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Title: Welding of titanium and nickel alloy by combination of explosive welding and spark plasma sintering technologies

Abstract

A possibility of titanium and nickel-based alloys composite materials formation using combination of explosive welding and spark plasma sintering technologies was demonstrated in the current research. An employment of interlayer consisting of copper and tantalum thin plates makes possible to eliminate a contact between metallurgical incompatible titanium and nickel that are susceptible to intermetallic compounds formation during their interaction. By the following spark plasma sintering process the bonding has been received between titanium and titanium alloy VT20 through the thin powder layer of pure titanium that is distinguished by low defectiveness and fine dispersive structure.

Authors:
; ;  [1]; ;  [2]
  1. Novosibirsk State Technical University, Novosibirsk, 630073 (Russian Federation)
  2. Lavrentyev Institute of Hydrodynamics SB RAS, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22492564
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 1683; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: International conference on advanced materials with hierarchical structure for new technologies and reliable structures 2015, Tomsk (Russian Federation), 21-25 Sep 2015; Other Information: (c) 2015 AIP Publishing LLC; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; BONDING; COMPOSITE MATERIALS; COPPER; EXPLOSION WELDING; INTERACTIONS; INTERMETALLIC COMPOUNDS; LAYERS; NICKEL BASE ALLOYS; PLASMA; POWDERS; SINTERING; TANTALUM; TITANIUM BASE ALLOYS

