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Title: A digital matched filter for reverse time chaos

Abstract

The use of reverse time chaos allows the realization of hardware chaotic systems that can operate at speeds equivalent to existing state of the art while requiring significantly less complex circuitry. Matched filter decoding is possible for the reverse time system since it exhibits a closed form solution formed partially by a linear basis pulse. Coefficients have been calculated and are used to realize the matched filter digitally as a finite impulse response filter. Numerical simulations confirm that this correctly implements a matched filter that can be used for detection of the chaotic signal. In addition, the direct form of the filter has been implemented in hardware description language and demonstrates performance in agreement with numerical results.

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama 36489 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22596608
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Chaos (Woodbury, N. Y.); Journal Volume: 26; Journal Issue: 7; Other Information: (c) 2016 Author(s); Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; 97 MATHEMATICAL METHODS AND COMPUTING; CHAOS THEORY; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; DIGITAL FILTERS; PULSES; SIGNALS

Citation Formats

Bailey, J. Phillip, E-mail: mchamilton@auburn.edu, Beal, Aubrey N., Dean, Robert N., and Hamilton, Michael C. A digital matched filter for reverse time chaos. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4955269.
Bailey, J. Phillip, E-mail: mchamilton@auburn.edu, Beal, Aubrey N., Dean, Robert N., & Hamilton, Michael C. A digital matched filter for reverse time chaos. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4955269.
Bailey, J. Phillip, E-mail: mchamilton@auburn.edu, Beal, Aubrey N., Dean, Robert N., and Hamilton, Michael C. 2016. "A digital matched filter for reverse time chaos". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4955269.
@article{osti_22596608,
title = {A digital matched filter for reverse time chaos},
author = {Bailey, J. Phillip, E-mail: mchamilton@auburn.edu and Beal, Aubrey N. and Dean, Robert N. and Hamilton, Michael C.},
abstractNote = {The use of reverse time chaos allows the realization of hardware chaotic systems that can operate at speeds equivalent to existing state of the art while requiring significantly less complex circuitry. Matched filter decoding is possible for the reverse time system since it exhibits a closed form solution formed partially by a linear basis pulse. Coefficients have been calculated and are used to realize the matched filter digitally as a finite impulse response filter. Numerical simulations confirm that this correctly implements a matched filter that can be used for detection of the chaotic signal. In addition, the direct form of the filter has been implemented in hardware description language and demonstrates performance in agreement with numerical results.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4955269},
journal = {Chaos (Woodbury, N. Y.)},
number = 7,
volume = 26,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 7
}
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