skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Pneumothorax Complicating Coaxial and Non-coaxial CT-Guided Lung Biopsy: Comparative Analysis of Determining Risk Factors and Management of Pneumothorax in a Retrospective Review of 650 Patients

Abstract

PurposeTo assess the scope and determining risk factors related to the development of pneumothorax throughout CT-guided biopsy of pulmonary lesions in coaxial and non-coaxial techniques and the outcome of its management.Materials and MethodsThe study included CT-guided percutaneous lung biopsies in 650 consecutive patients (407 males, 243 females; mean age 54.6 years, SD 5.2) from November 2008 to June 2013 in a retrospective design. Patients were classified according to lung biopsy technique into coaxial group (318 lesions) and non-coaxial group (332 lesions). Exclusion criteria for biopsy were lesions <5 mm in diameter, uncorrectable coagulopathy, positive-pressure ventilation, severe respiratory compromise, pulmonary arterial hypertension, or refusal of the procedure. Risk factors related to the occurrence of pneumothorax were classified into: (a) Technical risk factors, (b) patient-related risk factors, and (c) lesion-associated risk factors. Radiological assessments were performed by two radiologists in consensus. Mann–Whitney U test and Fisher’s exact tests were used for statistical analysis. p values <0.05 were considered statistically significant.ResultsThe incidence of pneumothorax complicating CT-guided lung biopsy was less in the non-coaxial group (23.2 %, 77 out of 332) than the coaxial group (27 %, 86 out of 318). However, the difference in incidence between both groups was statistically insignificant (p = 0.14). Significant risk factors for themore » development of pneumothorax in both groups were emphysema (p < 0.001 in both groups), traversing a fissure with the biopsy needle (p value 0.005 in non-coaxial group and 0.001 in coaxial group), small lesion, less than 2 cm in diameter (p value of 0.02 in both groups), location of the lesion in the basal or mid sections of the lung (p = 0.003 and <0.001 in non-coaxial and coaxial groups, respectively), and increased needle track path within the lung tissue of more than 2.5 cm (p = 0.01 in both groups). The incidence of pneumothorax in the non-coaxial group was significantly correlated to the number of specimens obtained (p = 0.006). This factor was statistically insignificant in the coaxial group (p = 0.45). The biopsy yield was more diagnostic and conclusive in the coaxial group in comparison to the non-coaxial group (p = 0.008). Simultaneous incidence of pneumothorax and pulmonary hemorrhage was 27.3 % (21/77) in non-coaxial group and in 30.2 % (26/86) in coaxial group. Conservative management was sufficient for treatment of 91 out of 101 patients of pneumothorax in both groups (90.1 %). Manual evacuation of pneumothorax was efficient in 44/51 patients (86.3 %) in both groups and intercostal chest tube was applied after failure of manual evacuation (7 patients: 13.7 %), from which one patient developed a persistent air leakage necessitating pleurodesis.ConclusionPneumothorax complicating CT-guided core biopsy of pulmonary lesions, showed the insignificant difference between coaxial and non-coaxial techniques. However, both techniques have the same significant risk factors including small and basal lesions, increased lesion’s depth from pleural surface, and increased length of aerated lung parenchyma crossed by biopsy needle and passing through pulmonary fissures in the needle tract.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. Johan Wolfgang Goethe – University Hospital, Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22469604
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology; Journal Volume: 39; Journal Issue: 2; Conference: BSIR 2015: Britisch Society of Interventional Radiology 2015 annual meeting, Glasgow, Scotland (United Kingdom), 4-6 Nov 2015; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2016 Springer Science+Business Media New York and the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe (CIRSE); http://www.springer-ny.com; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; ANIMAL TISSUES; BIOPSY; CHEST; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; DEPTH; DESIGN; EMPHYSEMA; FAILURES; FEMALES; HAZARDS; HEMORRHAGE; HYPERTENSION; LEAKS; LUNGS; MALES; MATERIALS; PATIENTS; SURFACES; TUBES; VENTILATION; YIELDS

Citation Formats

Nour-Eldin, Nour-Eldin A., E-mail: nour410@hotmail.com, Alsubhi, Mohammed, E-mail: mohammedal-subhi@yahoo.com, Emam, Ahmed, E-mail: morgan101002@hotmail.com, Lehnert, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.lehnert@kgu.de, Beeres, Martin, E-mail: beeres@gmx.net, Jacobi, Volkmar, E-mail: volkmar.jacobi@kgu.de, Gruber-Rouh, Tatjana, E-mail: tatjanagruber2004@yahoo.com, Scholtz, Jan-Erik, E-mail: janerikscholtz@gmail.com, Vogl, Thomas J., E-mail: t.vogl@em.uni-frankfurt.de, and Naguib, Nagy N., E-mail: nagynnn@yahoo.com. Pneumothorax Complicating Coaxial and Non-coaxial CT-Guided Lung Biopsy: Comparative Analysis of Determining Risk Factors and Management of Pneumothorax in a Retrospective Review of 650 Patients. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1007/S00270-015-1167-3.
