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Title: Revisited reaction-diffusion model of thermal desorption spectroscopy experiments on hydrogen retention in material

Abstract

Desorption phase of thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) experiments performed on tungsten samples exposed to flux of hydrogen isotopes in fusion relevant conditions is analyzed using a reaction-diffusion model describing hydrogen retention in material bulk. Two regimes of hydrogen desorption are identified depending on whether hydrogen trapping rate is faster than hydrogen diffusion rate in material during TDS experiments. In both regimes, a majority of hydrogen released from material defects is immediately outgassed instead of diffusing deeply in material bulk when the evolution of hydrogen concentration in material is quasi-static, which is the case during TDS experiments performed with tungsten samples exposed to flux of hydrogen isotopes in fusion related conditions. In this context, analytical expressions of the hydrogen outgassing flux as a function of the material temperature are obtained with sufficient accuracy to describe main features of thermal desorption spectra (TDSP). These expressions are then used to highlight how characteristic temperatures of TDSP depend on hydrogen retention parameters, such as trap concentration or activation energy of detrapping processes. The use of Arrhenius plots to characterize retention processes is then revisited when hydrogen trapping takes place during TDS experiments. Retention processes are also characterized using the shape of desorption peaks inmore » TDSP, and it is shown that diffusion of hydrogen in material during TDS experiment can induce long desorption tails visible aside desorption peaks at high temperature in TDSP. These desorption tails can be used to estimate activation energy of diffusion of hydrogen in material.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22494637
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Applied Physics; Journal Volume: 118; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: (c) 2015 AIP Publishing LLC; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; ACTIVATION ENERGY; DEGASSING; DESORPTION; DIFFUSION; HYDROGEN; HYDROGEN ISOTOPES; RETENTION; SPECTROSCOPY; TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE; THERMONUCLEAR REACTIONS; TRAPPING; TUNGSTEN

Citation Formats

Guterl, Jerome, E-mail: jguterl@ucsd.edu, Smirnov, R. D., and Krasheninnikov, S. I. Revisited reaction-diffusion model of thermal desorption spectroscopy experiments on hydrogen retention in material. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4926546.
Guterl, Jerome, E-mail: jguterl@ucsd.edu, Smirnov, R. D., & Krasheninnikov, S. I. Revisited reaction-diffusion model of thermal desorption spectroscopy experiments on hydrogen retention in material. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4926546.
Guterl, Jerome, E-mail: jguterl@ucsd.edu, Smirnov, R. D., and Krasheninnikov, S. I. Tue . "Revisited reaction-diffusion model of thermal desorption spectroscopy experiments on hydrogen retention in material". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4926546.
@article{osti_22494637,
title = {Revisited reaction-diffusion model of thermal desorption spectroscopy experiments on hydrogen retention in material},
author = {Guterl, Jerome, E-mail: jguterl@ucsd.edu and Smirnov, R. D. and Krasheninnikov, S. I.},
abstractNote = {Desorption phase of thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) experiments performed on tungsten samples exposed to flux of hydrogen isotopes in fusion relevant conditions is analyzed using a reaction-diffusion model describing hydrogen retention in material bulk. Two regimes of hydrogen desorption are identified depending on whether hydrogen trapping rate is faster than hydrogen diffusion rate in material during TDS experiments. In both regimes, a majority of hydrogen released from material defects is immediately outgassed instead of diffusing deeply in material bulk when the evolution of hydrogen concentration in material is quasi-static, which is the case during TDS experiments performed with tungsten samples exposed to flux of hydrogen isotopes in fusion related conditions. In this context, analytical expressions of the hydrogen outgassing flux as a function of the material temperature are obtained with sufficient accuracy to describe main features of thermal desorption spectra (TDSP). These expressions are then used to highlight how characteristic temperatures of TDSP depend on hydrogen retention parameters, such as trap concentration or activation energy of detrapping processes. The use of Arrhenius plots to characterize retention processes is then revisited when hydrogen trapping takes place during TDS experiments. Retention processes are also characterized using the shape of desorption peaks in TDSP, and it is shown that diffusion of hydrogen in material during TDS experiment can induce long desorption tails visible aside desorption peaks at high temperature in TDSP. These desorption tails can be used to estimate activation energy of diffusion of hydrogen in material.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4926546},
journal = {Journal of Applied Physics},
number = 4,
volume = 118,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Jul 28 00:00:00 EDT 2015},
month = {Tue Jul 28 00:00:00 EDT 2015}
}
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