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Title: Realistic respiratory motion margins for external beam partial breast irradiation

Abstract

Purpose: Respiratory margins for partial breast irradiation (PBI) have been largely based on geometric observations, which may overestimate the margin required for dosimetric coverage. In this study, dosimetric population-based respiratory margins and margin formulas for external beam partial breast irradiation are determined. Methods: Volunteer respiratory data and anterior–posterior (AP) dose profiles from clinical treatment plans of 28 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) PBI patient plans were used to determine population-based respiratory margins. The peak-to-peak amplitudes (A) of realistic respiratory motion data from healthy volunteers were scaled from A = 1 to 10 mm to create respiratory motion probability density functions. Dose profiles were convolved with the respiratory probability density functions to produce blurred dose profiles accounting for respiratory motion. The required margins were found by measuring the distance between the simulated treatment and original dose profiles at the 95% isodose level. Results: The symmetric dosimetric respiratory margins to cover 90%, 95%, and 100% of the simulated treatment population were 1.5, 2, and 4 mm, respectively. With patient set up at end exhale, the required margins were larger in the anterior direction than the posterior. For respiratory amplitudes less than 5 mm, the population-based margins can be expressed as a fraction ofmore » the extent of respiratory motion. The derived formulas in the anterior/posterior directions for 90%, 95%, and 100% simulated population coverage were 0.45A/0.25A, 0.50A/0.30A, and 0.70A/0.40A. The differences in formulas for different population coverage criteria demonstrate that respiratory trace shape and baseline drift characteristics affect individual respiratory margins even for the same average peak-to-peak amplitude. Conclusions: A methodology for determining population-based respiratory margins using real respiratory motion patterns and dose profiles in the AP direction was described. It was found that the currently used respiratory margin of 5 mm in partial breast irradiation may be overly conservative for many 3DCRT PBI patients. Amplitude alone was found to be insufficient to determine patient-specific margins: individual respiratory trace shape and baseline drift both contributed to the dosimetric target coverage. With respiratory coaching, individualized respiratory margins smaller than the full extent of motion could reduce planning target volumes while ensuring adequate coverage under respiratory motion.« less

Authors:
;  [1];  [2];  [1];  [2];  [2]
  1. Department of Medical Physics, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta T2N 4N2 (Canada)
  2. (Canada)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22581367
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 42; Journal Issue: 9; Other Information: (c) 2015 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; AMPLITUDES; BEAMS; IRRADIATION; MAMMARY GLANDS; PATIENTS; PROBABILITY DENSITY FUNCTIONS; RADIATION DOSES; RADIOTHERAPY; SIMULATION

