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Title: Radon assay for SNO+

Abstract

The SNO+ experiment will study neutrinos while located 6,800 feet below the surface of the earth at SNOLAB. Though shielded from surface backgrounds, emanation of radon radioisotopes from the surrounding rock leads to back-grounds. The characteristic decay of radon and its daughters allows for an alpha detection technique to count the amount of Rn-222 atoms collected. Traps can collect Rn-222 from various positions and materials, including an assay skid that will collect Rn-222 from the organic liquid scintillator used to detect interactions within SNO+.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Laurentian University, Greater Sudbury, Ontario (Canada)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22494412
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 1697; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: 5. IUPAP international conference on women in physics, Waterloo (Canada), 5-8 Aug 2014; Other Information: (c) 2015 AIP Publishing LLC; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; 71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; ALPHA DETECTION; DECAY; LIQUID SCINTILLATION DETECTORS; LIQUID SCINTILLATORS; NEUTRINOS; RADON; RADON 222; SURFACES

Citation Formats

Rumleskie, Janet. Radon assay for SNO+. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4937697.
Rumleskie, Janet. Radon assay for SNO+. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4937697.
Rumleskie, Janet. 2015. "Radon assay for SNO+". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4937697.
@article{osti_22494412,
title = {Radon assay for SNO+},
author = {Rumleskie, Janet},
abstractNote = {The SNO+ experiment will study neutrinos while located 6,800 feet below the surface of the earth at SNOLAB. Though shielded from surface backgrounds, emanation of radon radioisotopes from the surrounding rock leads to back-grounds. The characteristic decay of radon and its daughters allows for an alpha detection technique to count the amount of Rn-222 atoms collected. Traps can collect Rn-222 from various positions and materials, including an assay skid that will collect Rn-222 from the organic liquid scintillator used to detect interactions within SNO+.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4937697},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 1697,
place = {United States},
year = 2015,
month =
}
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