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Title: Effect of phase composition of calcium silicate phosphate component on properties of brushite based composite cements

Abstract

The composite cement mixtures were prepared by mixing brushite (B) with, the amorphous hydrated calcium silicate phosphate (CSPH) or annealed calcium silicate phosphate (CSP composed of Si-saturated hydroxyapatite, wollastonite and silica) phases and water as liquid component. The contents of the silicate-phosphate phase in composites were 10.30 and 50 wt%. The significant effect of both the Ca/P ratio and different solubility of calcium silicate phosphate component in starting cement systems on setting time and phase composition of the final composite cements was demonstrated. The compressive strength of the set cements increased with the filler addition and the highest value (~ 48 MPa) exhibited the 50CSP/B cement composite. The final setting times of the composite cements decreased with the CSPH addition from about 25 to 17 min in 50CSHP/B and setting time of CSP/B composites was around 30 min. The higher content of silica in cements caused the precipitation of fine hydroxyapatite particles in the form of nanoneedles or thin plates perpendicularly oriented to sample surface. The analysis of in vitro cement cytotoxicity demonstrated the strong reduction in cytotoxicity of 10CSPH/B composite with time of cultivation (a low cytotoxicity after 9 days of culture) contrary to cements with higher calcium silicate-phosphatemore » content. These results were attributed to the different surface topography of composite substrates and possible stimulation of cell proliferation by the slow continuously release of ions from 10CSPH/B cement. - Highlights: • Ca/P ratio and solubility of calcium silicate-phosphate components affect the self-setting properties of cements. • Strong relationship between the composite in vitro cytotoxicity and surface microtopography was demonstrated. • Plate-like morphology of coarser particles allowed cells to better adhere and proliferate as compared with nanoneedles.« less

Authors:
 [1]; ; ; ;  [1];  [2];  [1]
  1. Institute of Materials Research of SAS, Watsonova 47, 04001 Kosice (Slovakia)
  2. Institute of Physics, Faculty of Science, P. J. Šafárik University, Park Angelinum 9, 04001 Kosice (Slovakia)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22587162
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Materials Characterization; Journal Volume: 117; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2016 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 77 NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY; ANNEALING; APATITES; CALCIUM PHOSPHATES; CALCIUM SILICATES; CELL PROLIFERATION; CEMENTS; COARSE PARTICLES; COMPRESSION STRENGTH; MORPHOLOGY; PRECIPITATION; PRESSURE RANGE MEGA PA 10-100; SILICA

Citation Formats

Sopcak, T., E-mail: tsopcak@imr.saske.sk, Medvecky, L., Giretova, M., Stulajterova, R., Durisin, J., Girman, V., and Faberova, M.. Effect of phase composition of calcium silicate phosphate component on properties of brushite based composite cements. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1016/J.MATCHAR.2016.04.011.
Sopcak, T., E-mail: tsopcak@imr.saske.sk, Medvecky, L., Giretova, M., Stulajterova, R., Durisin, J., Girman, V., & Faberova, M.. Effect of phase composition of calcium silicate phosphate component on properties of brushite based composite cements. United States. doi:10.1016/J.MATCHAR.2016.04.011.
Sopcak, T., E-mail: tsopcak@imr.saske.sk, Medvecky, L., Giretova, M., Stulajterova, R., Durisin, J., Girman, V., and Faberova, M.. Fri . "Effect of phase composition of calcium silicate phosphate component on properties of brushite based composite cements". United States. doi:10.1016/J.MATCHAR.2016.04.011.
@article{osti_22587162,
title = {Effect of phase composition of calcium silicate phosphate component on properties of brushite based composite cements},
author = {Sopcak, T., E-mail: tsopcak@imr.saske.sk and Medvecky, L. and Giretova, M. and Stulajterova, R. and Durisin, J. and Girman, V. and Faberova, M.},
abstractNote = {The composite cement mixtures were prepared by mixing brushite (B) with, the amorphous hydrated calcium silicate phosphate (CSPH) or annealed calcium silicate phosphate (CSP composed of Si-saturated hydroxyapatite, wollastonite and silica) phases and water as liquid component. The contents of the silicate-phosphate phase in composites were 10.30 and 50 wt%. The significant effect of both the Ca/P ratio and different solubility of calcium silicate phosphate component in starting cement systems on setting time and phase composition of the final composite cements was demonstrated. The compressive strength of the set cements increased with the filler addition and the highest value (~ 48 MPa) exhibited the 50CSP/B cement composite. The final setting times of the composite cements decreased with the CSPH addition from about 25 to 17 min in 50CSHP/B and setting time of CSP/B composites was around 30 min. The higher content of silica in cements caused the precipitation of fine hydroxyapatite particles in the form of nanoneedles or thin plates perpendicularly oriented to sample surface. The analysis of in vitro cement cytotoxicity demonstrated the strong reduction in cytotoxicity of 10CSPH/B composite with time of cultivation (a low cytotoxicity after 9 days of culture) contrary to cements with higher calcium silicate-phosphate content. These results were attributed to the different surface topography of composite substrates and possible stimulation of cell proliferation by the slow continuously release of ions from 10CSPH/B cement. - Highlights: • Ca/P ratio and solubility of calcium silicate-phosphate components affect the self-setting properties of cements. • Strong relationship between the composite in vitro cytotoxicity and surface microtopography was demonstrated. • Plate-like morphology of coarser particles allowed cells to better adhere and proliferate as compared with nanoneedles.},
doi = {10.1016/J.MATCHAR.2016.04.011},
journal = {Materials Characterization},
number = ,
volume = 117,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jul 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Fri Jul 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
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