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Title: Radon exhalation rates from some soil samples of Kharar, Punjab

Abstract

Radon and its progeny are major contributors in the radiation dose received by general population of the world. Because radon is a noble gas, a large portion of it is free to migrate away from radium. The primary sources of radon in the houses are soils and rocks source emanations, emanation from building materials, and entry of radon into a structure from outdoor air. Keeping this in mind the study of radon exhalation rate from some soil samples of the Kharar, Punjab has been carried out using Can Technique. The equilibrium radon concentration in various soil samples of Kharar area of district Mohali varied from 12.7 Bqm{sup −3} to 82.9 Bqm{sup −3} with an average of 37.5 ± 27.0 Bqm{sup −3}. The radon mass exhalation rates from the soil samples varied from 0.45 to 2.9 mBq/kg/h with an average of 1.4 ± 0.9 mBq/kg/h and radon surface exhalation rates varied from 10.4 to 67.2 mBq/m{sup 2}/h with an average of 30.6 ± 21.8 mBq/m{sup 2}/h. The radon mass and surface exhalation rates of the soil samples of Kharar, Punjab were lower than that of the world wide average.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5]
  1. Deptt of Physics, M. M. University, Mullana (Ambala)-133 207 (India)
  2. (India)
  3. Deptt of Physics, S.A. Jain (P.G.) College, Ambala City- 134 003 (India)
  4. Deptt of Physics, National Institute of Technology, Kurukshetra- 136 119 (India)
  5. Deptt of Physics, Punjabi University, Patiala- 147 001 (India)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22488889
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 1675; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: AMRP-2015: 4. national conference on advanced materials and radiation physics, Longowal (India), 13-14 Mar 2015; Other Information: (c) 2015 AIP Publishing LLC; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; ABUNDANCE; AIR; BUILDING MATERIALS; CONCENTRATION RATIO; ECOLOGICAL CONCENTRATION; EQUILIBRIUM; EXHALATION; GLOBAL ASPECTS; HOUSES; MASS; PROGENY; RADIATION DOSES; RADIUM; RADON; ROCKS; SOILS; SURFACES

Citation Formats

Mehta, Vimal, Deptt of Physics, Punjabi University, Patiala- 147 001, Singh, Tejinder Pal, E-mail: tejinders03@gmail.com, Chauhan, R. P., and Mudahar, G. S. Radon exhalation rates from some soil samples of Kharar, Punjab. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4929318.
Mehta, Vimal, Deptt of Physics, Punjabi University, Patiala- 147 001, Singh, Tejinder Pal, E-mail: tejinders03@gmail.com, Chauhan, R. P., & Mudahar, G. S. Radon exhalation rates from some soil samples of Kharar, Punjab. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4929318.
Mehta, Vimal, Deptt of Physics, Punjabi University, Patiala- 147 001, Singh, Tejinder Pal, E-mail: tejinders03@gmail.com, Chauhan, R. P., and Mudahar, G. S. 2015. "Radon exhalation rates from some soil samples of Kharar, Punjab". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4929318.
@article{osti_22488889,
title = {Radon exhalation rates from some soil samples of Kharar, Punjab},
author = {Mehta, Vimal and Deptt of Physics, Punjabi University, Patiala- 147 001 and Singh, Tejinder Pal, E-mail: tejinders03@gmail.com and Chauhan, R. P. and Mudahar, G. S.},
abstractNote = {Radon and its progeny are major contributors in the radiation dose received by general population of the world. Because radon is a noble gas, a large portion of it is free to migrate away from radium. The primary sources of radon in the houses are soils and rocks source emanations, emanation from building materials, and entry of radon into a structure from outdoor air. Keeping this in mind the study of radon exhalation rate from some soil samples of the Kharar, Punjab has been carried out using Can Technique. The equilibrium radon concentration in various soil samples of Kharar area of district Mohali varied from 12.7 Bqm{sup −3} to 82.9 Bqm{sup −3} with an average of 37.5 ± 27.0 Bqm{sup −3}. The radon mass exhalation rates from the soil samples varied from 0.45 to 2.9 mBq/kg/h with an average of 1.4 ± 0.9 mBq/kg/h and radon surface exhalation rates varied from 10.4 to 67.2 mBq/m{sup 2}/h with an average of 30.6 ± 21.8 mBq/m{sup 2}/h. The radon mass and surface exhalation rates of the soil samples of Kharar, Punjab were lower than that of the world wide average.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4929318},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 1675,
place = {United States},
year = 2015,
month = 8
}
  • In this study effective radium content and radon exhalation rates in soil samples collected from Adapazarı district of Sakarya, Turkey have been measured using LR-115 type-II plastic track detectors by closed-can technique for the first time. The obtained effective radium contents are found to vary from 6.66 to 34.32 Bqkg{sup −1} with a mean value of 18.01 Bqkg{sup −1}. The radon exhalation rates measured in terms of mass and area of soil samples are found to vary from 50.35-259.41 mBqkg{sup −1}h{sup −1} with a mean value of 136.12 mBqkg{sup −1}h{sup −1} and 1035.18-5333.39 mBqm{sup −2}h{sup −1} with a mean valuemore » of mBqm{sup −2}h{sup −1}. All the measurements show that the values of radium content are under the safe limit recommended by Organization for Cooperation and Development.« less
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  • A special set-up for continuous measurements of radon exhalation rate from soil is presented. It was constructed at Laboratory of Radiometric Expertise, Institute of Nuclear Physics Polish Academy of Sciences (IFJ PAN), Krakow, Poland. Radon exhalation rate was determined using the AlphaGUARD PQ2000 PRO (Genitron) radon monitor together with a special accumulation container which was put on the soil surface during the measurement. A special automatic device was built and used to raise and lower back onto the ground the accumulation container. The time of raising and putting down the container was controlled by an electronic timer. This set-up mademore » it possible to perform 4–6 automatic measurements a day. Besides, some additional soil and meteorological parameters were continuously monitored. In this way, the diurnal and seasonal variability of radon exhalation rate from soil can be studied as well as its dependence on soil properties and meteorological conditions.« less
  • The Environmental Measurements Laboratory hosted the Sixth International Radon Metrology Programme Intercomparison Test and Workshop (IRMP6) from 12-15 June 1995. Thirty participants representing 24 different institutions from 11 countries attended. Laboratory exercises consisted of {sup 220}Rn and {sup 222}Rn concentration measurements from a source container, and exhalation measurements from a {sup 226}Ra-spiked concrete slab and a {open_quotes}normal{close_quotes} concrete slab. Field exercises included soil gas radon measurements and radon exhalation measurements. In this report, we pooled the participants` data and used the ratio of the standard deviation (SD) to the arithmetic mean, expressed as a percentage, to assess participant agreement formore » each exercise. For the exhalation measurements from the {sup 226}Ra-spiked slab, this value is 37%; for soil gas {sup 222}Rn, this value is 120%, 36% and 27% for each depth range, 0.4-0.5, 0.6-0.75 and 0.9-1.0 m, respectively; for the surface exhalation measurements, this value is 34%. For the drum {sup 222}Rn measurements, the percent SD after removing a linear trend was 13%. These results indicate that sampling errors are greater than instrument errors. 11 refs., 8 figs., 8 tabs.« less