skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: MEK5 suppresses osteoblastic differentiation

Abstract

Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 5 (ERK5) is a member of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family and is activated by its upstream kinase, MAPK kinase 5 (MEK5), which is a member of the MEK family. Although the role of MEK5 has been investigated in several fields, little is known about its role in osteoblastic differentiation. In this study, we have demonstrated the role of MEK5 in osteoblastic differentiation in mouse preosteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells and bone marrow stromal ST2 cells. We found that treatment with BIX02189, an inhibitor of MEK5, increased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and the gene expression of ALP, osteocalcin (OCN) and osterix, as well as it enhanced the calcification of the extracellular matrix. Moreover, osteoblastic cell proliferation decreased at a concentration of greater than 0.5 μM. In addition, knockdown of MEK5 using siRNA induced an increase in ALP activity and in the gene expression of ALP, OCN, and osterix. In contrast, overexpression of wild-type MEK5 decreased ALP activity and attenuated osteoblastic differentiation markers including ALP, OCN and osterix, but promoted cell proliferation. In summary, our results indicated that MEK5 suppressed the osteoblastic differentiation, but promoted osteoblastic cell proliferation. These results implied that MEK5 may play a pivotal role in cellmore » signaling to modulate the differentiation and proliferation of osteoblasts. Thus, inhibition of MEK5 signaling in osteoblasts may be of potential use in the treatment of osteoporosis. - Highlights: • MEK5 inhibitor BIX02189 suppresses proliferation of osteoblasts. • MEK5 knockdown and MEK5 inhibitor promote differentiation of osteoblasts. • MEK5 overexpression inhibits differentiation of osteoblasts.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2]; ; ;  [3];  [3]
  1. Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Japan Community Health Care Organization Osaka Hospital, 4-2-78 Fukushima, Fukushima Ward, Osaka City, Osaka 553-0003 (Japan)
  2. (Japan)
  3. Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22462118
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications; Journal Volume: 463; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2015 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ALKALINE PHOSPHATASE; BONE MARROW; CELL PROLIFERATION; CONNECTIVE TISSUE CELLS; GENES; INHIBITION; MICE; OSTEOPOROSIS; SIGNALS

