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Title: Effect of solid-state characteristics on the critical parameters of the vapor–liquid phase transition

Abstract

Database for the critical point parameters of almost all metals (including transition metals) and semiconductors is used to derive a number of empirical expressions to relate these parameters to the heat of evaporation, the normal density, and the isothermal bulk modulus of these substances in a solid state under normal conditions. The database is obtained using the thermodynamic model proposed earlier.

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperatures (Russian Federation)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22617093
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Experimental and Theoretical Physics; Journal Volume: 124; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2017 Pleiades Publishing, Inc.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; EVAPORATION; HEAT; LIQUIDS; PHASE TRANSFORMATIONS; SEMICONDUCTOR MATERIALS; SOLIDS; THERMODYNAMIC MODEL; THERMODYNAMICS; TRANSITION ELEMENTS; VAPORS

Citation Formats

Khomkin, A. L., E-mail: alhomkin@mail.ru, and Shumikhin, A. S., E-mail: shum-ac@mail.ru. Effect of solid-state characteristics on the critical parameters of the vapor–liquid phase transition. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1134/S1063776116150036.
Khomkin, A. L., E-mail: alhomkin@mail.ru, & Shumikhin, A. S., E-mail: shum-ac@mail.ru. Effect of solid-state characteristics on the critical parameters of the vapor–liquid phase transition. United States. doi:10.1134/S1063776116150036.
Khomkin, A. L., E-mail: alhomkin@mail.ru, and Shumikhin, A. S., E-mail: shum-ac@mail.ru. Sun . "Effect of solid-state characteristics on the critical parameters of the vapor–liquid phase transition". United States. doi:10.1134/S1063776116150036.
@article{osti_22617093,
title = {Effect of solid-state characteristics on the critical parameters of the vapor–liquid phase transition},
author = {Khomkin, A. L., E-mail: alhomkin@mail.ru and Shumikhin, A. S., E-mail: shum-ac@mail.ru},
abstractNote = {Database for the critical point parameters of almost all metals (including transition metals) and semiconductors is used to derive a number of empirical expressions to relate these parameters to the heat of evaporation, the normal density, and the isothermal bulk modulus of these substances in a solid state under normal conditions. The database is obtained using the thermodynamic model proposed earlier.},
doi = {10.1134/S1063776116150036},
journal = {Journal of Experimental and Theoretical Physics},
number = 1,
volume = 124,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 15 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Sun Jan 15 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}
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