skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: SU-E-T-673: Recent Developments and Comprehensive Validations of a GPU-Based Proton Monte Carlo Simulation Package, GPMC

Abstract

Purpose: A GPU-based Monte Carlo (MC) simulation package gPMC has been previously developed and high computational efficiency was achieved. This abstract reports our recent improvements on this package in terms of accuracy, functionality, and code portability. Methods: In the latest version of gPMC, nuclear interaction cross section database was updated to include data from TOPAS/Geant4. Inelastic interaction model, particularly the proton scattering angle distribution, was updated to improve overall simulation accuracy. Calculation of dose averaged LET (LETd) was implemented. gPMC was ported onto an OpenCL environment to enable portability across different computing devices (GPUs from different vendors and CPUs). We also performed comprehensive tests of the code accuracy. Dose from electro-magnetic (EM) interaction channel, primary and secondary proton doses and fluences were scored and compared with those computed by TOPAS. Results: In a homogeneous water phantom with 100 and 200 MeV beams, mean dose differences in EM channel computed by gPMC and by TOPAS were 0.28% and 0.65% of the corresponding maximum dose, respectively. With the Geant4 nuclear interaction cross section data, mean difference of primary proton dose was 0.84% for the 200 MeV case and 0.78% for the 100 MeV case. After updating inelastic interaction model, maximum difference ofmore » secondary proton fluence and dose were 0.08% and 0.5% for the 200 MeV beam, and 0.04% and 0.2% for the 100 MeV beam. In a test case with a 150MeV proton beam, the mean difference between LETd computed by gPMC and TOPAS was 0.96% within the proton range. With the OpenCL implementation, gPMC is executable on AMD and Nvidia GPUs, as well as on Intel CPU in single or multiple threads. Results on different platforms agreed within statistical uncertainty. Conclusion: Several improvements have been implemented in the latest version of gPMC, which enhanced its accuracy, functionality, and code portability.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1]; ; ;  [2]
  1. UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)
  2. Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22538181
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 42; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2015 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; ACCURACY; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; CROSS SECTIONS; IMPLEMENTATION; INTERACTIONS; LET; MEV RANGE 100-1000; MEV RANGE 10-100; MONTE CARLO METHOD; PROTON BEAMS; RADIATION DOSES

Citation Formats

Qin, N, Tian, Z, Pompos, A, Jiang, S, Jia, X, Giantsoudi, D, Schuemann, J, and Paganetti, H. SU-E-T-673: Recent Developments and Comprehensive Validations of a GPU-Based Proton Monte Carlo Simulation Package, GPMC. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4925036.
Qin, N, Tian, Z, Pompos, A, Jiang, S, Jia, X, Giantsoudi, D, Schuemann, J, & Paganetti, H. SU-E-T-673: Recent Developments and Comprehensive Validations of a GPU-Based Proton Monte Carlo Simulation Package, GPMC. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4925036.
Qin, N, Tian, Z, Pompos, A, Jiang, S, Jia, X, Giantsoudi, D, Schuemann, J, and Paganetti, H. Mon . "SU-E-T-673: Recent Developments and Comprehensive Validations of a GPU-Based Proton Monte Carlo Simulation Package, GPMC". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4925036.
