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Title: Rewritable three-dimensional holographic data storage via optical forces

Abstract

The development of nanostructures that can be reversibly arranged and assembled into 3D patterns may enable optical tunability. However, current dynamic recording materials such as photorefractive polymers cannot be used to store information permanently while also retaining configurability. Here, we describe the synthesis and optimization of a silver nanoparticle doped poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-co-methacrylic acid) recording medium for reversibly recording 3D holograms. We theoretically and experimentally demonstrate organizing nanoparticles into 3D assemblies in the recording medium using optical forces produced by the gradients of standing waves. The nanoparticles in the recording medium are organized by multiple nanosecond laser pulses to produce reconfigurable slanted multilayer structures. We demonstrate the capability of producing rewritable optical elements such as multilayer Bragg diffraction gratings, 1D photonic crystals, and 3D multiplexed optical gratings. We also show that 3D virtual holograms can be reversibly recorded. This recording strategy may have applications in reconfigurable optical elements, data storage devices, and dynamic holographic displays.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4]
  1. Harvard Medical School and Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, 65 Landsdowne Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)
  2. (United States)
  3. Department of Chemistry, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)
  4. Nanotechnology Laboratory, School of Engineering Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22594338
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters; Journal Volume: 109; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 Author(s); Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; 75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; BRAGG REFLECTION; CRYSTALS; DIFFRACTION GRATINGS; DOPED MATERIALS; HOLOGRAPHY; LASERS; LAYERS; MEMORY DEVICES; METHACRYLATES; METHACRYLIC ACID; NANOPARTICLES; NANOSTRUCTURES; OPTIMIZATION; POLYMERS; SILVER; STANDING WAVES; THREE-DIMENSIONAL CALCULATIONS

Citation Formats

Yetisen, Ali K., E-mail: ayetisen@mgh.harvard.edu, Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, Montelongo, Yunuen, and Butt, Haider. Rewritable three-dimensional holographic data storage via optical forces. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4960710.
Yetisen, Ali K., E-mail: ayetisen@mgh.harvard.edu, Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, Montelongo, Yunuen, & Butt, Haider. Rewritable three-dimensional holographic data storage via optical forces. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4960710.
Yetisen, Ali K., E-mail: ayetisen@mgh.harvard.edu, Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, Montelongo, Yunuen, and Butt, Haider. 2016. "Rewritable three-dimensional holographic data storage via optical forces". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4960710.
@article{osti_22594338,
title = {Rewritable three-dimensional holographic data storage via optical forces},
author = {Yetisen, Ali K., E-mail: ayetisen@mgh.harvard.edu and Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 and Montelongo, Yunuen and Butt, Haider},
abstractNote = {The development of nanostructures that can be reversibly arranged and assembled into 3D patterns may enable optical tunability. However, current dynamic recording materials such as photorefractive polymers cannot be used to store information permanently while also retaining configurability. Here, we describe the synthesis and optimization of a silver nanoparticle doped poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-co-methacrylic acid) recording medium for reversibly recording 3D holograms. We theoretically and experimentally demonstrate organizing nanoparticles into 3D assemblies in the recording medium using optical forces produced by the gradients of standing waves. The nanoparticles in the recording medium are organized by multiple nanosecond laser pulses to produce reconfigurable slanted multilayer structures. We demonstrate the capability of producing rewritable optical elements such as multilayer Bragg diffraction gratings, 1D photonic crystals, and 3D multiplexed optical gratings. We also show that 3D virtual holograms can be reversibly recorded. This recording strategy may have applications in reconfigurable optical elements, data storage devices, and dynamic holographic displays.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4960710},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
number = 6,
volume = 109,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}
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