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Title: The social impacts of dams: A new framework for scholarly analysis

Abstract

No commonly used framework exists in the scholarly study of the social impacts of dams. This hinders comparisons of analyses and thus the accumulation of knowledge. The aim of this paper is to unify scholarly understanding of dams' social impacts via the analysis and aggregation of the various frameworks currently used in the scholarly literature. For this purpose, we have systematically analyzed and aggregated 27 frameworks employed by academics analyzing dams' social impacts (found in a set of 217 articles). A key finding of the analysis is that currently used frameworks are often not specific to dams and thus omit key impacts associated with them. The result of our analysis and aggregation is a new framework for scholarly analysis (which we call ‘matrix framework’) specifically on dams' social impacts, with space, time and value as its key dimensions as well as infrastructure, community and livelihood as its key components. Building on the scholarly understanding of this topic enables us to conceptualize the inherently complex and multidimensional issues of dams' social impacts in a holistic manner. If commonly employed in academia (and possibly in practice), this framework would enable more transparent assessment and comparison of projects.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22589259
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Environmental Impact Assessment Review; Journal Volume: 60; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2016 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
13 HYDRO ENERGY; DAMS; HYDROELECTRIC POWER; SOCIAL IMPACT

Citation Formats

Kirchherr, Julian, E-mail: julian.kirchherr@sant.ox.ac.uk, and Charles, Katrina J., E-mail: katrina.charles@ouce.ox.ac.uk. The social impacts of dams: A new framework for scholarly analysis. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1016/J.EIAR.2016.02.005.
Kirchherr, Julian, E-mail: julian.kirchherr@sant.ox.ac.uk, & Charles, Katrina J., E-mail: katrina.charles@ouce.ox.ac.uk. The social impacts of dams: A new framework for scholarly analysis. United States. doi:10.1016/J.EIAR.2016.02.005.
Kirchherr, Julian, E-mail: julian.kirchherr@sant.ox.ac.uk, and Charles, Katrina J., E-mail: katrina.charles@ouce.ox.ac.uk. 2016. "The social impacts of dams: A new framework for scholarly analysis". United States. doi:10.1016/J.EIAR.2016.02.005.
@article{osti_22589259,
title = {The social impacts of dams: A new framework for scholarly analysis},
author = {Kirchherr, Julian, E-mail: julian.kirchherr@sant.ox.ac.uk and Charles, Katrina J., E-mail: katrina.charles@ouce.ox.ac.uk},
abstractNote = {No commonly used framework exists in the scholarly study of the social impacts of dams. This hinders comparisons of analyses and thus the accumulation of knowledge. The aim of this paper is to unify scholarly understanding of dams' social impacts via the analysis and aggregation of the various frameworks currently used in the scholarly literature. For this purpose, we have systematically analyzed and aggregated 27 frameworks employed by academics analyzing dams' social impacts (found in a set of 217 articles). A key finding of the analysis is that currently used frameworks are often not specific to dams and thus omit key impacts associated with them. The result of our analysis and aggregation is a new framework for scholarly analysis (which we call ‘matrix framework’) specifically on dams' social impacts, with space, time and value as its key dimensions as well as infrastructure, community and livelihood as its key components. Building on the scholarly understanding of this topic enables us to conceptualize the inherently complex and multidimensional issues of dams' social impacts in a holistic manner. If commonly employed in academia (and possibly in practice), this framework would enable more transparent assessment and comparison of projects.},
doi = {10.1016/J.EIAR.2016.02.005},
journal = {Environmental Impact Assessment Review},
number = ,
volume = 60,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}
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