@article{osti_22538181,
title = {SU-E-T-673: Recent Developments and Comprehensive Validations of a GPU-Based Proton Monte Carlo Simulation Package, GPMC},
author = {Qin, N and Tian, Z and Pompos, A and Jiang, S and Jia, X and Giantsoudi, D and Schuemann, J and Paganetti, H},
abstractNote = {Purpose: A GPU-based Monte Carlo (MC) simulation package gPMC has been previously developed and high computational efficiency was achieved. This abstract reports our recent improvements on this package in terms of accuracy, functionality, and code portability. Methods: In the latest version of gPMC, nuclear interaction cross section database was updated to include data from TOPAS/Geant4. Inelastic interaction model, particularly the proton scattering angle distribution, was updated to improve overall simulation accuracy. Calculation of dose averaged LET (LETd) was implemented. gPMC was ported onto an OpenCL environment to enable portability across different computing devices (GPUs from different vendors and CPUs). We also performed comprehensive tests of the code accuracy. Dose from electro-magnetic (EM) interaction channel, primary and secondary proton doses and fluences were scored and compared with those computed by TOPAS. Results: In a homogeneous water phantom with 100 and 200 MeV beams, mean dose differences in EM channel computed by gPMC and by TOPAS were 0.28% and 0.65% of the corresponding maximum dose, respectively. With the Geant4 nuclear interaction cross section data, mean difference of primary proton dose was 0.84% for the 200 MeV case and 0.78% for the 100 MeV case. After updating inelastic interaction model, maximum difference of secondary proton fluence and dose were 0.08% and 0.5% for the 200 MeV beam, and 0.04% and 0.2% for the 100 MeV beam. In a test case with a 150MeV proton beam, the mean difference between LETd computed by gPMC and TOPAS was 0.96% within the proton range. With the OpenCL implementation, gPMC is executable on AMD and Nvidia GPUs, as well as on Intel CPU in single or multiple threads. Results on different platforms agreed within statistical uncertainty. Conclusion: Several improvements have been implemented in the latest version of gPMC, which enhanced its accuracy, functionality, and code portability.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4925036},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 42,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015},
month = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015}
}
  • Purpose: Acuros BV has become available to perform accurate dose calculations in high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy with phantom heterogeneity considered by solving the Boltzmann transport equation. In this work, we performed validation studies regarding the dose calculation accuracy of Acuros BV in cases with a shielded cylinder applicator using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Methods: Fifteen cases were considered in our studies, covering five different diameters of the applicator and three different shielding degrees. For each case, a digital phantom was created in Varian BrachyVision with the cylinder applicator inserted in the middle of a large water phantom. A treatment plan withmore » eight dwell positions was generated for these fifteen cases. Dose calculations were performed with Acuros BV. We then generated a voxelized phantom of the same geometry, and the materials were modeled according to the vendor’s specifications. MC dose calculations were then performed using our in-house developed fast MC dose engine for HDR brachytherapy (gBMC) on a GPU platform, which is able to simulate both photon transport and electron transport in a voxelized geometry. A phase-space file for the Ir-192 HDR source was used as a source model for MC simulations. Results: Satisfactory agreements between the dose distributions calculated by Acuros BV and those calculated by gBMC were observed in all cases. Quantitatively, we computed point-wise dose difference within the region that receives a dose higher than 10% of the reference dose, defined to be the dose at 5mm outward away from the applicator surface. The mean dose difference was ∼0.45%–0.51% and the 95-percentile maximum difference was ∼1.24%–1.47%. Conclusion: Acuros BV is able to accurately perform dose calculations in HDR brachytherapy with a shielded cylinder applicator.« less
  • Purpose: In proton dose calculation, clinically compatible speeds are now achieved with Monte Carlo codes (MC) that combine 1) adequate simplifications in the physics of transport and 2) the use of hardware architectures enabling massive parallel computing (like GPUs). However, the uncertainties related to the transport algorithms used in these codes must be kept minimal. Such algorithms can be checked with the so-called “Fano cavity test”. We implemented the test in two codes that run on specific hardware: gPMC on an nVidia GPU and MCsquare on an Intel Xeon Phi (60 cores). Methods: gPMC and MCsquare are designed for transportingmore » protons in CT geometries. Both codes use the method of fictitious interaction to sample the step-length for each transport step. The considered geometry is a water cavity (2×2×0.2 cm{sup 3}, 0.001 g/cm{sup 3}) in a 10×10×50 cm{sup 3} water phantom (1 g/cm{sup 3}). CPE in the cavity is established by generating protons over the phantom volume with a uniform momentum (energy E) and a uniform intensity per unit mass I. Assuming no nuclear reactions and no generation of other secondaries, the computed cavity dose should equal IE, according to Fano's theorem. Both codes were tested for initial proton energies of 50, 100, and 200 MeV. Results: For all energies, gPMC and MCsquare are within 0.3 and 0.2 % of the theoretical value IE, respectively (0.1% standard deviation). Single-precision computations (instead of double) increased the error by about 0.1% in MCsquare. Conclusion: Despite the simplifications in the physics of transport, both gPMC and MCsquare successfully pass the Fano test. This ensures optimal accuracy of the codes for clinical applications within the uncertainties on the underlying physical models. It also opens the path to other applications of these codes, like the simulation of ion chamber response.« less
