skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Local and transient nanoscale strain mapping during in situ deformation

Abstract

The mobility of defects such as dislocations controls the mechanical properties of metals. This mobility is determined both by the characteristics of the defect and the material, as well as the local stress and strain applied to the defect. Therefore, the knowledge of the stress and strain during deformation at the scale of defects is important for understanding fundamental deformation mechanisms. Here, we demonstrate a method of measuring local stresses and strains during continuous in situ deformation with a resolution of a few nanometers using nanodiffraction strain mapping. Our results demonstrate how large multidimensional data sets captured with high speed electron detectors can be analyzed in multiple ways after an in situ TEM experiment, opening the door for true multimodal analysis from a single electron scattering experiment.

Authors:
;  [1]; ;  [1];  [2];  [3];  [4]
  1. National Center for Electron Microscopy, Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)
  2. (United States)
  3. Gatan, Inc., Pleasanton, California 94588 (United States)
  4. Hysitron, Inc., Minneapolis, Minnesota 55344 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22590482
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters; Journal Volume: 109; Journal Issue: 8; Other Information: (c) 2016 Author(s); Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; DEFORMATION; DISLOCATIONS; MAPPING; MECHANICAL PROPERTIES; METALS; MOBILITY; NANOSTRUCTURES; RESOLUTION; SCATTERING; STRAINS; STRESSES; TRANSMISSION; TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY

Citation Formats

Gammer, C., E-mail: christoph.gammer@oeaw.ac.at, E-mail: aminor@lbl.gov, Ciston, J., Kacher, J., Minor, A. M., E-mail: christoph.gammer@oeaw.ac.at, E-mail: aminor@lbl.gov, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, Czarnik, C., and Warren, O. L. Local and transient nanoscale strain mapping during in situ deformation. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4961683.
Gammer, C., E-mail: christoph.gammer@oeaw.ac.at, E-mail: aminor@lbl.gov, Ciston, J., Kacher, J., Minor, A. M., E-mail: christoph.gammer@oeaw.ac.at, E-mail: aminor@lbl.gov, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, Czarnik, C., & Warren, O. L. Local and transient nanoscale strain mapping during in situ deformation. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4961683.
Gammer, C., E-mail: christoph.gammer@oeaw.ac.at, E-mail: aminor@lbl.gov, Ciston, J., Kacher, J., Minor, A. M., E-mail: christoph.gammer@oeaw.ac.at, E-mail: aminor@lbl.gov, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, Czarnik, C., and Warren, O. L. 2016. "Local and transient nanoscale strain mapping during in situ deformation". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4961683.
@article{osti_22590482,
title = {Local and transient nanoscale strain mapping during in situ deformation},
author = {Gammer, C., E-mail: christoph.gammer@oeaw.ac.at, E-mail: aminor@lbl.gov and Ciston, J. and Kacher, J. and Minor, A. M., E-mail: christoph.gammer@oeaw.ac.at, E-mail: aminor@lbl.gov and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 and Czarnik, C. and Warren, O. L.},
abstractNote = {The mobility of defects such as dislocations controls the mechanical properties of metals. This mobility is determined both by the characteristics of the defect and the material, as well as the local stress and strain applied to the defect. Therefore, the knowledge of the stress and strain during deformation at the scale of defects is important for understanding fundamental deformation mechanisms. Here, we demonstrate a method of measuring local stresses and strains during continuous in situ deformation with a resolution of a few nanometers using nanodiffraction strain mapping. Our results demonstrate how large multidimensional data sets captured with high speed electron detectors can be analyzed in multiple ways after an in situ TEM experiment, opening the door for true multimodal analysis from a single electron scattering experiment.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4961683},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
number = 8,
volume = 109,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}
  • The mobility of defects such as dislocations controls the mechanical properties of metals. This mobility is determined both by the characteristics of the defect and the material, as well as the local stress and strain applied to the defect. Therefore, the knowledge of the stress and strain during deformation at the scale of defects is important for understanding fundamental deformation mechanisms. In this paper, we demonstrate a method of measuring local stresses and strains during continuous in situ deformation with a resolution of a few nanometers using nanodiffraction strain mapping. Finally, our results demonstrate how large multidimensional data sets capturedmore » with high speed electron detectors can be analyzed in multiple ways after an in situ TEM experiment, opening the door for true multimodal analysis from a single electron scattering experiment.« less
  • A pioneer in-situ synchrotron X-ray nanodiffraction approach for characterization and visualization of strain fields induced by nanoindentation in amorphous materials is introduced. In-situ nanoindentation experiments were performed in transmission mode using a monochromatic and highly focused sub-micron X-ray beam on 40 μm thick Zr-based bulk metallic glass under two loading conditions. Spatially resolved X-ray diffraction scans in the deformed volume of Zr-based bulk metallic glass covering an area of 40 × 40 μm{sup 2} beneath the pyramidal indenter revealed two-dimensional map of elastic strains. The largest value of compressive elastic strain calculated from diffraction data at 1 N load was −0.65%. The region of highmore » elastic compressive strains (<−0.3%) is located beneath the indenter tip and has radius of 7 μm.« less
  • Different network structures of vulcanized polyisoprene rubbers were studied by in-situ ESR and synchrotron X-ray during deformation to analyze the rupture, orientation, and strain-induced crystallization of polymer chains and network points. Rupture of network points occur, depending on network structure, and create an un-reversible change in vulcanized rubber. The flexibility of network points affects the possibility of rupture, polymer orientation and strain-induced crystallization. Peroxide vulcanized network is rigid and un-rupturable. Poly-sulfide rich vulcanized network is more flexible and less rupturable than mono-sulfide rich vulcanized network. Chain flexibility and rupturability of network points affect the strain-induced crystallization and stress-strain relation.
  • The unique properties of nanodiamonds make them suitable for use in a wide range of applications, including as biomarkers for cellular tracking in vivo at the molecular level. The sustained fluorescence of nanodiamonds containing nitrogen-vacancy (N-V) centres is related to their internal structure and strain state. Theoretical studies predict that the location of the N-V centre and the nanodiamonds' residual elastic strain state have a major influence on their photoluminescence properties. However, to date there have been no direct measurements made of their spatially resolved deformation fields owing to the challenges that such measurements present. Here we apply the recentlymore » developed technique of Bragg coherent diffractive imaging (BCDI) to map the three-dimensional deformation field within a single nanodiamond of approximately 0.5 µm diameter. The results indicate that there are high levels of residual elastic strain present in the nanodiamond which could have a critical influence on its optical and electronic properties.« less