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Title: Experimental evaluation of electrical conductivity imaging of anisotropic brain tissues using a combination of diffusion tensor imaging and magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography

Abstract

Anisotropy of biological tissues is a low-frequency phenomenon that is associated with the function and structure of cell membranes. Imaging of anisotropic conductivity has potential for the analysis of interactions between electromagnetic fields and biological systems, such as the prediction of current pathways in electrical stimulation therapy. To improve application to the clinical environment, precise approaches are required to understand the exact responses inside the human body subjected to the stimulated currents. In this study, we experimentally evaluate the anisotropic conductivity tensor distribution of canine brain tissues, using a recently developed diffusion tensor-magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography method. At low frequency, electrical conductivity of the biological tissues can be expressed as a product of the mobility and concentration of ions in the extracellular space. From diffusion tensor images of the brain, we can obtain directional information on diffusive movements of water molecules, which correspond to the mobility of ions. The position dependent scale factor, which provides information on ion concentration, was successfully calculated from the magnetic flux density, to obtain the equivalent conductivity tensor. By combining the information from both techniques, we can finally reconstruct the anisotropic conductivity tensor images of brain tissues. The reconstructed conductivity images better demonstrate themore » enhanced signal intensity in strongly anisotropic brain regions, compared with those resulting from previous methods using a global scale factor.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1];  [2];  [3];  [4]
  1. Department of Biomedical Engineering, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 02447 (Korea, Republic of)
  2. Department of Pharmacology, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 06974 (Korea, Republic of)
  3. Department of East-West Medical Science, Kyung Hee University, Yongin 17104 (Korea, Republic of)
  4. Department of Mathematics, Konkuk University, Seoul 05029 (Korea, Republic of)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22611533
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Advances; Journal Volume: 6; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 Author(s); Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; ANIMAL TISSUES; ANISOTROPY; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; BRAIN; CURRENTS; DIFFUSION; DISTRIBUTION; ELECTRIC CONDUCTIVITY; ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS; EXTRACELLULAR SPACE; FLUX DENSITY; INTERACTIONS; MAGNETIC FLUX; MAGNETIC RESONANCE; MOBILITY; MOLECULES; STIMULATION; THERAPY; TOMOGRAPHY; WATER

Citation Formats

Sajib, Saurav Z. K., Jeong, Woo Chul, Oh, Tong In, Kim, Hyung Joong, E-mail: bmekim@khu.ac.kr, E-mail: ejwoo@khu.ac.kr, Woo, Eung Je, E-mail: bmekim@khu.ac.kr, E-mail: ejwoo@khu.ac.kr, Kyung, Eun Jung, Kim, Hyun Bum, and Kwon, Oh In. Experimental evaluation of electrical conductivity imaging of anisotropic brain tissues using a combination of diffusion tensor imaging and magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4953893.
Sajib, Saurav Z. K., Jeong, Woo Chul, Oh, Tong In, Kim, Hyung Joong, E-mail: bmekim@khu.ac.kr, E-mail: ejwoo@khu.ac.kr, Woo, Eung Je, E-mail: bmekim@khu.ac.kr, E-mail: ejwoo@khu.ac.kr, Kyung, Eun Jung, Kim, Hyun Bum, & Kwon, Oh In. Experimental evaluation of electrical conductivity imaging of anisotropic brain tissues using a combination of diffusion tensor imaging and magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4953893.
Sajib, Saurav Z. K., Jeong, Woo Chul, Oh, Tong In, Kim, Hyung Joong, E-mail: bmekim@khu.ac.kr, E-mail: ejwoo@khu.ac.kr, Woo, Eung Je, E-mail: bmekim@khu.ac.kr, E-mail: ejwoo@khu.ac.kr, Kyung, Eun Jung, Kim, Hyun Bum, and Kwon, Oh In. Wed . "Experimental evaluation of electrical conductivity imaging of anisotropic brain tissues using a combination of diffusion tensor imaging and magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4953893.
@article{osti_22611533,
title = {Experimental evaluation of electrical conductivity imaging of anisotropic brain tissues using a combination of diffusion tensor imaging and magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography},
author = {Sajib, Saurav Z. K. and Jeong, Woo Chul and Oh, Tong In and Kim, Hyung Joong, E-mail: bmekim@khu.ac.kr, E-mail: ejwoo@khu.ac.kr and Woo, Eung Je, E-mail: bmekim@khu.ac.kr, E-mail: ejwoo@khu.ac.kr and Kyung, Eun Jung and Kim, Hyun Bum and Kwon, Oh In},
abstractNote = {Anisotropy of biological tissues is a low-frequency phenomenon that is associated with the function and structure of cell membranes. Imaging of anisotropic conductivity has potential for the analysis of interactions between electromagnetic fields and biological systems, such as the prediction of current pathways in electrical stimulation therapy. To improve application to the clinical environment, precise approaches are required to understand the exact responses inside the human body subjected to the stimulated currents. In this study, we experimentally evaluate the anisotropic conductivity tensor distribution of canine brain tissues, using a recently developed diffusion tensor-magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography method. At low frequency, electrical conductivity of the biological tissues can be expressed as a product of the mobility and concentration of ions in the extracellular space. From diffusion tensor images of the brain, we can obtain directional information on diffusive movements of water molecules, which correspond to the mobility of ions. The position dependent scale factor, which provides information on ion concentration, was successfully calculated from the magnetic flux density, to obtain the equivalent conductivity tensor. By combining the information from both techniques, we can finally reconstruct the anisotropic conductivity tensor images of brain tissues. The reconstructed conductivity images better demonstrate the enhanced signal intensity in strongly anisotropic brain regions, compared with those resulting from previous methods using a global scale factor.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4953893},
journal = {AIP Advances},
number = 6,
volume = 6,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}