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Title: Electrohydrodynamic printing of organic polymeric resistors on flat and uneven surfaces

Abstract

In materials printing applications, the ability to generate fine droplets is critical for achieving high-resolution features. Other desirable characteristics are high print speeds, large stand-off distances, and minimal instrumentation requirements. In this work, a tunable electrohydrodynamic (EHD) printing technique capable of generating micron-sized droplets is reported. This method was used to print organic resistors on flat and uneven substrates. These ubiquitous electronic components were built using the commercial polymer-based conductive ink poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS), which has been widely used in the manufacturing of organic electronic devices. Resistors with widths from 50 to 500 μm and resistances from 1 to 70 Ω/μm were created. An array of emission modes for EHD printing was identified. Among these, the most promising is the microdripping mode, where droplets 10 times smaller than the nozzle's inner diameter were created at frequencies in excess of 5 kHz. It was found that the ink flow rate, applied voltage, and stand-off distance all significantly influence the droplet generation frequency. In particular, the experimental results reveal that the frequency increases nonlinearly with the applied voltage. The non-Newtonian shear thinning behavior of PEDOT:PSS strongly influenced the droplet frequency. Finally, the topology of a 3-dimensional target substrate had a significant effect on the structuremore » and function of a printed resistor.« less

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Department of Mechanical Engineering, State University of New York at Binghamton, Binghamton, New York 13902 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22598881
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Applied Physics; Journal Volume: 120; Journal Issue: 8; Other Information: (c) 2016 Author(s); Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; 75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; DISTANCE; DROPLETS; ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT; FLOW RATE; KHZ RANGE; NONLINEAR PROBLEMS; POLYMERS; RESISTORS; RESOLUTION; SUBSTRATES; SURFACES; TOPOLOGY; WIDTH

Citation Formats

Maktabi, Sepehr, and Chiarot, Paul R., E-mail: pchiarot@binghamton.edu. Electrohydrodynamic printing of organic polymeric resistors on flat and uneven surfaces. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4961421.
Maktabi, Sepehr, & Chiarot, Paul R., E-mail: pchiarot@binghamton.edu. Electrohydrodynamic printing of organic polymeric resistors on flat and uneven surfaces. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4961421.
Maktabi, Sepehr, and Chiarot, Paul R., E-mail: pchiarot@binghamton.edu. Sun . "Electrohydrodynamic printing of organic polymeric resistors on flat and uneven surfaces". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4961421.
@article{osti_22598881,
title = {Electrohydrodynamic printing of organic polymeric resistors on flat and uneven surfaces},
author = {Maktabi, Sepehr and Chiarot, Paul R., E-mail: pchiarot@binghamton.edu},
abstractNote = {In materials printing applications, the ability to generate fine droplets is critical for achieving high-resolution features. Other desirable characteristics are high print speeds, large stand-off distances, and minimal instrumentation requirements. In this work, a tunable electrohydrodynamic (EHD) printing technique capable of generating micron-sized droplets is reported. This method was used to print organic resistors on flat and uneven substrates. These ubiquitous electronic components were built using the commercial polymer-based conductive ink poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS), which has been widely used in the manufacturing of organic electronic devices. Resistors with widths from 50 to 500 μm and resistances from 1 to 70 Ω/μm were created. An array of emission modes for EHD printing was identified. Among these, the most promising is the microdripping mode, where droplets 10 times smaller than the nozzle's inner diameter were created at frequencies in excess of 5 kHz. It was found that the ink flow rate, applied voltage, and stand-off distance all significantly influence the droplet generation frequency. In particular, the experimental results reveal that the frequency increases nonlinearly with the applied voltage. The non-Newtonian shear thinning behavior of PEDOT:PSS strongly influenced the droplet frequency. Finally, the topology of a 3-dimensional target substrate had a significant effect on the structure and function of a printed resistor.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4961421},
journal = {Journal of Applied Physics},
number = 8,
volume = 120,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Aug 28 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Sun Aug 28 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
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  • Atomic layer deposition (ALD) has been employed as a new synthetic route to thin films of cobalt sulfide on silicon and fluorine-doped tin oxide platforms. The self-limiting nature of the stepwise synthesis is established through growth rate studies at different pulse times and temperatures. Additionally, characterization of the materials by X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicates that the crystalline phase of these films has the composition Co 9S 8. The nodes of the metal–organic framework (MOF) NU-1000 were then selectively functionalized with cobalt sulfide via ALD in MOFs (AIM). Spectroscopic techniques confirm uniform deposition of cobalt sulfide throughout themore » crystallites, with no loss in crystallinity or porosity. The resulting material, CoS-AIM, is catalytically active for selective hydrogenation of m-nitrophenol to m-aminophenol, and outperforms the analogous oxide AIM material (CoO-AIM) as well as an amorphous CoS x reference material. Here, these results reveal AIM to be an effective method of incorporating high surface area and catalytically active cobalt sulfide in metal–organic frameworks.« less
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