Nour-Eldin, Nour-Eldin A., E-mail: nour410@hotmail.com, Alsubhi, Mohammed, E-mail: mohammedal-subhi@yahoo.com, Emam, Ahmed, E-mail: morgan101002@hotmail.com, Lehnert, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.lehnert@kgu.de, Beeres, Martin, E-mail: beeres@gmx.net, Jacobi, Volkmar, E-mail: volkmar.jacobi@kgu.de, Gruber-Rouh, Tatjana, E-mail: tatjanagruber2004@yahoo.com, Scholtz, Jan-Erik, E-mail: janerikscholtz@gmail.com, Vogl, Thomas J., E-mail: t.vogl@em.uni-frankfurt.de, & Naguib, Nagy N., E-mail: nagynnn@yahoo.com. Pneumothorax Complicating Coaxial and Non-coaxial CT-Guided Lung Biopsy: Comparative Analysis of Determining Risk Factors and Management of Pneumothorax in a Retrospective Review of 650 Patients. United States. doi:10.1007/S00270-015-1167-3.
Nour-Eldin, Nour-Eldin A., E-mail: nour410@hotmail.com, Alsubhi, Mohammed, E-mail: mohammedal-subhi@yahoo.com, Emam, Ahmed, E-mail: morgan101002@hotmail.com, Lehnert, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.lehnert@kgu.de, Beeres, Martin, E-mail: beeres@gmx.net, Jacobi, Volkmar, E-mail: volkmar.jacobi@kgu.de, Gruber-Rouh, Tatjana, E-mail: tatjanagruber2004@yahoo.com, Scholtz, Jan-Erik, E-mail: janerikscholtz@gmail.com, Vogl, Thomas J., E-mail: t.vogl@em.uni-frankfurt.de, and Naguib, Nagy N., E-mail: nagynnn@yahoo.com. Mon . "Pneumothorax Complicating Coaxial and Non-coaxial CT-Guided Lung Biopsy: Comparative Analysis of Determining Risk Factors and Management of Pneumothorax in a Retrospective Review of 650 Patients". United States. doi:10.1007/S00270-015-1167-3.
@article{osti_22469604,
title = {Pneumothorax Complicating Coaxial and Non-coaxial CT-Guided Lung Biopsy: Comparative Analysis of Determining Risk Factors and Management of Pneumothorax in a Retrospective Review of 650 Patients},
author = {Nour-Eldin, Nour-Eldin A., E-mail: nour410@hotmail.com and Alsubhi, Mohammed, E-mail: mohammedal-subhi@yahoo.com and Emam, Ahmed, E-mail: morgan101002@hotmail.com and Lehnert, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.lehnert@kgu.de and Beeres, Martin, E-mail: beeres@gmx.net and Jacobi, Volkmar, E-mail: volkmar.jacobi@kgu.de and Gruber-Rouh, Tatjana, E-mail: tatjanagruber2004@yahoo.com and Scholtz, Jan-Erik, E-mail: janerikscholtz@gmail.com and Vogl, Thomas J., E-mail: t.vogl@em.uni-frankfurt.de and Naguib, Nagy N., E-mail: nagynnn@yahoo.com},
abstractNote = {PurposeTo assess the scope and determining risk factors related to the development of pneumothorax throughout CT-guided biopsy of pulmonary lesions in coaxial and non-coaxial techniques and the outcome of its management.Materials and MethodsThe study included CT-guided percutaneous lung biopsies in 650 consecutive patients (407 males, 243 females; mean age 54.6 years, SD 5.2) from November 2008 to June 2013 in a retrospective design. Patients were classified according to lung biopsy technique into coaxial group (318 lesions) and non-coaxial group (332 lesions). Exclusion criteria for biopsy were lesions <5 mm in diameter, uncorrectable coagulopathy, positive-pressure ventilation, severe respiratory compromise, pulmonary arterial hypertension, or refusal of the procedure. Risk factors related to the occurrence of pneumothorax were classified into: (a) Technical risk factors, (b) patient-related risk factors, and (c) lesion-associated risk factors. Radiological assessments were performed by two radiologists in consensus. Mann–Whitney U test and Fisher’s exact tests were used for statistical analysis. p values <0.05 were considered statistically significant.ResultsThe incidence of pneumothorax complicating CT-guided lung biopsy was less in the non-coaxial group (23.2 %, 77 out of 332) than the coaxial group (27 %, 86 out of 318). However, the difference in incidence between both groups was statistically insignificant (p = 0.14). Significant risk factors for the development of pneumothorax in both groups were emphysema (p < 0.001 in both groups), traversing a fissure with the biopsy needle (p value 0.005 in non-coaxial group and 0.001 in coaxial group), small lesion, less than 2 cm in diameter (p value of 0.02 in both groups), location of the lesion in the basal or mid sections of the lung (p = 0.003 and <0.001 in non-coaxial and coaxial groups, respectively), and increased needle track path within the lung tissue of more than 2.5 cm (p = 0.01 in both groups). The incidence of pneumothorax in the non-coaxial group was significantly correlated to the number of specimens obtained (p = 0.006). This factor was statistically insignificant in the coaxial group (p = 0.45). The biopsy yield was more diagnostic and conclusive in the coaxial group in comparison to the non-coaxial group (p = 