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Title: SAMBA: Sparse Approximation of Moment-Based Arbitrary Polynomial Chaos

Abstract

A new arbitrary Polynomial Chaos (aPC) method is presented for moderately high-dimensional problems characterised by limited input data availability. The proposed methodology improves the algorithm of aPC and extends the method, that was previously only introduced as tensor product expansion, to moderately high-dimensional stochastic problems. The fundamental idea of aPC is to use the statistical moments of the input random variables to develop the polynomial chaos expansion. This approach provides the possibility to propagate continuous or discrete probability density functions and also histograms (data sets) as long as their moments exist, are finite and the determinant of the moment matrix is strictly positive. For cases with limited data availability, this approach avoids bias and fitting errors caused by wrong assumptions. In this work, an alternative way to calculate the aPC is suggested, which provides the optimal polynomials, Gaussian quadrature collocation points and weights from the moments using only a handful of matrix operations on the Hankel matrix of moments. It can therefore be implemented without requiring prior knowledge about statistical data analysis or a detailed understanding of the mathematics of polynomial chaos expansions. The extension to more input variables suggested in this work, is an anisotropic and adaptive version ofmore » Smolyak's algorithm that is solely based on the moments of the input probability distributions. It is referred to as SAMBA (PC), which is short for Sparse Approximation of Moment-Based Arbitrary Polynomial Chaos. It is illustrated that for moderately high-dimensional problems (up to 20 different input variables or histograms) SAMBA can significantly simplify the calculation of sparse Gaussian quadrature rules. SAMBA's efficiency for multivariate functions with regard to data availability is further demonstrated by analysing higher order convergence and accuracy for a set of nonlinear test functions with 2, 5 and 10 different input distributions or histograms.« less

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22572343
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Computational Physics; Journal Volume: 320; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2016 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; ACCURACY; ALGORITHMS; APPROXIMATIONS; CHAOS THEORY; DATA ANALYSIS; DISTRIBUTION; EFFICIENCY; NONLINEAR PROBLEMS; POLYNOMIALS; PROBABILITY; PROBABILITY DENSITY FUNCTIONS; QUADRATURES; STATISTICAL DATA; STOCHASTIC PROCESSES

