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Title: Using iron line reverberation and spectroscopy to distinguish Kerr and non-Kerr black holes

Abstract

The iron Kα line commonly observed in the X-ray spectrum of both stellar-mass and supermassive black hole candidates is produced by the illumination of a cold accretion disk by a hot corona. In this framework, the activation of a new flaring region in the hot corona imprints a time variation on the iron line spectrum. Future X-ray facilities with high time resolution and large effective areas may be able to measure the so-called 2-dimensional transfer function; that is, the iron line profile detected by a distant observer as a function of time in response to an instantaneous flare from the X-ray primary source. This work is a preliminary study to determine if and how such a technique can provide more information about the spacetime geometry around the compact object than the already possible measurements of the time-integrated iron line profile. Within our simplified model, we find that a measurement of iron line reverberation can improve constraints appreciably given a sufficiently strong signal, though that most of the information is present in the time-integrated spectrum. Our aim is to test the Kerr metric. We find that current X-ray facilities and data are unable to provide strong tests of the Kerr naturemore » of supermassive black hole candidates. We consider an optimistic case of 10{sup 5} iron line photons from a next-generation data set. With such data, the reverberation model improves upon the spectral constraint by an order of magnitude.« less

Authors:
;  [1];  [2]
  1. Center for Field Theory and Particle Physics and Department of Physics, Fudan University, 220 Handan Road, 200433 Shanghai (China)
  2. Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22525836
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics; Journal Volume: 2015; Journal Issue: 05; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; ACCRETION DISKS; BLACK HOLES; ILLUMINANCE; IRON; KERR METRIC; LIMITING VALUES; MASS; PHOTONS; SPACE-TIME; STELLAR CORONAE; STELLAR FLARES; TIME DEPENDENCE; TIME RESOLUTION; TRANSFER FUNCTIONS; TWO-DIMENSIONAL SYSTEMS; X RADIATION; X-RAY SPECTRA

Citation Formats

Jiang, Jiachen, Bambi, Cosimo, and Steiner, James F., E-mail: jcjiang12@fudan.edu.cn, E-mail: bambi@fudan.edu.cn, E-mail: jsteiner@cfa.harvard.edu. Using iron line reverberation and spectroscopy to distinguish Kerr and non-Kerr black holes. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1088/1475-7516/2015/05/025.
Jiang, Jiachen, Bambi, Cosimo, & Steiner, James F., E-mail: jcjiang12@fudan.edu.cn, E-mail: bambi@fudan.edu.cn, E-mail: jsteiner@cfa.harvard.edu. Using iron line reverberation and spectroscopy to distinguish Kerr and non-Kerr black holes. United States. doi:10.1088/1475-7516/2015/05/025.
Jiang, Jiachen, Bambi, Cosimo, and Steiner, James F., E-mail: jcjiang12@fudan.edu.cn, E-mail: bambi@fudan.edu.cn, E-mail: jsteiner@cfa.harvard.edu. 2015. "Using iron line reverberation and spectroscopy to distinguish Kerr and non-Kerr black holes". United States. doi:10.1088/1475-7516/2015/05/025.
@article{osti_22525836,
title = {Using iron line reverberation and spectroscopy to distinguish Kerr and non-Kerr black holes},
author = {Jiang, Jiachen and Bambi, Cosimo and Steiner, James F., E-mail: jcjiang12@fudan.edu.cn, E-mail: bambi@fudan.edu.cn, E-mail: jsteiner@cfa.harvard.edu},
abstractNote = {The iron Kα line commonly observed in the X-ray spectrum of both stellar-mass and supermassive black hole candidates is produced by the illumination of a cold accretion disk by a hot corona. In this framework, the activation of a new flaring region in the hot corona imprints a time variation on the iron line spectrum. Future X-ray facilities with high time resolution and large effective areas may be able to measure the so-called 2-dimensional transfer function; that is, the iron line profile detected by a distant observer as a function of time in response to an instantaneous flare from the X-ray primary source. This work is a preliminary study to determine if and how such a technique can provide more information about the spacetime geometry around the compact object than the already possible measurements of the time-integrated iron line profile. Within our simplified model, we find that a measurement of iron line reverberation can improve constraints appreciably given a sufficiently strong signal, though that most of the information is present in the time-integrated spectrum. Our aim is to test the Kerr metric. We find that current X-ray facilities and data are unable to provide strong tests of the Kerr nature of supermassive black hole candidates. We consider an optimistic case of 10{sup 5} iron line photons from a next-generation data set. With such data, the reverberation model improves upon the spectral constraint by an order of magnitude.},
doi = {10.1088/1475-7516/2015/05/025},
journal = {Journal of Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics},
number = 05,
volume = 2015,
place = {United States},
year = 2015,
month = 5
}
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