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Title: Acoustically enhanced heat transport

Abstract

We investigate the enhancement of heat transfer in the nucleate boiling regime by inducing high frequency acoustic waves (f ∼ 10{sup 6} Hz) on the heated surface. In the experiments, liquid droplets (deionized water) are dispensed directly onto a heated, vibrating substrate. At lower vibration amplitudes (ξ{sub s} ∼ 10{sup −9} m), the improved heat transfer is mainly due to the detachment of vapor bubbles from the heated surface and the induced thermal mixing. Upon increasing the vibration amplitude (ξ{sub s} ∼ 10{sup −8} m), the heat transfer becomes more substantial due to the rapid bursting of vapor bubbles happening at the liquid-air interface as a consequence of capillary waves travelling in the thin liquid film between the vapor bubble and the air. Further increases then lead to rapid atomization that continues to enhance the heat transfer. An acoustic wave displacement amplitude on the order of 10{sup −8} m with 10{sup 6} Hz order frequencies is observed to produce an improvement of up to 50% reduction in the surface temperature over the case without acoustic excitation.

Authors:
; ;  [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. School of Engineering, Monash University Malaysia, 47500 Bandar Sunway, Selangor (Malaysia)
  2. Micro/Nanophysics Research Laboratory, RMIT University, Melbourne, VIC 3001 (Australia)
  3. Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego, California 92093 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22482832
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Review of Scientific Instruments; Journal Volume: 87; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: (c) 2016 AIP Publishing LLC; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; AIR; AMPLITUDES; ATOMIZATION; BUBBLES; DROPLETS; EXCITATION; HEAT TRANSFER; INTERFACES; LIQUIDS; NUCLEATE BOILING; SOUND WAVES; SURFACES; VAPORS

Citation Formats

Ang, Kar M., Hung, Yew Mun, Tan, Ming K., E-mail: tan.ming.kwang@monash.edu, Yeo, Leslie Y., and Friend, James R. Acoustically enhanced heat transport. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4939757.
Ang, Kar M., Hung, Yew Mun, Tan, Ming K., E-mail: tan.ming.kwang@monash.edu, Yeo, Leslie Y., & Friend, James R. Acoustically enhanced heat transport. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4939757.
Ang, Kar M., Hung, Yew Mun, Tan, Ming K., E-mail: tan.ming.kwang@monash.edu, Yeo, Leslie Y., and Friend, James R. 2016. "Acoustically enhanced heat transport". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4939757.
@article{osti_22482832,
title = {Acoustically enhanced heat transport},
author = {Ang, Kar M. and Hung, Yew Mun and Tan, Ming K., E-mail: tan.ming.kwang@monash.edu and Yeo, Leslie Y. and Friend, James R.},
abstractNote = {We investigate the enhancement of heat transfer in the nucleate boiling regime by inducing high frequency acoustic waves (f ∼ 10{sup 6} Hz) on the heated surface. In the experiments, liquid droplets (deionized water) are dispensed directly onto a heated, vibrating substrate. At lower vibration amplitudes (ξ{sub s} ∼ 10{sup −9} m), the improved heat transfer is mainly due to the detachment of vapor bubbles from the heated surface and the induced thermal mixing. Upon increasing the vibration amplitude (ξ{sub s} ∼ 10{sup −8} m), the heat transfer becomes more substantial due to the rapid bursting of vapor bubbles happening at the liquid-air interface as a consequence of capillary waves travelling in the thin liquid film between the vapor bubble and the air. Further increases then lead to rapid atomization that continues to enhance the heat transfer. An acoustic wave displacement amplitude on the order of 10{sup −8} m with 10{sup 6} Hz order frequencies is observed to produce an improvement of up to 50% reduction in the surface temperature over the case without acoustic excitation.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4939757},
journal = {Review of Scientific Instruments},
number = 1,
volume = 87,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 1
}
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