOSE DISTRIBUTIONS; GROUND TRUTH MEASUREMENTS; ITERATIVE METHODS; MONTE CARLO METHOD; OPTIMIZATION; PROTON BEAMS; RADIOTHERAPY

Citation Formats

Qin, N, Shen, C, Tian, Z, Jiang, S, and Jia, X. SU-D-BRC-01: An Automatic Beam Model Commissioning Method for Monte Carlo Simulations in Pencil-Beam Scanning Proton Therapy. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4955620.
Qin, N, Shen, C, Tian, Z, Jiang, S, & Jia, X. SU-D-BRC-01: An Automatic Beam Model Commissioning Method for Monte Carlo Simulations in Pencil-Beam Scanning Proton Therapy. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4955620.
Qin, N, Shen, C, Tian, Z, Jiang, S, and Jia, X. 2016. "SU-D-BRC-01: An Automatic Beam Model Commissioning Method for Monte Carlo Simulations in Pencil-Beam Scanning Proton Therapy". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4955620.
@article{osti_22624372,
title = {SU-D-BRC-01: An Automatic Beam Model Commissioning Method for Monte Carlo Simulations in Pencil-Beam Scanning Proton Therapy},
author = {Qin, N and Shen, C and Tian, Z and Jiang, S and Jia, X},
abstractNote = {Purpose: Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is typically regarded as the most accurate dose calculation method for proton therapy. Yet for real clinical cases, the overall accuracy also depends on that of the MC beam model. Commissioning a beam model to faithfully represent a real beam requires finely tuning a set of model parameters, which could be tedious given the large number of pencil beams to commmission. This abstract reports an automatic beam-model commissioning method for pencil-beam scanning proton therapy via an optimization approach. Methods: We modeled a real pencil beam with energy and spatial spread following Gaussian distributions. Mean energy, and energy and spatial spread are model parameters. To commission against a real beam, we first performed MC simulations to calculate dose distributions of a set of ideal (monoenergetic, zero-size) pencil beams. Dose distribution for a real pencil beam is hence linear superposition of doses for those ideal pencil beams with weights in the Gaussian form. We formulated the commissioning task as an optimization problem, such that the calculated central axis depth dose and lateral profiles at several depths match corresponding measurements. An iterative algorithm combining conjugate gradient method and parameter fitting was employed to solve the optimization problem. We validated our method in simulation studies. Results: We calculated dose distributions for three real pencil beams with nominal energies 83, 147 and 199 MeV using realistic beam parameters. These data were regarded as measurements and used for commission. After commissioning, average difference in energy and beam spread between determined values and ground truth were 4.6% and 0.2%. With the commissioned model, we recomputed dose. Mean dose differences from measurements were 0.64%, 0.20% and 0.25%. Conclusion: The developed automatic MC beam-model commissioning method for pencil-beam scanning proton therapy can determine beam model parameters with satisfactory accuracy.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4955620},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Purpose: To quantitatively evaluate dosimetric consequence of spot size variations and validate beam-matching criteria for commissioning a pencil beam model for multiple treatment rooms. Methods: A planning study was first conducted by simulating spot size variations to systematically evaluate dosimetric impact of spot size variations in selected cases, which was used to establish the in-air spot size tolerance for beam matching specifications. A beam model in treatment planning system was created using in-air spot profiles acquired in one treatment room. These spot profiles were also acquired from another treatment room for assessing the actual spot size variations between the twomore » treatment rooms. We created twenty five test plans with targets of different sizes at different depths, and performed dose measurement along the entrance, proximal and distal target regions. The absolute doses at those locations were measured using ionization chambers at both treatment rooms, and were compared against the calculated doses by the beam model. Fifteen additional patient plans were also measured and included in our validation. Results: The beam model is relatively insensitive to spot size variations. With an average of less than 15% measured in-air spot size variations between two treatment rooms, the average dose difference was −0.15% with a standard deviation of 0.40% for 55 measurement points within target region; but the differences increased to 1.4%±1.1% in the entrance regions, which are more affected by in-air spot size variations. Overall, our single-room based beam model in the treatment planning system agreed with measurements in both rooms < 0.5% within the target region. For fifteen patient cases, the agreement was within 1%. Conclusion: We have demonstrated that dosimetrically equivalent machines can be established when in-air spot size variations are within 15% between the two treatment rooms.« less
  • Purpose: Monte Carlo simulation plays an important role for proton Pencil Beam Scanning (PBS) technique. However, MC simulation demands high computing power and is limited to few large proton centers that can afford a computer cluster. We study the feasibility of utilizing cloud computing in the MC simulation of PBS beams. Methods: A GATE/GEANT4 based MC simulation software was installed on a commercial cloud computing virtual machine (Linux 64-bits, Amazon EC2). Single spot Integral Depth Dose (IDD) curves and in-air transverse profiles were used to tune the source parameters to simulate an IBA machine. With the use of StarCluster softwaremore » developed at MIT, a Linux cluster with 2–100 nodes can be conveniently launched in the cloud. A proton PBS plan was then exported to the cloud where the MC simulation was run. Results: The simulated PBS plan has a field size of 10×10cm{sup 2}, 20cm range, 10cm modulation, and contains over 10,000 beam spots. EC2 instance type m1.medium was selected considering the CPU/memory requirement and 40 instances were used to form a Linux cluster. To minimize cost, master node was created with on-demand instance and worker nodes were created with spot-instance. The hourly cost for the 40-node cluster was $0.63 and the projected cost for a 100-node cluster was $1.41. Ten million events were simulated to plot PDD and profile, with each job containing 500k events. The simulation completed within 1 hour and an overall statistical uncertainty of < 2% was achieved. Good agreement between MC simulation and measurement was observed. Conclusion: Cloud computing is a cost-effective and easy to maintain platform to run proton PBS MC simulation. When proton MC packages such as GATE and TOPAS are combined with cloud computing, it will greatly facilitate the pursuing of PBS MC studies, especially for newly established proton centers or individual researchers.« less
