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Title: Experimental investigation on the energy deposition and expansion rate under the electrical explosion of aluminum wire in vacuum

Abstract

Experimental investigations on the electrical explosion of aluminum wire using negative polarity current in vacuum are presented. Current pulses with rise rates of 40 A/ns, 80 A/ns, and 120 A/ns are generated for investigating the influence of current rise rate on energy deposition. Experimental results show a significant increase of energy deposition into the wire before the voltage breakdown with the increase of current rise rate. The influence of wire dimension on energy deposition is investigated as well. Decreasing the wire length allows more energy to be deposited into the wire. The energy deposition of a 0.5 cm-long wire explosion is ∼2.5 times higher than the energy deposition of a 2 cm-long wire explosion. The dependence of the energy deposition on wire diameter demonstrates a maximum energy deposition of 2.7 eV/atom with a diameter of ∼18 μm. Substantial increase in energy deposition is observed in the electrical explosion of aluminum wire with polyimide coating. A laser probe is applied to construct the shadowgraphy, schlieren, and interferometry diagnostics. The morphology and expansion trajectory of exploding products are analyzed based on the shadowgram. The interference phase shift is reconstructed from the interferogram. Parallel dual wires are exploded to estimate the expansion velocity of the plasma shell.

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049 (China)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22493085
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Applied Physics; Journal Volume: 118; Journal Issue: 24; Other Information: (c) 2015 AIP Publishing LLC; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; ALUMINIUM; ELECTRIC POTENTIAL; ELECTRICAL FAULTS; ENERGY ABSORPTION; ENERGY LOSSES; EV RANGE; INTERFERENCE; INTERFEROMETRY; LASERS; MORPHOLOGY; PHASE SHIFT; PLASMA; PULSES; WIRES

Citation Formats

Shi, Zongqian, Wang, Kun, Shi, Yuanjie, Wu, Jian, and Han, Ruoyu. Experimental investigation on the energy deposition and expansion rate under the electrical explosion of aluminum wire in vacuum. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4938492.
Shi, Zongqian, Wang, Kun, Shi, Yuanjie, Wu, Jian, & Han, Ruoyu. Experimental investigation on the energy deposition and expansion rate under the electrical explosion of aluminum wire in vacuum. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4938492.
Shi, Zongqian, Wang, Kun, Shi, Yuanjie, Wu, Jian, and Han, Ruoyu. 2015. "Experimental investigation on the energy deposition and expansion rate under the electrical explosion of aluminum wire in vacuum". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4938492.
@article{osti_22493085,
title = {Experimental investigation on the energy deposition and expansion rate under the electrical explosion of aluminum wire in vacuum},
author = {Shi, Zongqian and Wang, Kun and Shi, Yuanjie and Wu, Jian and Han, Ruoyu},
abstractNote = {Experimental investigations on the electrical explosion of aluminum wire using negative polarity current in vacuum are presented. Current pulses with rise rates of 40 A/ns, 80 A/ns, and 120 A/ns are generated for investigating the influence of current rise rate on energy deposition. Experimental results show a significant increase of energy deposition into the wire before the voltage breakdown with the increase of current rise rate. The influence of wire dimension on energy deposition is investigated as well. Decreasing the wire length allows more energy to be deposited into the wire. The energy deposition of a 0.5 cm-long wire explosion is ∼2.5 times higher than the energy deposition of a 2 cm-long wire explosion. The dependence of the energy deposition on wire diameter demonstrates a maximum energy deposition of 2.7 eV/atom with a diameter of ∼18 μm. Substantial increase in energy deposition is observed in the electrical explosion of aluminum wire with polyimide coating. A laser probe is applied to construct the shadowgraphy, schlieren, and interferometry diagnostics. The morphology and expansion trajectory of exploding products are analyzed based on the shadowgram. The interference phase shift is reconstructed from the interferogram. Parallel dual wires are exploded to estimate the expansion velocity of the plasma shell.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4938492},
journal = {Journal of Applied Physics},
number = 24,
volume = 118,
place = {United States},
year = 2015,
month =
}
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