Citation Formats

Conroy, Leigh, Quirk, Sarah, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4, Smith, Wendy L., E-mail: wendy.smith@albertahealthservices.ca, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4, and Department of Oncology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4. Realistic respiratory motion margins for external beam partial breast irradiation. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4928141.
Conroy, Leigh, Quirk, Sarah, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4, Smith, Wendy L., E-mail: wendy.smith@albertahealthservices.ca, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4, & Department of Oncology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4. Realistic respiratory motion margins for external beam partial breast irradiation. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4928141.
Conroy, Leigh, Quirk, Sarah, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4, Smith, Wendy L., E-mail: wendy.smith@albertahealthservices.ca, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4, and Department of Oncology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4. 2015. "Realistic respiratory motion margins for external beam partial breast irradiation". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4928141.
@article{osti_22581367,
title = {Realistic respiratory motion margins for external beam partial breast irradiation},
author = {Conroy, Leigh and Quirk, Sarah and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 and Smith, Wendy L., E-mail: wendy.smith@albertahealthservices.ca and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 and Department of Oncology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4},
abstractNote = {Purpose: Respiratory margins for partial breast irradiation (PBI) have been largely based on geometric observations, which may overestimate the margin required for dosimetric coverage. In this study, dosimetric population-based respiratory margins and margin formulas for external beam partial breast irradiation are determined. Methods: Volunteer respiratory data and anterior–posterior (AP) dose profiles from clinical treatment plans of 28 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) PBI patient plans were used to determine population-based respiratory margins. The peak-to-peak amplitudes (A) of realistic respiratory motion data from healthy volunteers were scaled from A = 1 to 10 mm to create respiratory motion probability density functions. Dose profiles were convolved with the respiratory probability density functions to produce blurred dose profiles accounting for respiratory motion. The required margins were found by measuring the distance between the simulated treatment and original dose profiles at the 95% isodose level. Results: The symmetric dosimetric respiratory margins to cover 90%, 95%, and 100% of the simulated treatment population were 1.5, 2, and 4 mm, respectively. With patient set up at end exhale, the required margins were larger in the anterior direction than the posterior. For respiratory amplitudes less than 5 mm, the population-based margins can be expressed as a fraction of the extent of respiratory motion. The derived formulas in the anterior/posterior directions for 90%, 95%, and 100% simulated population coverage were 0.45A/0.25A, 0.50A/0.30A, and 0.70A/0.40A. The differences in formulas for different population coverage criteria demonstrate that respiratory trace shape and baseline drift characteristics affect individual respiratory margins even for the same average peak-to-peak amplitude. Conclusions: A methodology for determining population-based respiratory margins using real respiratory motion patterns and dose profiles in the AP direction was described. It was found that the currently used respiratory margin of 5 mm in partial breast irradiation may be overly conservative for many 3DCRT PBI patients. Amplitude alone was found to be insufficient to determine patient-specific margins: individual respiratory trace shape and baseline drift both contributed to the dosimetric target coverage. With respiratory coaching, individualized respiratory margins smaller than the full extent of motion could reduce planning target volumes while ensuring adequate coverage under respiratory motion.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4928141},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 9,
volume = 42,
place = {United States},
year = 2015,
month = 9
}
  • Purpose: To use magnetic resonance image guided radiation therapy (MR-IGRT) for accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI) to (1) determine intrafractional motion of the breast surgical cavity; and (2) assess delivered dose versus planned dose. Methods and Materials: Thirty women with breast cancer (stages 0-I) who underwent breast-conserving surgery were enrolled in a prospective registry evaluating APBI using a 0.35-T MR-IGRT system. Clinical target volume was defined as the surgical cavity plus a 1-cm margin (excluding chest wall, pectoral muscles, and 5 mm from skin). No additional margin was added for the planning target volume (PTV). A volumetric MR image was acquired beforemore » each fraction, and patients were set up to the surgical cavity as visualized on MR imaging. To determine the delivered dose for each fraction, the electron density map and contours from the computed tomography simulation were transferred to the pretreatment MR image via rigid registration. Intrafractional motion of the surgical cavity was determined by applying a tracking algorithm to the cavity contour as visualized on cine MR. Results: Median PTV volume was reduced by 52% when using no PTV margin compared with a 1-cm PTV margin used conventionally. The mean (± standard deviation) difference between planned and delivered dose to the PTV (V95) was 0.6% ± 0.1%. The mean cavity displacement in the anterior–posterior and superior–inferior directions was 0.6 ± 0.4 mm and 0.6 ± 0.3 mm, respectively. The mean margin required for at least 90% of the cavity to be contained by the margin for 90% of the time was 0.7 mm (5th-95th percentile: 0-2.7 mm). Conclusion: Minimal intrafractional motion was observed, and the mean difference between planned and delivered dose was less than 1%. Assessment of efficacy and cosmesis of this MR-guided APBI approach is under way.« less