0.008). Simultaneous incidence of pneumothorax and pulmonary hemorrhage was 27.3 % (21/77) in non-coaxial group and in 30.2 % (26/86) in coaxial group. Conservative management was sufficient for treatment of 91 out of 101 patients of pneumothorax in both groups (90.1 %). Manual evacuation of pneumothorax was efficient in 44/51 patients (86.3 %) in both groups and intercostal chest tube was applied after failure of manual evacuation (7 patients: 13.7 %), from which one patient developed a persistent air leakage necessitating pleurodesis.ConclusionPneumothorax complicating CT-guided core biopsy of pulmonary lesions, showed the insignificant difference between coaxial and non-coaxial techniques. However, both techniques have the same significant risk factors including small and basal lesions, increased lesion’s depth from pleural surface, and increased length of aerated lung parenchyma crossed by biopsy needle and passing through pulmonary fissures in the needle tract.},
doi = {10.1007/S00270-015-1167-3},
journal = {Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology},
number = 2,
volume = 39,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Feb 15 00:00:00 EST 2016},
month = {Mon Feb 15 00:00:00 EST 2016}
}
  • Our goal was to assess the usefulness of spirometry to estimate the risk of pneumothorax in patients undergoing percutaneous needle biopsy with CT guidance for solitary pulmonary nodule (SPN). We studied the results of 51 consecutive percutaneous needle biopsies with CT guidance for SPN obtained between 1988 and 1990. Forty-five men and six women, aged 65 {+-} 11 (36-86) years, were included in the study. All biopsies were performed under CT guidance, with 90 mm 25G needles (0.5 mm thickness) fitted into luer-type syringes. The number of needle pass attempts never exceeded three. A spirometry before biopsy was performed inmore » all patients. Pneumothorax occurred in only 10 cases (19%). The patients with pneumothorax showed lower lesion size, forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume (FEV{sub 1}), and FEV{sub 1}/FVC ratio. The contribution of these factors to pneurnothorax was analyzed by a logistic regression model. The FEV{sub 1} was most strongly associated with the incidence of pneumothorax. We developed an equation for predicting the risk of this complication. We conclude that decreasing FEV{sub 1} is associated with a higher neurnothorax rate. 15 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.« less
  • Purpose: To compare the accuracy and complication rate of two different CT-guided transthoracic needle biopsy techniques: fine needle aspiration and an automated biopsy device.Methods: Two consecutive series of respectively 125 (group A) and 98 (group B) biopsies performed using 20-22 gauge coaxial fine needle aspiration (group A) and an automated 19.5 gauge coaxial biopsy device (group B) were compared in terms of their accuracy and complication rate.Results: Groups A and B included respectively 100 (80%) and 77 (79%) malignant lesions and 25 (20%) and 18 (21%) benign lesions. No significant difference was found between the two series concerning patients, lesions,more » and procedural variables. For a diagnosis of malignancy, a statistically significant difference in sensitivity was found (82.7% vs 97.4%) between results obtained with the automated biopsy device and fine needle aspiration respectively. For a diagnosis of malignancy, the false negative rate of the biopsy result was significantly higher (p <0.005) in group A (17%) than in group B (2.6%). For a specific diagnosis of benignity, no statistically significant difference was found between the two groups (44% vs 26%) but the automated biopsy device provided fewer indeterminate cases. There was no difference between the two groups concerning the pneumothorax rate, which was 20% in group A and 15% in group B, or the hemoptysis rate, which was 2.4% in group A and 4% in group B.Conclusion: For a diagnosis of malignancy when a cytopathologist is not available on-site, automated biopsy devices provide a lower rate of false negative results and a similar complication rate to fine needle aspiration.« less
