skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: FLASH2: Operation, beamlines, and photon diagnostics

Abstract

FLASH2, a major extension of the soft X-ray free-electron laser FLASH at DESY, turns FLASH into a multi-user FEL facility. A new undulator line is located in a separate accelerator tunnel and driven additionally by the FLASH linear accelerator. First lasing of FLASH2 was achieved in August 2014 with simultaneous user operation at FLASH1. The new FLASH2 experimental hall offers space for up to six experimental end stations, some of which will be installed permanently. The wide wavelength range spans from 4-60 nm and 0.8 nm in the 5{sup th} harmonic and in the future deep into the water window in the fundamental. While this is of high interest to users, it is challenging from the beamline instrumentation point of view. Online diagnostics - which are mostly pulse resolved - for beam intensity, position, wavelength, wave front, and pulse length have been to a large extent developed at FLASH(1) and have now been optimized for FLASH2. Pump-probe facilities for XUV-XUV, XUV optical and XUV-THz experiments will complete the FLASH2 user facility.

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestr. 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22608304
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 1741; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: SRI2015: 12. international conference on synchrotron radiation instrumentation, New York, NY (United States), 6-10 Jul 2015; Other Information: (c) 2016 Author(s); Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; BEAMS; DESY; ELECTRONS; EXTREME ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION; FREE ELECTRON LASERS; LINEAR ACCELERATORS; OPERATION; PHOTONS; PROBES; SOFT X RADIATION; WATER; WAVELENGTHS; WIGGLER MAGNETS