  • Purpose: Monte Carlo codes are becoming important tools for proton beam dosimetry. However, the relationships between the customizing parameters and percentage depth dose (PDD) of GATE and PHITS codes have not been reported which are studied for PDD and proton range compared to the FLUKA code and the experimental data. Methods: The beam delivery system of the Indiana University Health Proton Therapy Center was modeled for the uniform scanning beam in FLUKA and transferred identically into GATE and PHITS. This computational model was built from the blue print and validated with the commissioning data. Three parameters evaluated are the maximummore » step size, cut off energy and physical and transport model. The dependence of the PDDs on the customizing parameters was compared with the published results of previous studies. Results: The optimal parameters for the simulation of the whole beam delivery system were defined by referring to the calculation results obtained with each parameter. Although the PDDs from FLUKA and the experimental data show a good agreement, those of GATE and PHITS obtained with our optimal parameters show a minor discrepancy. The measured proton range R90 was 269.37 mm, compared to the calculated range of 269.63 mm, 268.96 mm, and 270.85 mm with FLUKA, GATE and PHITS, respectively. Conclusion: We evaluated the dependence of the results for PDDs obtained with GATE and PHITS Monte Carlo generalpurpose codes on the customizing parameters by using the whole computational model of the treatment nozzle. The optimal parameters for the simulation were then defined by referring to the calculation results. The physical model, particle transport mechanics and the different geometrybased descriptions need accurate customization in three simulation codes to agree with experimental data for artifact-free Monte Carlo simulation. This study was supported by Grants-in Aid for Cancer Research (H22-3rd Term Cancer Control-General-043) from the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare of Japan, Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research (No. 23791419), and JSPS Core-to-Core program (No. 23003). The authors have no conflict of interest.« less
  • Purpose: To construct a dose monitoring system based on an endorectal balloon coupled to thin scintillating fibers to study the dose delivered to the rectum during prostate cancer proton therapy Methods: The Geant4 Monte Carlo toolkit version 9.6p02 was used to simulate prostate cancer proton therapy treatments of an endorectal balloon (for immobilization of a 2.9 cm diameter prostate gland) and a set of 34 scintillating fibers symmetrically placed around the balloon and perpendicular to the proton beam direction (for dosimetry measurements) Results: A linear response of the fibers to the dose delivered was observed within <2%, a property thatmore » makes them good candidates for real time dosimetry. Results obtained show that the closest fiber recorded about 1/3 of the dose to the target with a 1/r{sup 2} decrease in the dose distribution as one goes toward the frontal and distal top fibers. Very low dose was recorded by the bottom fibers (about 45 times comparatively), which is a clear indication that the overall volume of the rectal wall that is exposed to a higher dose is relatively minimized. Further analysis indicated a simple scaling relationship between the dose to the prostate and the dose to the top fibers (a linear fit gave a slope of −0.07±0.07 MeV per treatment Gy) Conclusion: Thin (1 mm × 1 mm × 100 cm) long scintillating fibers were found to be ideal for real time in-vivo dose measurement to the rectum for prostate cancer proton therapy. The linear response of the fibers to the dose delivered makes them good candidates of dosimeters. With thorough calibration and the ability to define a good correlation between the dose to the target and the dose to the fibers, such dosimeters can be used for real time dose verification to the target.« less
  • Purpose: To enable an existing web application for GPU-based Monte Carlo (MC) 3D dosimetry quality assurance (QA) to compute “delivered dose” from linac logfile data. Methods: We added significant features to an IMRT/VMAT QA web application which is based on existing technologies (HTML5, Python, and Django). This tool interfaces with python, c-code libraries, and command line-based GPU applications to perform a MC-based IMRT/VMAT QA. The web app automates many complicated aspects of interfacing clinical DICOM and logfile data with cutting-edge GPU software to run a MC dose calculation. The resultant web app is powerful, easy to use, and is ablemore » to re-compute both plan dose (from DICOM data) and delivered dose (from logfile data). Both dynalog and trajectorylog file formats are supported. Users upload zipped DICOM RP, CT, and RD data and set the expected statistic uncertainty for the MC dose calculation. A 3D gamma index map, 3D dose distribution, gamma histogram, dosimetric statistics, and DVH curves are displayed to the user. Additional the user may upload the delivery logfile data from the linac to compute a 'delivered dose' calculation and corresponding gamma tests. A comprehensive PDF QA report summarizing the results can also be downloaded. Results: We successfully improved a web app for a GPU-based QA tool that consists of logfile parcing, fluence map generation, CT image processing, GPU based MC dose calculation, gamma index calculation, and DVH calculation. The result is an IMRT and VMAT QA tool that conducts an independent dose calculation for a given treatment plan and delivery log file. The system takes both DICOM data and logfile data to compute plan dose and delivered dose respectively. Conclusion: We sucessfully improved a GPU-based MC QA tool to allow for logfile dose calculation. The high efficiency and accessibility will greatly facilitate IMRT and VMAT QA.« less