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Title: Zn precipitation and Li depletion in Zn implanted ZnO

Abstract

Ion implantation of Zn substituting elements in ZnO has been shown to result in a dramatic Li depletion of several microns in hydrothermally grown ZnO. This has been ascribed to a burst of mobile Zn interstials. In this study, we seek to understand the reason behind this interstitial mediated transient enhanced diffusion in Li-containing ZnO samples after Zn implantation. ZnO wafers were implanted with Zn to two doses, 5 × 10{sup 15} cm{sup −2} and 1 × 10{sup 17} cm{sup −2}. Secondary ion mass spectrometry was carried out to profile the Li depletion depth for different annealing temperatures between 600 and 800 °C. The 800 °C annealing had the most significant Li depletion of close to 60 μm. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was carried out in selected samples to identify the reason behind the Li depletion. In particular, TEM investigations of samples annealed at 750 °C show significant Zn precipitation just below the depth of the projected range of the implanted ions. We propose that the Zn precipitation is indicative of Zn supersaturation. Both the Li depletion and Zn precipitation are competing synchronous processes aimed at reducing the excess Zn interstitials.

Authors:
; ;  [1]; ;  [2];  [3]
  1. Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2601 (Australia)
  2. Department of Physics/Centre for Materials Science and Nanotechnology, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1048 Blindern, N-0316 Oslo (Norway)
  3. Australian National Fabrication Facility, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2601 (Australia)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22590595
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters; Journal Volume: 109; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: (c) 2016 Author(s); Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ANNEALING; DEPTH; INTERSTITIALS; MASS SPECTROSCOPY; PRECIPITATION; TEMPERATURE RANGE 0400-1000 K; TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY; ZINC OXIDES

Citation Formats

Chan, K. S., Jagadish, C., Wong-Leung, J., E-mail: jenny.wongleung@anu.edu.au, Vines, L., Svensson, B. G., and Li, L. Zn precipitation and Li depletion in Zn implanted ZnO. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4958693.
Chan, K. S., Jagadish, C., Wong-Leung, J., E-mail: jenny.wongleung@anu.edu.au, Vines, L., Svensson, B. G., & Li, L. Zn precipitation and Li depletion in Zn implanted ZnO. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4958693.
Chan, K. S., Jagadish, C., Wong-Leung, J., E-mail: jenny.wongleung@anu.edu.au, Vines, L., Svensson, B. G., and Li, L. Mon . "Zn precipitation and Li depletion in Zn implanted ZnO". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4958693.
@article{osti_22590595,
title = {Zn precipitation and Li depletion in Zn implanted ZnO},
author = {Chan, K. S. and Jagadish, C. and Wong-Leung, J., E-mail: jenny.wongleung@anu.edu.au and Vines, L. and Svensson, B. G. and Li, L.},
abstractNote = {Ion implantation of Zn substituting elements in ZnO has been shown to result in a dramatic Li depletion of several microns in hydrothermally grown ZnO. This has been ascribed to a burst of mobile Zn interstials. In this study, we seek to understand the reason behind this interstitial mediated transient enhanced diffusion in Li-containing ZnO samples after Zn implantation. ZnO wafers were implanted with Zn to two doses, 5 × 10{sup 15} cm{sup −2} and 1 × 10{sup 17} cm{sup −2}. Secondary ion mass spectrometry was carried out to profile the Li depletion depth for different annealing temperatures between 600 and 800 °C. The 800 °C annealing had the most significant Li depletion of close to 60 μm. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was carried out in selected samples to identify the reason behind the Li depletion. In particular, TEM investigations of samples annealed at 750 °C show significant Zn precipitation just below the depth of the projected range of the implanted ions. We propose that the Zn precipitation is indicative of Zn supersaturation. Both the Li depletion and Zn precipitation are competing synchronous processes aimed at reducing the excess Zn interstitials.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4958693},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
number = 2,
volume = 109,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jul 11 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Mon Jul 11 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
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  • No abstract prepared.