Citation Formats

Kaneshiro, Shoichi, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Otsuki, Dai, Yoshida, Kiyoshi, Yoshikawa, Hideki, and Higuchi, Chikahisa, E-mail: c-higuchi@umin.ac.jp. MEK5 suppresses osteoblastic differentiation. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1016/J.BBRC.2015.05.035.
Kaneshiro, Shoichi, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Otsuki, Dai, Yoshida, Kiyoshi, Yoshikawa, Hideki, & Higuchi, Chikahisa, E-mail: c-higuchi@umin.ac.jp. MEK5 suppresses osteoblastic differentiation. United States. doi:10.1016/J.BBRC.2015.05.035.
Kaneshiro, Shoichi, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Otsuki, Dai, Yoshida, Kiyoshi, Yoshikawa, Hideki, and Higuchi, Chikahisa, E-mail: c-higuchi@umin.ac.jp. 2015. "MEK5 suppresses osteoblastic differentiation". United States. doi:10.1016/J.BBRC.2015.05.035.
@article{osti_22462118,
title = {MEK5 suppresses osteoblastic differentiation},
author = {Kaneshiro, Shoichi and Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 and Otsuki, Dai and Yoshida, Kiyoshi and Yoshikawa, Hideki and Higuchi, Chikahisa, E-mail: c-higuchi@umin.ac.jp},
abstractNote = {Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 5 (ERK5) is a member of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family and is activated by its upstream kinase, MAPK kinase 5 (MEK5), which is a member of the MEK family. Although the role of MEK5 has been investigated in several fields, little is known about its role in osteoblastic differentiation. In this study, we have demonstrated the role of MEK5 in osteoblastic differentiation in mouse preosteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells and bone marrow stromal ST2 cells. We found that treatment with BIX02189, an inhibitor of MEK5, increased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and the gene expression of ALP, osteocalcin (OCN) and osterix, as well as it enhanced the calcification of the extracellular matrix. Moreover, osteoblastic cell proliferation decreased at a concentration of greater than 0.5 μM. In addition, knockdown of MEK5 using siRNA induced an increase in ALP activity and in the gene expression of ALP, OCN, and osterix. In contrast, overexpression of wild-type MEK5 decreased ALP activity and attenuated osteoblastic differentiation markers including ALP, OCN and osterix, but promoted cell proliferation. In summary, our results indicated that MEK5 suppressed the osteoblastic differentiation, but promoted osteoblastic cell proliferation. These results implied that MEK5 may play a pivotal role in cell signaling to modulate the differentiation and proliferation of osteoblasts. Thus, inhibition of MEK5 signaling in osteoblasts may be of potential use in the treatment of osteoporosis. - Highlights: • MEK5 inhibitor BIX02189 suppresses proliferation of osteoblasts. • MEK5 knockdown and MEK5 inhibitor promote differentiation of osteoblasts. • MEK5 overexpression inhibits differentiation of osteoblasts.},
doi = {10.1016/J.BBRC.2015.05.035},
journal = {Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications},
number = 3,
volume = 463,
place = {United States},
year = 2015,
month = 7
}
  • Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) regulate proliferation and differentiation in osteoblasts. The vertebral homologue of nemo, nemo-like kinase (NLK), is an atypical MAPK that targets several signaling components, including the T-cell factor/lymphoid enhancer factor (TCF/Lef1) transcription factor. Recent studies have shown that NLK forms a complex with the histone H3-K9 methyltransferase SETDB1 and suppresses peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-gamma:: action in the mesenchymal cell line ST2. Here we investigated whether NLK regulates osteoblastic differentiation. We showed that NLK mRNA is expressed in vivo in osteoblasts at embryonic day 18.5 (E18.5) mouse calvariae. By using retrovirus vectors, we performed forced expression of NLKmore » in primary calvarial osteoblasts (pOB cells) and the mesenchymal cell line ST2. Wild-type NLK (NLK-WT) suppressed alkaline phosphatase activity and expression of bone marker genes such as alkaline phosphatase, type I procollagen, runx2, osterix, steopontin and osteocalcin in these cells. NLK-WT also decreased type I collagen protein expression in pOB and ST2 cells. Furthermore, mineralized nodule formation was reduced in pOB cells overexpressing NLK-WT. In contrast, kinase-negative form of NLK (NLK-KN) did not suppress or partially suppress ALP activity and bone marker gene expression in pOB and ST2 cells. NLK-KN did not suppress nodule formation in pOB cells. In addition to forced expression, suppression of endogenous NLK expression by siRNA increased bone marker gene expression in pOB and ST2 cells. Finally, transcriptional activity analysis of gene promoters revealed that NLK-WT suppressed Wnt1 activation of TOP flash promoter and Runx2 activation of the osteocalcin promoter. Taken together, these results suggest that NLK negatively regulates osteoblastic differentiation.« less
  • Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is clinically used as an autologous blood product to stimulate bone formation in vivo. In the present study, we examined the effects of PRP on proliferation and osteoblast differentiation in vitro in the presence of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs). PRP and its soluble fraction stimulated osteoblastic differentiation of myoblasts and osteoblastic cells in the presence of BMP-2, BMP-4, BMP-6 or BMP-7. The soluble PRP fraction stimulated osteoblastic differentiation in 3D cultures using scaffolds made of collagen or hydroxyapatite. Moreover, heparin-binding fractions obtained from serum also stimulated osteoblastic differentiation in the presence of BMP-4. These results suggested thatmore » platelets contain not only growth factors for proliferation but also novel potentiator(s) for BMP-dependent osteoblastic differentiation.« less
  • Although various microRNAs regulate cell differentiation and proliferation, no miRNA has been reported so far to play an important role in the regulation of osteoblast differentiation. Here we describe the role of miR-125b in osteoblastic differentiation in mouse mesenchymal stem cells, ST2, by regulating cell proliferation. The expression of miR-125b was time-dependently increased in ST2 cells, and the increase in miR-125b expression was attenuated in osteoblastic-differentiated ST2 cells induced by BMP-4. The transfection of exogenous miR-125b inhibited proliferation of ST2 cells and caused inhibition of osteoblastic differentiation. In contrast, when the endogenous miR-125b was blocked by transfection of its antisensemore » RNA molecule, alkaline phosphatase activity after BMP-4 treatment was elevated. These results strongly suggest that miR-125b is involved in osteoblastic differentiation through the regulation of cell proliferation.« less
  • Recent studies have suggested that nicotine critically affects bone metabolism. Many studies have examined the effects of nicotine on proliferation and differentiation, but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. We examined cell cycle regulators involved in the proliferation and differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells. Nicotine induced cell proliferation in association with p53 down-regulation and cyclin D1 up-regulation. In differentiated cells, nicotine reduced alkaline phosphatase activity and mineralized nodule formation in dose-dependent manners. Furthermore, p53 expression was sustained in nicotine-treated cells during differentiation. These findings indicate that nicotine promotes the cell cycle and inhibits differentiation in association with p53 regulation in pre-osteoblasticmore » cells.« less
  • {alpha}- and {beta}-Catenin link cadherins to the actin-based cytoskeleton at adherens junctions and regulate cell-cell adhesion. Although roles of cadherins and canonical Wnt-/{beta}-catenin-signaling in osteoblastic differentiation have been extensively studied, the role of {alpha}-catenin is not known. Murine embryonic mesenchymal stem cells, C3H10T1/2 cells, were transduced with retrovirus encoding {alpha}-catenin (MSCV-{alpha}-catenin-HA-GFP). In the presence of Wnt-3A conditioned medium or osteogenic medium ({beta}-glycerol phosphate and ascorbic acid), cells overexpressing {alpha}-catenin showed enhanced osteoblastic differentiation as measured by alkaline phosphatase (ALP) staining and ALP activity assay compared to cells transduced with empty virus (MSCV-GFP). In addition, mRNA expression of osteocalcin and Runx2more » was significantly increased compared to control. Cell aggregation assay revealed that {alpha}-catenin overexpression has significantly increased cell-cell aggregation. However, cellular {beta}-catenin levels (total, cytoplasmic-nuclear ratio) and {beta}-catenin-TCF/LEF transcriptional activity did not change by overexpression of {alpha}-catenin. Knock-down of {alpha}-catenin using siRNA decreased osteoblastic differentiation as measured by ALP assay. These results suggest that {alpha}-catenin overexpression increases osteoblastic differentiation by increasing cell-cell adhesion rather than Wnt-/{beta}-catenin-signaling.« less