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Title: Enhanced solar evaporation of water from porous media, through capillary mediated forces and surface treatment

Abstract

The relative influence of the capillary, Marangoni, and hydrophobic forces in mediating the evaporation of water from carbon foam based porous media, in response to incident solar radiation, are investigated. It is indicated that inducing hydrophilic interactions on the surface, through nitric acid treatment of the foams, has a similar effect to reduced pore diameter and the ensuing capillary forces. The efficiency of water evaporation may be parameterized through the Capillary number (Ca), with a lower Ca being preferred. The proposed study is of much relevance to efficient solar energy utilization.

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22611375
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Advances; Journal Volume: 6; Journal Issue: 8; Other Information: (c) 2016 Author(s); Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; CAPILLARIES; CARBON; EFFICIENCY; ENERGY CONSUMPTION; EVAPORATION; INTERACTIONS; NITRIC ACID; POROUS MATERIALS; SOLAR ENERGY; SOLAR RADIATION; SURFACE TREATMENTS; SURFACES

Citation Formats

Canbazoglu, F. M., Fan, B., Kargar, A., Vemuri, K., and Bandaru, P. R., E-mail: pbandaru@ucsd.edu. Enhanced solar evaporation of water from porous media, through capillary mediated forces and surface treatment. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4961945.
Canbazoglu, F. M., Fan, B., Kargar, A., Vemuri, K., & Bandaru, P. R., E-mail: pbandaru@ucsd.edu. Enhanced solar evaporation of water from porous media, through capillary mediated forces and surface treatment. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4961945.
Canbazoglu, F. M., Fan, B., Kargar, A., Vemuri, K., and Bandaru, P. R., E-mail: pbandaru@ucsd.edu. 2016. "Enhanced solar evaporation of water from porous media, through capillary mediated forces and surface treatment". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4961945.
@article{osti_22611375,
title = {Enhanced solar evaporation of water from porous media, through capillary mediated forces and surface treatment},
author = {Canbazoglu, F. M. and Fan, B. and Kargar, A. and Vemuri, K. and Bandaru, P. R., E-mail: pbandaru@ucsd.edu},
abstractNote = {The relative influence of the capillary, Marangoni, and hydrophobic forces in mediating the evaporation of water from carbon foam based porous media, in response to incident solar radiation, are investigated. It is indicated that inducing hydrophilic interactions on the surface, through nitric acid treatment of the foams, has a similar effect to reduced pore diameter and the ensuing capillary forces. The efficiency of water evaporation may be parameterized through the Capillary number (Ca), with a lower Ca being preferred. The proposed study is of much relevance to efficient solar energy utilization.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4961945},
journal = {AIP Advances},
number = 8,
volume = 6,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}
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