Citation Formats

Plönjes, Elke, E-mail: elke.ploenjes@desy.de, Faatz, Bart, Kuhlmann, Marion, and Treusch, Rolf. FLASH2: Operation, beamlines, and photon diagnostics. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4952787.
Plönjes, Elke, E-mail: elke.ploenjes@desy.de, Faatz, Bart, Kuhlmann, Marion, & Treusch, Rolf. FLASH2: Operation, beamlines, and photon diagnostics. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4952787.
Plönjes, Elke, E-mail: elke.ploenjes@desy.de, Faatz, Bart, Kuhlmann, Marion, and Treusch, Rolf. 2016. "FLASH2: Operation, beamlines, and photon diagnostics". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4952787.
@article{osti_22608304,
title = {FLASH2: Operation, beamlines, and photon diagnostics},
author = {Plönjes, Elke, E-mail: elke.ploenjes@desy.de and Faatz, Bart and Kuhlmann, Marion and Treusch, Rolf},
abstractNote = {FLASH2, a major extension of the soft X-ray free-electron laser FLASH at DESY, turns FLASH into a multi-user FEL facility. A new undulator line is located in a separate accelerator tunnel and driven additionally by the FLASH linear accelerator. First lasing of FLASH2 was achieved in August 2014 with simultaneous user operation at FLASH1. The new FLASH2 experimental hall offers space for up to six experimental end stations, some of which will be installed permanently. The wide wavelength range spans from 4-60 nm and 0.8 nm in the 5{sup th} harmonic and in the future deep into the water window in the fundamental. While this is of high interest to users, it is challenging from the beamline instrumentation point of view. Online diagnostics - which are mostly pulse resolved - for beam intensity, position, wavelength, wave front, and pulse length have been to a large extent developed at FLASH(1) and have now been optimized for FLASH2. Pump-probe facilities for XUV-XUV, XUV optical and XUV-THz experiments will complete the FLASH2 user facility.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4952787},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 1741,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 7
}
  • We present the planned photon diagnostics beamlines at the Advanced Photon Source. The photon diagnostics beamlines of the storage ring include two bending magnet sources and a dedicated diagnostic undulator. The bending magnet lines will employ the conventional UV/visible imaging techniques (resolution {sigma}{congruent}40 {mu}m) and the x-ray pinhole camera (resolution {sigma}{congruent}15 {mu}m) for the measurement of the positron beam size (design value: {sigma}{congruent}100 {mu}m). The opening angle of the undulator radiation will be around {sigma}{congruent}3 {mu}rad for its first harmonic (23.2--25.8 keV), and {sigma}{congruent}1.7 {mu}rad for its third harmonic (70--72 keV), providing a good resolution for measuring the positron beammore » divergence size (design values: {sigma}{congruent}9 {mu}rad for 10% vertical coupling and 3 {mu}rad for 1% coupling). The undulator and its x-ray optics are specifically optimized for full emittance measurement of the positron beam. A major developmental effort will be in the area of detecting very fast phenomena (nanosecond and sub-nanosecond) in particle dynamics. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.« less
  • The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is the first hard-x-ray free electron laser in operation. The turn-on of LCLS was rapid and operation has been reliable. Performance has exceeded the design parameters in several areas. The photon energy output covers a range from 480 eV to over 9 keV; the pulse energy is typically 2-3 mJ, with a maximum of 4 mJ at 2 keV. Electron pulse lengths can be varied from 500 fs to shorter than 10 fs. A low-charge option at 20 pC is being explored, which delivers pulses shorter than 10 fs with a reduced pulse energy,more » typically around 0.2 mJ. On-demand, single-shot and multi-shot modes up to 60 Hz (planned is 120 Hz) can be made available. The photon diagnostics built for LCLS have been commissioned and provide measurements of various properties of the FEL beam, such as pulse energy, beam size and position, wavelength, and allows for intensity attenuation over the entire wavelength range. The two soft x-ray instruments, the Atomic Molecular and Optics (AMO) and Soft X-ray Material Science (SXR) stations, are fully operational and completed their second user run in mid September 2010. The third user run is scheduled from October to December 2010, and will include the first hard x-ray instrument X-ray Pump-and-Probe (XPP). Three additional hard x-ray stations will follow: CXI (Coherent X-ray Imaging) is planned to start commissioning in December 2010, the XCS (X-ray correlation spectroscopy) instrument will start in June 2011, and the station for Matter in Extreme Conditions (MEC) in 2012. A list of past and future milestones for LCLS commission and operations is shown in table 1. The LCLS hard x-ray Free Electron Laser at SLAC reported first lasing in April of 2009. Since then two successful user runs have been completed at the two soft x-ray stations. The first hard x-ray station has started commissioning in July of 2010. Beam diagnostics play an essential role for tuning the machine and delivering the requested beam properties to the users. An overview of the LCLS photon diagnostics will be presented including some selected commissioning results. Plans for future improvements and upgrades will be briefly discussed.« less
  • RIKEN Structural Genomics Beamlines (BL26B1 and BL26B2) at SPring-8 have been constructed for high throughput protein crystallography. The beamline operation is automated cooperating with the sample changer robot. The operation software provides a centralized control utilizing the client and server architecture. The sample management system with the networked database has been implemented to accept dry-shipped crystals from distant users.
  • A compact YAG (Chromium Doped Yttrium Aluminum Garnet - Cr4+:YAG) imaging system has been designed as a diagnostic tool for monochromatic x-rays emanating from the first 'Hard' x-ray dual-canted undulator at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. This imaging system consists of a flat YAG crystal, right angle prism/mirror, video camera and monitor. A flat YAG crystal with a diameter of 10 mm has been installed in vacuum and positioned downstream of the monochromator of the insertion device beamline. Another 20 mm diameter YAG crystal has been installed in vacuum after the horizontal deflecting mirrors of the secondmore » insertion device beamline. CCD cameras are mounted in air close to the window of the vacuum ports to image the fluorescence of the YAG crystals. An additional 25 mm diameter YAG crystal has been used for K-B (Kirkpatrick-Baez) mirror focusing and beamline alignment. These YAG imaging systems have greatly facilitated beamline commissioning as well as sample alignment to the x-ray beam in the macromolecular crystallography endstation. An overview of the optics design, mechanical design and the performance of these devices will be presented in the paper.« less
  • We present an overview of the two SPring-8 diagnostics beamlines, the beamline I (dipole magnet source) and II (insertion device source). At the beamline I, synchrotron radiation (SR) in both the X-ray and the visible bands is exploited for characterizations of the electron beam. At the beamline II, by observing the spectral, spatial, and temporal characteristics of X-ray SR of the insertion device (ID), new techniques for accelerator diagnostics are investigated. Irradiation experiments with the ID to develop accelerator components such as photon absorbers, and production of intensive 10 MeV {gamma}-rays by backward Compton scattering of external far infrared (FIR)more » laser photons are being prepared at the beamline II.« less