Citation Formats

Malyutina, Yu. N., E-mail: iuliiamaliutina@gmail.com, Bataev, A. A., E-mail: bataev@adm.nstu.ru, Shevtsova, L. I., E-mail: edeliya2010@mail.ru, Mali, V. I., E-mail: vmali@mail.ru, and Anisimov, A. G., E-mail: anis@hydro.nsc.ru. Welding of titanium and nickel alloy by combination of explosive welding and spark plasma sintering technologies. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4932830.
Malyutina, Yu. N., E-mail: iuliiamaliutina@gmail.com, Bataev, A. A., E-mail: bataev@adm.nstu.ru, Shevtsova, L. I., E-mail: edeliya2010@mail.ru, Mali, V. I., E-mail: vmali@mail.ru, & Anisimov, A. G., E-mail: anis@hydro.nsc.ru. Welding of titanium and nickel alloy by combination of explosive welding and spark plasma sintering technologies. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4932830.
Malyutina, Yu. N., E-mail: iuliiamaliutina@gmail.com, Bataev, A. A., E-mail: bataev@adm.nstu.ru, Shevtsova, L. I., E-mail: edeliya2010@mail.ru, Mali, V. I., E-mail: vmali@mail.ru, and Anisimov, A. G., E-mail: anis@hydro.nsc.ru. Tue . "Welding of titanium and nickel alloy by combination of explosive welding and spark plasma sintering technologies". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4932830.
@article{osti_22492564,
title = {Welding of titanium and nickel alloy by combination of explosive welding and spark plasma sintering technologies},
author = {Malyutina, Yu. N., E-mail: iuliiamaliutina@gmail.com and Bataev, A. A., E-mail: bataev@adm.nstu.ru and Shevtsova, L. I., E-mail: edeliya2010@mail.ru and Mali, V. I., E-mail: vmali@mail.ru and Anisimov, A. G., E-mail: anis@hydro.nsc.ru},
abstractNote = {A possibility of titanium and nickel-based alloys composite materials formation using combination of explosive welding and spark plasma sintering technologies was demonstrated in the current research. An employment of interlayer consisting of copper and tantalum thin plates makes possible to eliminate a contact between metallurgical incompatible titanium and nickel that are susceptible to intermetallic compounds formation during their interaction. By the following spark plasma sintering process the bonding has been received between titanium and titanium alloy VT20 through the thin powder layer of pure titanium that is distinguished by low defectiveness and fine dispersive structure.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4932830},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 1683,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Oct 27 00:00:00 EDT 2015},
month = {Tue Oct 27 00:00:00 EDT 2015}
}
  • Polycrystalline samples of nickel intercalated (0-5%) TiSe{sub 2} were attempted via solid-state reaction in evacuated quartz tubes followed by densification using a spark plasma sintering process. X-ray diffraction data indicated that mixed NiSe{sub 2} and TiSe{sub 2} phases were present after initial synthesis by solid-state reaction, but a pure TiSe{sub 2} phase was present after the spark plasma sintering. While EPMA data reveals the stoichiometry to be near 1:1.8 (Ti:Se) for all samples, comparisons of the measured bulk densities to the theoretical densities suggest that the off stoichiometry is a result of the co-intercalation of both Ni and Ti rathermore » than Se vacancies. Due to the presence of excess Ti (0.085-0.130 per formula) in the van der Waals gap of all the samples, the sensitive electron-hole balance is offset by the additional Ti-3d electrons, leading to an increase in the thermopower (n-type) over pristine, stoichiometric TiSe{sub 2}. The effects of the co-intercalation of both Ni and Ti in TiSe{sub 2} on the structural, thermal, and electrical properties are discussed herein. - Graphical abstract: Co-intercalation of nickel and excess titanium into the van der Waals gap of TiSe{sub 2} via solid state synthesis followed by spark plasma sintering results in a systematic shift in the ratio of hole and electron carrier concentration, which is close to unity for pristine TiSe{sub 2}. This directly affects the electrical transport properties, and as the structural disorder induced by intercalation suppresses the lattice thermal conductivity, co-intercalation is an effective route to enhance the thermoelectric properties of transition metal diselenides. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Single phase bulk Ni and Ti co-intercalated TiSe{sub 2} samples prepared by spark plasma sintering. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Density and X-ray diffraction suggest that the Ni and excess Ti are ordered in the Van der Waals gap. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co-intercalation of Ni and Ti can be used to control electron-hole ratio and structural disorder.« less
  • Coupled in situ alloying and nitridation of titanium–vanadium alloys, has been achieved by introducing reactive nitrogen gas during the spark plasma sintering (SPS) of blended titanium and vanadium elemental powders, leading to a new class of nitride reinforced titanium alloy composites. The resulting microstructure includes precipitates of the d-TiN phase with the NaCl structure, equiaxed (or globular) precipitates of a nitrogen enriched hcp a(Ti,N) phase with a c/a ratio more than what is expected for pure hcp Ti, and fine scale plate-shaped precipitates of hcp a-Ti, distributed within a bcc b matrix. During SPS processing, the d-TiN phase appears tomore » form at a temperature of 1400 C, while only hcp a(Ti,N) and a-Ti phases form at lower processing temperatures. Consequently, the highest microhardness is exhibited by the composite processed at 1400 C while those processed at 1300 C or below exhibit lower values. Processing at temperatures below 1300 C, resulted in an incomplete alloying of the blend of titanium and vanadium powders. These d-TiN precipitates act as heterogeneous nucleation sites for the a(Ti,N) precipitates that appear to engulf and exhibit an orientation relationship with the nitride phase at the center. Furthermore, fine scale a-Ti plates are precipitated within the nitride precipitates, presumably resulting from the retrograde solubility of nitrogen in titanium.« less
  • Magnetite nanoparticles about 10 nm sized were synthesized by the polyol method. Zero-field-cooled (ZFC)-FC measurements showed a blocking temperature ∼170 K and the absence of the Verwey transition. They were subsequently consolidated by spark plasma sintering at 750 °C for 15 min, leading to a high density (92% of the theoretical density), solid body, with grains in the 150 nm range. X-ray diffraction patterns exhibited a spinel single phase with cell parameters corresponding to the magnetite structure. Magnetic measurements showed a decrease of coercivity from 685 Oe (54.5 kA/m) at 118 K to 90 Oe (7.2 kA/m) at 139 K. ZFC measurements at 25 Oe presented a three-fold magnetization increase as temperaturemore » increased; a small transition between 116 and 117.5 K, followed by a larger one from 117.6 to 124 K. The first transition can be associated with a complex crystallographic transition and delocalization of Fe{sup 2+}-Fe{sup 3+}, while the second one can be attributed to spin reorientation due to the magnetocrystalline anisotropy constant (K{sub 1}) change of sign as previously observed only in magnetite single crystals.« less
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