Citation Formats

Ahlfeld, R., E-mail: r.ahlfeld14@imperial.ac.uk, Belkouchi, B., and Montomoli, F.. SAMBA: Sparse Approximation of Moment-Based Arbitrary Polynomial Chaos. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1016/J.JCP.2016.05.014.
Ahlfeld, R., E-mail: r.ahlfeld14@imperial.ac.uk, Belkouchi, B., & Montomoli, F.. SAMBA: Sparse Approximation of Moment-Based Arbitrary Polynomial Chaos. United States. doi:10.1016/J.JCP.2016.05.014.
Ahlfeld, R., E-mail: r.ahlfeld14@imperial.ac.uk, Belkouchi, B., and Montomoli, F.. 2016. "SAMBA: Sparse Approximation of Moment-Based Arbitrary Polynomial Chaos". United States. doi:10.1016/J.JCP.2016.05.014.
@article{osti_22572343,
title = {SAMBA: Sparse Approximation of Moment-Based Arbitrary Polynomial Chaos},
author = {Ahlfeld, R., E-mail: r.ahlfeld14@imperial.ac.uk and Belkouchi, B. and Montomoli, F.},
abstractNote = {A new arbitrary Polynomial Chaos (aPC) method is presented for moderately high-dimensional problems characterised by limited input data availability. The proposed methodology improves the algorithm of aPC and extends the method, that was previously only introduced as tensor product expansion, to moderately high-dimensional stochastic problems. The fundamental idea of aPC is to use the statistical moments of the input random variables to develop the polynomial chaos expansion. This approach provides the possibility to propagate continuous or discrete probability density functions and also histograms (data sets) as long as their moments exist, are finite and the determinant of the moment matrix is strictly positive. For cases with limited data availability, this approach avoids bias and fitting errors caused by wrong assumptions. In this work, an alternative way to calculate the aPC is suggested, which provides the optimal polynomials, Gaussian quadrature collocation points and weights from the moments using only a handful of matrix operations on the Hankel matrix of moments. It can therefore be implemented without requiring prior knowledge about statistical data analysis or a detailed understanding of the mathematics of polynomial chaos expansions. The extension to more input variables suggested in this work, is an anisotropic and adaptive version of Smolyak's algorithm that is solely based on the moments of the input probability distributions. It is referred to as SAMBA (PC), which is short for Sparse Approximation of Moment-Based Arbitrary Polynomial Chaos. It is illustrated that for moderately high-dimensional problems (up to 20 different input variables or histograms) SAMBA can significantly simplify the calculation of sparse Gaussian quadrature rules. SAMBA's efficiency for multivariate functions with regard to data availability is further demonstrated by analysing higher order convergence and accuracy for a set of nonlinear test functions with 2, 5 and 10 different input distributions or histograms.},
doi = {10.1016/J.JCP.2016.05.014},
journal = {Journal of Computational Physics},
number = ,
volume = 320,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}
  • Generalized polynomial chaos (gPC) expansions allow the representation of the solution of a stochastic system as a series of polynomial terms. The number of gPC terms increases dramatically with the dimension of the random input variables. When the number of the gPC terms is larger than that of the available samples, a scenario that often occurs if the evaluations of the system are expensive, the evaluation of the gPC expansion can be inaccurate due to over-fitting. We propose a fully Bayesian approach that allows for global recovery of the stochastic solution, both in spacial and random domains, by coupling Bayesianmore » model uncertainty and regularization regression methods. It allows the evaluation of the PC coefficients on a grid of spacial points via (1) Bayesian model average or (2) medial probability model, and their construction as functions on the spacial domain via spline interpolation. The former accounts the model uncertainty and provides Bayes-optimal predictions; while the latter, additionally, provides a sparse representation of the solution by evaluating the expansion on a subset of dominating gPC bases when represented as a gPC expansion. Moreover, the method quantifies the importance of the gPC bases through inclusion probabilities. We design an MCMC sampler that evaluates all the unknown quantities without the need of ad-hoc techniques. The proposed method is suitable for, but not restricted to, problems whose stochastic solution is sparse at the stochastic level with respect to the gPC bases while the deterministic solver involved is expensive. We demonstrate the good performance of the proposed method and make comparisons with others on 1D, 14D and 40D in random space elliptic stochastic partial differential equations.« less
  • We propose an algorithm for recovering sparse orthogonal polynomial expansions via collocation. A standard sampling approach for recovering sparse polynomials uses Monte Carlo sampling, from the density of orthogonality, which results in poor function recovery when the polynomial degree is high. Our proposed approach aims to mitigate this limitation by sampling with respect to the weighted equilibrium measure of the parametric domain and subsequently solves a preconditionedmore » $$\ell^1$$-minimization problem, where the weights of the diagonal preconditioning matrix are given by evaluations of the Christoffel function. Our algorithm can be applied to a wide class of orthogonal polynomial families on bounded and unbounded domains, including all classical families. We present theoretical analysis to motivate the algorithm and numerical results that show our method is superior to standard Monte Carlo methods in many situations of interest. In conclusion, numerical examples are also provided to demonstrate that our proposed algorithm leads to comparable or improved accuracy even when compared with Legendre- and Hermite-specific algorithms.« less
