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Title: Predicting proton titration in cationic micelle and bilayer environments

Abstract

Knowledge of the protonation behavior of pH-sensitive molecules in micelles and bilayers has significant implications in consumer product development and biomedical applications. However, the calculation of pK{sub a}’s in such environments proves challenging using traditional structure-based calculations. Here we apply all-atom constant pH molecular dynamics with explicit ions and titratable water to calculate the pK{sub a} of a fatty acid molecule in a micelle of dodecyl trimethylammonium chloride and liquid as well as gel-phase bilayers of diethyl ester dimethylammonium chloride. Interestingly, the pK{sub a} of the fatty acid in the gel bilayer is 5.4, 0.4 units lower than that in the analogous liquid bilayer or micelle, despite the fact that the protonated carboxylic group is significantly more desolvated in the gel bilayer. This work illustrates the capability of all-atom constant pH molecular dynamics in capturing the delicate balance in the free energies of desolvation and Coulombic interactions. It also shows the importance of the explicit treatment of ions in sampling the protonation states. The ability to model dynamics of pH-responsive substrates in a bilayer environment is useful for improving fabric care products as well as our understanding of the side effects of anti-inflammatory drugs.

Authors:
;  [1]; ; ;  [2]
  1. Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland 21201 (United States)
  2. Computational Chemistry, Modeling and Simulation GCO, Procter and Gamble, Cincinnati, Ohio 45201 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22419843
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Chemical Physics; Journal Volume: 141; Journal Issue: 8; Other Information: (c) 2014 AIP Publishing LLC; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; ATOMS; CARBOXYLIC ACIDS; FREE ENERGY; GELS; INTERACTIONS; LAYERS; LIQUIDS; MOLECULAR DYNAMICS METHOD; PROTONS; SIDE EFFECTS; SUBSTRATES; TITRATION

Citation Formats

Morrow, Brian H., Shen, Jana K., Eike, David M., Murch, Bruce P., and Koenig, Peter H.. Predicting proton titration in cationic micelle and bilayer environments. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4893439.
Morrow, Brian H., Shen, Jana K., Eike, David M., Murch, Bruce P., & Koenig, Peter H.. Predicting proton titration in cationic micelle and bilayer environments. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4893439.
Morrow, Brian H., Shen, Jana K., Eike, David M., Murch, Bruce P., and Koenig, Peter H.. 2014. "Predicting proton titration in cationic micelle and bilayer environments". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4893439.
@article{osti_22419843,
title = {Predicting proton titration in cationic micelle and bilayer environments},
author = {Morrow, Brian H. and Shen, Jana K. and Eike, David M. and Murch, Bruce P. and Koenig, Peter H.},
abstractNote = {Knowledge of the protonation behavior of pH-sensitive molecules in micelles and bilayers has significant implications in consumer product development and biomedical applications. However, the calculation of pK{sub a}’s in such environments proves challenging using traditional structure-based calculations. Here we apply all-atom constant pH molecular dynamics with explicit ions and titratable water to calculate the pK{sub a} of a fatty acid molecule in a micelle of dodecyl trimethylammonium chloride and liquid as well as gel-phase bilayers of diethyl ester dimethylammonium chloride. Interestingly, the pK{sub a} of the fatty acid in the gel bilayer is 5.4, 0.4 units lower than that in the analogous liquid bilayer or micelle, despite the fact that the protonated carboxylic group is significantly more desolvated in the gel bilayer. This work illustrates the capability of all-atom constant pH molecular dynamics in capturing the delicate balance in the free energies of desolvation and Coulombic interactions. It also shows the importance of the explicit treatment of ions in sampling the protonation states. The ability to model dynamics of pH-responsive substrates in a bilayer environment is useful for improving fabric care products as well as our understanding of the side effects of anti-inflammatory drugs.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4893439},
journal = {Journal of Chemical Physics},
number = 8,
volume = 141,
place = {United States},
year = 2014,
month = 8
}
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