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Title: TH-C-12A-04: Dosimetric Evaluation of a Modulated Arc Technique for Total Body Irradiation

Abstract

Purpose: A simplified Total Body Irradiation (TBI) was developed to work with minimal requirements in a compact linac room without custom motorized TBI couch. Results were compared to our existing fixed-gantry double 4 MV linac TBI system with prone patient and simultaneous AP/PA irradiation. Methods: Modulated arc irradiates patient positioned in prone/supine positions along the craniocaudal axis. A simplified inverse planning method developed to optimize dose rate as a function of gantry angle for various patient sizes without the need of graphical 3D treatment planning system. This method can be easily adapted and used with minimal resources. Fixed maximum field size (40×40 cm2) is used to decrease radiation delivery time. Dose rate as a function of gantry angle is optimized to result in uniform dose inside rectangular phantoms of various sizes and a custom VMAT DICOM plans were generated using a DICOM editor tool. Monte Carlo simulations, film and ionization chamber dosimetry for various setups were used to derive and test an extended SSD beam model based on PDD/OAR profiles for Varian 6EX/ TX. Measurements were obtained using solid water phantoms. Dose rate modulation function was determined for various size patients (100cm − 200cm). Depending on the size of themore » patient arc range varied from 100° to 120°. Results: A PDD/OAR based beam model for modulated arc TBI therapy was developed. Lateral dose profiles produced were similar to profiles of our existing TBI facility. Calculated delivery time and full arc depended on the size of the patient (∼8min/ 100° − 10min/ 120°, 100 cGy). Dose heterogeneity varied by about ±5% − ±10% depending on the patient size and distance to the surface (buildup region). Conclusion: TBI using simplified modulated arc along craniocaudal axis of different size patients positioned on the floor can be achieved without graphical / inverse 3D planning.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. Brigham and Women's Hospital/ Dana-Farber Institute/ Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22412514
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 41; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2014 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; 60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; DOSE RATES; FILM DOSIMETRY; LINEAR ACCELERATORS; PATIENTS; PHANTOMS; PLANNING; RADIOTHERAPY; WHOLE-BODY IRRADIATION