  • Generalized polynomial chaos (gPC) expansions allow us to represent the solution of a stochastic system using a series of polynomial chaos basis functions. The number of gPC terms increases dramatically as the dimension of the random input variables increases. When the number of the gPC terms is larger than that of the available samples, a scenario that often occurs when the corresponding deterministic solver is computationally expensive, evaluation of the gPC expansion can be inaccurate due to over-fitting. We propose a fully Bayesian approach that allows for global recovery of the stochastic solutions, in both spatial and random domains, bymore » coupling Bayesian model uncertainty and regularization regression methods. It allows the evaluation of the PC coefficients on a grid of spatial points, via (1) the Bayesian model average (BMA) or (2) the median probability model, and their construction as spatial functions on the spatial domain via spline interpolation. The former accounts for the model uncertainty and provides Bayes-optimal predictions; while the latter provides a sparse representation of the stochastic solutions by evaluating the expansion on a subset of dominating gPC bases. Moreover, the proposed methods quantify the importance of the gPC bases in the probabilistic sense through inclusion probabilities. We design a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampler that evaluates all the unknown quantities without the need of ad-hoc techniques. The proposed methods are suitable for, but not restricted to, problems whose stochastic solutions are sparse in the stochastic space with respect to the gPC bases while the deterministic solver involved is expensive. We demonstrate the accuracy and performance of the proposed methods and make comparisons with other approaches on solving elliptic SPDEs with 1-, 14- and 40-random dimensions.« less
  • Polynomial chaos (PC) expansions are used in stochastic finite element analysis to represent the random model response by a set of coefficients in a suitable (so-called polynomial chaos) basis. The number of terms to be computed grows dramatically with the size of the input random vector, which makes the computational cost of classical solution schemes (may it be intrusive (i.e. of Galerkin type) or non intrusive) unaffordable when the deterministic finite element model is expensive to evaluate. To address such problems, the paper describes a non intrusive method that builds a sparse PC expansion. First, an original strategy for truncatingmore » the PC expansions, based on hyperbolic index sets, is proposed. Then an adaptive algorithm based on least angle regression (LAR) is devised for automatically detecting the significant coefficients of the PC expansion. Beside the sparsity of the basis, the experimental design used at each step of the algorithm is systematically complemented in order to avoid the overfitting phenomenon. The accuracy of the PC metamodel is checked using an estimate inspired by statistical learning theory, namely the corrected leave-one-out error. As a consequence, a rather small number of PC terms are eventually retained (sparse representation), which may be obtained at a reduced computational cost compared to the classical 'full' PC approximation. The convergence of the algorithm is shown on an analytical function. Then the method is illustrated on three stochastic finite element problems. The first model features 10 input random variables, whereas the two others involve an input random field, which is discretized into 38 and 30 - 500 random variables, respectively.« less
  • The growing need for uncertainty analysis of complex computational models has led to an expanding use of meta-models across engineering and sciences. The efficiency of meta-modeling techniques relies on their ability to provide statistically-equivalent analytical representations based on relatively few evaluations of the original model. Polynomial chaos expansions (PCE) have proven a powerful tool for developing meta-models in a wide range of applications; the key idea thereof is to expand the model response onto a basis made of multivariate polynomials obtained as tensor products of appropriate univariate polynomials. The classical PCE approach nevertheless faces the “curse of dimensionality”, namely themore » exponential increase of the basis size with increasing input dimension. To address this limitation, the sparse PCE technique has been proposed, in which the expansion is carried out on only a few relevant basis terms that are automatically selected by a suitable algorithm. An alternative for developing meta-models with polynomial functions in high-dimensional problems is offered by the newly emerged low-rank approximations (LRA) approach. By exploiting the tensor–product structure of the multivariate basis, LRA can provide polynomial representations in highly compressed formats. Through extensive numerical investigations, we herein first shed light on issues relating to the construction of canonical LRA with a particular greedy algorithm involving a sequential updating of the polynomial coefficients along separate dimensions. Specifically, we examine the selection of optimal rank, stopping criteria in the updating of the polynomial coefficients and error estimation. In the sequel, we confront canonical LRA to sparse PCE in structural-mechanics and heat-conduction applications based on finite-element solutions. Canonical LRA exhibit smaller errors than sparse PCE in cases when the number of available model evaluations is small with respect to the input dimension, a situation that is often encountered in real-life problems. By introducing the conditional generalization error, we further demonstrate that canonical LRA tend to outperform sparse PCE in the prediction of extreme model responses, which is critical in reliability analysis.« less