  • Purpose: Eclipse proton Monte Carlo AcurosPT 13.7 was commissioned and experimentally validated for an IBA dedicated PBS nozzle in water. Topas 1.3 was used to isolate the cause of differences in output and penumbra between simulation and experiment. Methods: The spot profiles were measured in air at five locations using Lynx. PTW-34070 Bragg peak chamber (Freiburg, Germany) was used to collect the relative integral Bragg peak for 15 proton energies from 100 MeV to 225 MeV. The phase space parameters (σx, σθ, ρxθ) number of protons per MU, energy spread and calculated mean energy provided by AcurosPT were identically implementedmore » into Topas. The absolute dose, profiles and field size factors measured using ionization chamber arrays were compared with both AcurosPT and Topas. Results: The beam spot size, σx, and the angular spread, σθ, in air were both energy-dependent: in particular, the spot size in air at isocentre ranged from 2.8 to 5.3 mm, and the angular spread ranged from 2.7 mrad to 6 mrad. The number of protons per MU increased from ∼9E7 at 100 MeV to ∼1.5E8 at 225 MeV. Both AcurosPT and TOPAS agree with experiment within 2 mm penumbra difference or 3% dose difference for scenarios including central axis depth dose and profiles at two depths in multi-spot square fields, from 40 to 200 mm, for all the investigated single-energy and multi-energy beams, indicating clinically acceptable source model and radiation transport algorithm in water. Conclusion: By comparing measured data and TOPAS simulation using the same source model, the AcurosPT 13.7 was validated in water within 2 mm penumbra difference or 3% dose difference. Benchmarks versus an independent Monte Carlo code are recommended to study the agreement in output, filed size factors and penumbra differences. This project is partially supported by the Varian grant under the master agreement between University of Pennsylvania and Varian.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate the Monte Carlo simulated beam data with the measured commissioning data for the Mevion S250 proton therapy system. Method: The Mevion S250 proton therapy system utilizes a passive double scattering technique with a unique gantry mounted superconducting accelerator and offers effective proton therapy in a compact design concept. The field shaping system (FSS) includes first scattering foil, range modulator wheel (RMW), second scattering foil and post absorber and offers two field sizes and a total of 24 treatment options from proton range of 5 cm to 32 cm. The treatment nozzle was modeled in detail using TOPASmore » (TOolkit for PArticle Simulation) Monte Carlo code. The timing feathers of the moving modulator wheels were also implemented to generate the Spread Out Bragg Peak (SOBP). The simulation results including pristine Bragg Peak, SOBP and dose profiles were compared with the data measured during beam commissioning. Results: The comparison between the measured data and the simulation data show excellent agreement. For pristine proton Bragg Peaks, the simulated proton range (depth of distal 90%) values agreed well with the measured range values within 1 mm accuracy. The differences of the distal falloffs (depth from distal 80% to 20%) were also found to be less than 1 mm between the simulations and measurements. For the SOBP, the widths of modulation (depth of proximal 95% to distal 90%) were also found to agree with the measurement within 1 mm. The flatness of the simulated and measured lateral profiles was found to be 0.6 % and 1.1 %, respectively. Conclusion: The agreement between simulations and measurements demonstrate that TOPAS could be used as a viable platform to proton therapy applications. The matched simulation results offer a great tool and open opportunity for variety of applications.« less
  • Purpose: To build the model of a spot scanning proton beam for the dose calculation of a synchrotron proton therapy accelerator, which is capable of accelerating protons from 50 up to 221 MeV. Methods: The spot scanning beam nozzle is modeled using TOPAS code, a simulation tool based on Geant4.9.6. The model contained a beam pipe vacuum window, a beam profile monitor, a drift chamber, two plane-parallel ionization chambers, and a spot-position monitor consisted of a multiwire ionization chamber. A water phantom is located with its upstream surface at the isocenter plane. The initial proton beam energy and anglar deflectionmore » are modeled using a Gaussian distribution with FWHM (Full Widths at Half Maximum) deponding on its beam energy. The phase space file (PSF) on a virtual surface located at the center between the two magnets is recorded. PSF is used to analyze the pencil beam features and offset the pencil beam position. The source model parameters are verificated by fitting the simulated Result to the measurement. Results: The simulated percentage depth dose (PDD) and lateral profiles of scanning pencil beams of various incident proton energies are verificated to the measurement. Generally the distance to agreement (DTA) of Bragg peaks is less than 0.2cm. The FWHM of Gaussian anglar distribution was adjusted to fit the lateral profile difference between the simulation and the measurement to less than 2∼3cm. Conclusion: A Monte Carlo model of a spot scanning proton beam was bullt based on a synchrotron proton therapy accelerator. This scanning pencil beam model will be as a block to build the broad proton beam as a proton TPS dose verification tool.« less