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Title: Phase response curves for models of earthquake fault dynamics

Abstract

We systematically study effects of external perturbations on models describing earthquake fault dynamics. The latter are based on the framework of the Burridge-Knopoff spring-block system, including the cases of a simple mono-block fault, as well as the paradigmatic complex faults made up of two identical or distinct blocks. The blocks exhibit relaxation oscillations, which are representative for the stick-slip behavior typical for earthquake dynamics. Our analysis is carried out by determining the phase response curves of first and second order. For a mono-block fault, we consider the impact of a single and two successive pulse perturbations, further demonstrating how the profile of phase response curves depends on the fault parameters. For a homogeneous two-block fault, our focus is on the scenario where each of the blocks is influenced by a single pulse, whereas for heterogeneous faults, we analyze how the response of the system depends on whether the stimulus is applied to the block having a shorter or a longer oscillation period.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [5];  [6];  [5];  [7];  [7]
  1. Scientific Computing Laboratory, Institute of Physics Belgrade, University of Belgrade, Pregrevica 118, 11080 Belgrade (Serbia)
  2. Institute for the Development of Water Resources “Jaroslav Černi,” Jaroslava Černog 80, 11226 Belgrade (Serbia)
  3. Faculty of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, University of Maribor, Koroška cesta 160, SI-2000 Maribor (Slovenia)
  4. (Slovenia)
  5. Institute of Applied Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 46 Ulyanov Street, 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation)
  6. (Russian Federation)
  7. (Germany)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22596691
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Chaos (Woodbury, N. Y.); Journal Volume: 26; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 Author(s); Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; 97 MATHEMATICAL METHODS AND COMPUTING; DIAGRAMS; DISTURBANCES; EARTHQUAKES; OSCILLATIONS; PULSES

Citation Formats

Franović, Igor, E-mail: franovic@ipb.ac.rs, Kostić, Srdjan, Perc, Matjaž, CAMTP—Center for Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Maribor, Krekova 2, SI-2000 Maribor, Klinshov, Vladimir, Nekorkin, Vladimir, University of Nizhny Novgorod, 23 Prospekt Gagarina, 603950 Nizhny Novgorod, Kurths, Jürgen, Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, 14412 Potsdam, and Institute of Physics, Humboldt University Berlin, 12489 Berlin. Phase response curves for models of earthquake fault dynamics. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4953471.
Franović, Igor, E-mail: franovic@ipb.ac.rs, Kostić, Srdjan, Perc, Matjaž, CAMTP—Center for Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Maribor, Krekova 2, SI-2000 Maribor, Klinshov, Vladimir, Nekorkin, Vladimir, University of Nizhny Novgorod, 23 Prospekt Gagarina, 603950 Nizhny Novgorod, Kurths, Jürgen, Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, 14412 Potsdam, & Institute of Physics, Humboldt University Berlin, 12489 Berlin. Phase response curves for models of earthquake fault dynamics. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4953471.
Franović, Igor, E-mail: franovic@ipb.ac.rs, Kostić, Srdjan, Perc, Matjaž, CAMTP—Center for Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Maribor, Krekova 2, SI-2000 Maribor, Klinshov, Vladimir, Nekorkin, Vladimir, University of Nizhny Novgorod, 23 Prospekt Gagarina, 603950 Nizhny Novgorod, Kurths, Jürgen, Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, 14412 Potsdam, and Institute of Physics, Humboldt University Berlin, 12489 Berlin. 2016. "Phase response curves for models of earthquake fault dynamics". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4953471.
@article{osti_22596691,
title = {Phase response curves for models of earthquake fault dynamics},
author = {Franović, Igor, E-mail: franovic@ipb.ac.rs and Kostić, Srdjan and Perc, Matjaž and CAMTP—Center for Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Maribor, Krekova 2, SI-2000 Maribor and Klinshov, Vladimir and Nekorkin, Vladimir and University of Nizhny Novgorod, 23 Prospekt Gagarina, 603950 Nizhny Novgorod and Kurths, Jürgen and Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, 14412 Potsdam and Institute of Physics, Humboldt University Berlin, 12489 Berlin},
abstractNote = {We systematically study effects of external perturbations on models describing earthquake fault dynamics. The latter are based on the framework of the Burridge-Knopoff spring-block system, including the cases of a simple mono-block fault, as well as the paradigmatic complex faults made up of two identical or distinct blocks. The blocks exhibit relaxation oscillations, which are representative for the stick-slip behavior typical for earthquake dynamics. Our analysis is carried out by determining the phase response curves of first and second order. For a mono-block fault, we consider the impact of a single and two successive pulse perturbations, further demonstrating how the profile of phase response curves depends on the fault parameters. For a homogeneous two-block fault, our focus is on the scenario where each of the blocks is influenced by a single pulse, whereas for heterogeneous faults, we analyze how the response of the system depends on whether the stimulus is applied to the block having a shorter or a longer oscillation period.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4953471},
journal = {Chaos (Woodbury, N. Y.)},
number = 6,
volume = 26,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
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