  • The purpose was to evaluate ex-vivo a prototype of a novel biopsy canula under CT fluoroscopy-guidance in ventilated porcine lung explants in respiratory motion simulations. Using an established chest phantom for porcine lung explants, n = 24 artificial lesions consisting of a fat-wax-Lipiodol mixture (approx. 70HU) were placed adjacent to sensible structures such as aorta, pericardium, diaphragm, bronchus and pulmonary artery. A piston pump connected to a reservoir beneath a flexible silicone reconstruction of a diaphragm simulated respiratory motion by rhythmic inflation and deflation of 1.5 L water. As biopsy device an 18-gauge prototype biopsy canula with a lancet-like, helicallymore » bended cutting edge was used. The artificial lesions were punctured under CT fluoroscopy-guidance (SOMATOM Sensation 64, Siemens, Erlangen, Germany; 30mAs/120 kV/5 mm slice thickness) implementing a dedicated protocol for CT fluoroscopy-guided lung biopsy. The mean-diameter of the artificial lesions was 8.3 {+-} 2.6 mm, and the mean-distance of the phantom wall to the lesions was 54.1 {+-} 13.5 mm. The mean-displacement of the lesions by respiratory motion was 14.1 {+-} 4.0 mm. The mean-duration of CT fluoroscopy was 9.6 {+-} 5.1 s. On a 4-point scale (1 = central; 2 = peripheral; 3 = marginal; 4 = off target), the mean-targeted precision was 1.9 {+-} 0.9. No misplacement of the biopsy canula affecting adjacent structures could be detected. The novel steerable biopsy canula proved to be efficient in the ex-vivo set-up. The chest phantom enabling respiratory motion and the steerable biopsy canula offer a feasible ex-vivo system for evaluating and training CT fluoroscopy-guided lung biopsy adapted to respiratory motion.« less
  • PurposeTo evaluate the use of a self-expanding tract sealant device (BioSentry™) on the rates of pneumothorax and chest tube insertion after percutaneous lung biopsy.Materials and MethodsIn this retrospective study, we compared 318 patients who received BioSentry™ during percutaneous lung biopsy (treated group) with 1956 patients who did not (control group). Patient-, lesion-, and procedure-specific variables, and pneumothorax and chest tube insertion rates were recorded. To adjust for potential selection bias, patients in the treated group were matched 1:1 to patients in the control group using propensity score matching based on the above-mentioned variables. Patients were considered a match if themore » absolute difference in their propensity scores was ≤equal to 0.02.ResultsBefore matching, the pneumothorax and chest tube rates were 24.5 and 13.1% in the control group, and 21.1 and 8.5% in the treated group, respectively. Using propensity scores, a match was found for 317 patients in the treatment group. Chi-square contingency matched pair analysis showed the treated group had significantly lower pneumothorax (20.8 vs. 32.8%; p = 0.001) and chest tube (8.2 vs. 20.8%; p < 0.0001) rates compared to the control group. Sub-analysis including only faculty who had >30 cases of both treatment and control cases demonstrated similar findings: the treated group had significantly lower pneumothorax (17.6 vs. 30.2%; p = 0.002) and chest tube (7.2 vs. 18%; p = 0.001) rates.ConclusionsThe self-expanding tract sealant device significantly reduced the pneumothorax rate, and more importantly, the chest tube placement rate after percutaneous lung biopsy.« less
  • Purpose: We retrospectively investigated the impact of weight change (WC) during concurrent chemoradiation therapy (C-CRT) on clinical outcomes of stage 3B non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Methods and Materials: A total of 425 patients treated with C-CRT were included. All patients received 60 to 66 Gy of thoracic radiation therapy concurrently with 1 to 3 cycles of platinum-based chemotherapy. Pre- and posttreatment weight measurements on first and last days of C-CRT were used for WC. Patients were divided into 2 groups: group 1 = weight loss (WL); group 2 = weight preservation/gain (WP) for comparative analyses. Results: Following C-CRT,more » 252 patients (59.3%) experienced WL, while 89 patients (20.9%) and 84 patients (19.8%) showed WP or WG. At median 24.2 months of follow-up, 142 patients (33.4%) were alive (84 WP [48.6%] and 58 WL [23.0%]), and 58 (13.6%) of them were free of disease progression (41 [23.7%] for WP and 17 [6.7%] for WL). Median overall survival (OS), locoregional progression-free survival (LRPFS), progression-free survival (PFS), and distant metastases-free survival (DMFS) for the entire population were 22.8, 14.4, 10.6, and 11.7 months, respectively. Intergroup comparisons between WP and WL cohorts revealed significantly superior OS, LRPFS, PFS, and DMFS in WP patients (P<.05 for each). On multivariate analyses, only WL and advanced T stage were associated with poor prognosis (P<.05). Conclusions: Present results in 425 stage 3B NSCLC patients demonstrated that WL during C-CRT is strongly associated with inferior survival outcomes compared to WP. This emerging finding might be useful by forming an encouraging basis for future investigations in facilitating a way to improve the outcomes of these patients experiencing WL during C-CRT.« less