  • Purpose: We present our ongoing clinical experience utilizing three-dimensional (3D)-conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in patients with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast-conserving therapy. Methods and Materials: Ninety-one consecutive patients were treated with APBI using our previously reported 3D-CRT technique. The clinical target volume consisted of the lumpectomy cavity plus a 10- to 15 -mm margin. The prescribed dose was 34 or 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions given over 5 consecutive days. The median follow-up was 24 months. Twelve patients have been followed for {>=}4 years, 20 for {>=}3.5 years, 29 for >3.0 years,more » 33 for {>=}2.5 years, and 46 for {>=}2.0 years. Results: No local recurrences developed. Cosmetic results were rated as good/excellent in 100% of evaluable patients at {>=} 6 months (n = 47), 93% at 1 year (n = 43), 91% at 2 years (n = 21), and in 90% at {>=}3 years (n = 10). Erythema, hyperpigmentation, breast edema, breast pain, telangiectasias, fibrosis, and fat necrosis were evaluated at 6, 24, and 36 months after treatment. All factors stabilized by 3 years posttreatment with grade I or II rates of 0%, 0%, 0%, 0%, 9%, 18%, and 9%, respectively. Only 2 patients (3%) developed grade III toxicity (breast pain), which resolved with time. Conclusions: Delivery of APBI with 3D-CRT resulted in minimal chronic ({>=}6 months) toxicity to date with good/excellent cosmetic results. Additional follow-up is needed to assess the long-term efficacy of this form of APBI.« less
  • Purpose: To determine whether three-dimensional conformal partial breast irradiation (3D-PBI) spares lung tissue compared with whole breast irradiation (WBI) and to include the biologically equivalent dose (BED) to account for differences in fractionation. Methods and Materials: Radiotherapy treatment plans were devised for WBI and 3D-PBI for 25 consecutive patients randomized on the NSABP B-39/RTOG 0413 protocol at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida. WBI plans were for 50 Gy in 25 fractions, and 3D-PBI plans were for 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions. Volume of ipsilateral lung receiving 2.5, 5, 10, and 20 Gy was recorded for each plan. The linear quadraticmore » equation was used to calculate the corresponding dose delivered in 10 fractions and volume of ipsilateral lung receiving these doses was recorded for PBI plans. Ipsilateral mean lung dose was recorded for each plan and converted to BED. Results: There was a significant decrease in volume of lung receiving 20 Gy with PBI (median, 4.4% vs. 7.5%; p < 0.001), which remained after correction for fractionation (median, 5.6% vs. 7.5%; p = 0.02). Mean lung dose was lower for PBI (median, 3.46 Gy vs. 4.57 Gy; p = 0.005), although this difference lost significance after conversion to BED (median, 3.86 Gy{sub 3} vs 4.85 Gy{sub 3}, p = 0.07). PBI plans exposed more lung to 2.5 and 5 Gy. Conclusions: 3D-PBI exposes greater volumes of lung tissue to low doses of radiation and spares the amount of lung receiving higher doses when compared with WBI.« less
  • A dosimetric comparison was performed on external-beam three-dimensional conformal partial breast irradiation (PBI) and whole breast irradiation (WBI) plans for patients enrolled in the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP) B-39/Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0413 protocol at our institution. Twenty-four consecutive patients were treated with either PBI (12 patients) or WBI (12 patients). In the PBI arm, the lumpectomy cavity was treated to a total dose of 38.5 Gy at 3.85 Gy per fraction twice daily using a four-field noncoplanar beam setup. A minimum 6 h interval was required between fractions. In the WBI arm, the wholemore » breast including the entirety of the lumpectomy cavity was treated to a total dose of 50.4 Gy at 1.8 Gy per fraction daily using opposed tangential beams. The lumpectomy cavity volume, planning target volume for evaluation (PTV{sub E}VAL), and critical structure volumes were contoured for both the PBI and WBI patients. Dosimetric parameters, dose volume histograms (DVHs), and generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) for target and critical structures were compared. Dosimetric results show the PBI plans, compared to the WBI plans, have smaller hot spots in the PTV{sub E}VAL (maximum dose: 104.2% versus 110.9%) and reduced dose to the ipsilateral breast (V50: 48.6% versus 92.1% and V100: 10.2% versus 50.5%), contralateral breast (V3: 0.16% versus 2.04%), ipsilateral lung (V30: 5.8% versus 12.7%), and thyroid (maximum dose: 0.5% versus 2.0%) with p values {<=}0.01. However, similar dose coverage of the PTV{sub E}VAL (98% for PBI and 99% for WBI, on average) was observed and the dose difference for other critical structures was clinically insignificant in both arms. The gEUD data analysis showed the reduction of dose to the ipsilateral breast and lung, contralateral breast and thyroid. In addition, preliminary dermatologic adverse event assessment data suggested reduced skin toxicity for patients treated with the PBI technique.« less
  • Purpose: To explore multiple proton beam configurations for optimizing dosimetry and minimizing uncertainties for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) and to compare the dosimetry of proton with that of photon radiotherapy for treatment of the same clinical volumes. Methods and Materials: Proton treatment plans were created for 11 sequential patients treated with three-dimensional radiotherapy (3DCRT) photon APBI using passive scattering proton beams (PSPB) and were compared with clinically treated 3DCRT photon plans. Monte Carlo calculations were used to verify the accuracy of the proton dose calculation from the treatment planning system. The impact of range, motion, and setup uncertainty wasmore » evaluated with tangential vs. en face beams. Results: Compared with 3DCRT photons, the absolute reduction of the mean of V100 (the volume receiving 100% of prescription dose), V90, V75, V50, and V20 for normal breast using protons are 3.4%, 8.6%, 11.8%, 17.9%, and 23.6%, respectively. For breast skin, with the similar V90 as 3DCRT photons, the proton plan significantly reduced V75, V50, V30, and V10. The proton plan also significantly reduced the dose to the lung and heart. Dose distributions from Monte Carlo simulations demonstrated minimal deviation from the treatment planning system. The tangential beam configuration showed significantly less dose fluctuation in the chest wall region but was more vulnerable to respiratory motion than that for the en face beams. Worst-case analysis demonstrated the robustness of designed proton beams with range and patient setup uncertainties. Conclusions: APBI using multiple proton beams spares significantly more normal tissue, including nontarget breast and breast skin, than 3DCRT using photons. It is robust, considering the range and patient setup uncertainties.« less