Citation Formats

Tsiamas, P, Czerminska, M, Makrigiorgos, G, Karen, M, and Zygmanski, P. TH-C-12A-04: Dosimetric Evaluation of a Modulated Arc Technique for Total Body Irradiation. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4889641.
Tsiamas, P, Czerminska, M, Makrigiorgos, G, Karen, M, & Zygmanski, P. TH-C-12A-04: Dosimetric Evaluation of a Modulated Arc Technique for Total Body Irradiation. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4889641.
Tsiamas, P, Czerminska, M, Makrigiorgos, G, Karen, M, and Zygmanski, P. 2014. "TH-C-12A-04: Dosimetric Evaluation of a Modulated Arc Technique for Total Body Irradiation". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4889641.
@article{osti_22412514,
title = {TH-C-12A-04: Dosimetric Evaluation of a Modulated Arc Technique for Total Body Irradiation},
author = {Tsiamas, P and Czerminska, M and Makrigiorgos, G and Karen, M and Zygmanski, P},
abstractNote = {Purpose: A simplified Total Body Irradiation (TBI) was developed to work with minimal requirements in a compact linac room without custom motorized TBI couch. Results were compared to our existing fixed-gantry double 4 MV linac TBI system with prone patient and simultaneous AP/PA irradiation. Methods: Modulated arc irradiates patient positioned in prone/supine positions along the craniocaudal axis. A simplified inverse planning method developed to optimize dose rate as a function of gantry angle for various patient sizes without the need of graphical 3D treatment planning system. This method can be easily adapted and used with minimal resources. Fixed maximum field size (40×40 cm2) is used to decrease radiation delivery time. Dose rate as a function of gantry angle is optimized to result in uniform dose inside rectangular phantoms of various sizes and a custom VMAT DICOM plans were generated using a DICOM editor tool. Monte Carlo simulations, film and ionization chamber dosimetry for various setups were used to derive and test an extended SSD beam model based on PDD/OAR profiles for Varian 6EX/ TX. Measurements were obtained using solid water phantoms. Dose rate modulation function was determined for various size patients (100cm − 200cm). Depending on the size of the patient arc range varied from 100° to 120°. Results: A PDD/OAR based beam model for modulated arc TBI therapy was developed. Lateral dose profiles produced were similar to profiles of our existing TBI facility. Calculated delivery time and full arc depended on the size of the patient (∼8min/ 100° − 10min/ 120°, 100 cGy). Dose heterogeneity varied by about ±5% − ±10% depending on the patient size and distance to the surface (buildup region). Conclusion: TBI using simplified modulated arc along craniocaudal axis of different size patients positioned on the floor can be achieved without graphical / inverse 3D planning.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4889641},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 41,
place = {United States},
year = 2014,
month = 6
}
  • Purpose: To develop optimal beam parameters and to verify the dosimetric aspects of the recently developed modulated-arc total-body irradiation (MATBI) technique, which delivers an inverse-planned dose to the entire body using gantry rotation. Methods: The patient is positioned prone and supine underneath the gantry at about 2 m source-to-surface distance (SSD). Then, up to 28 beams irradiate the patient from different gantry angles. Based on full-body computed-tomography (CT) images of the patient, the weight of each beam is optimized, using inverse planning, to create a uniform body dose. This study investigates how to best simulate patients and the ideal beammore » setup parameters, such as field size, number of beams, and beam geometry, for treatment time and dose homogeneity. In addition, three anthropomorphic water phantoms were constructed and utilized to verify the accuracy of dose delivery, with both diode array and ion chamber measurements. Furthermore, to improve the accuracy of the new technique, a beam model is created specifically for the extended-SSD positioning for MATBI. Results: Low dose CT scans can be utilized for dose calculations without affecting the accuracy. The largest field size of 40 Multiplication-Sign 40 cm{sup 2} was found to deliver the most uniform dose in the least amount of time. Moreover, a higher number of beams improves dose homogeneity. The average dose discrepancy between ion chamber measurements and extended-SSD beam model calculations was 1.2%, with the largest discrepancy being 3.2%. This average dose discrepancy was 1.4% with the standard beam model for delivery at isocenter. Conclusions: The optimum beam setup parameters, regarding dose uniformity and treatment duration, are laid out for modulated-arc TBI. In addition, the presented dose measurements show that these treatments can be delivered accurately. These measurements also indicated that a new beam model did not significantly improve the accuracy of dose calculations. The optimum beam setup parameters along with the measurements performed to ensure accurate dose delivery serve as a useful guide for the clinical implementation of MATBI.« less
  • Purpose: To perform a dosimetric evaluation on a new developed volumetric modulated arc therapy based total body irradiation (VMAT-TBI). Methods: Three patients were CT scanned with an indexed rotatable body frame to get whole body CT images. Concatenated CT images were imported in Pinnacle treatment planning system and whole body and lung were contoured as PTV and organ at risk, respectively. Treatment plans were generated by matching multiple isocenter volumetric modulated arc (VMAT) fields of the upper body and multiple isocenter parallel-opposed fields of the lower body. For each plan, 1200 cGy in 8 fractions was prescribed to the wholemore » body volume and the lung dose was constrained to a mean dose of 750 cGy. Such a two-level dose plan was achieved by inverse planning of the torso VMAT fields. For comparison, conventional standing TBI (cTBI) plans were generated on the same whole body CT images at an extended SSD (550cm).The shape of compensators and lung blocks are simulated using body segments and lung contours Compensation was calculated based on the patient CT images, in mimic of the standing TBI treatment. The whole body dose distribution of cTBI plans were calculated with a home-developed GPU Monte Carlo dose engine. Calculated cTBI dose distribution was prescribed to the mid-body point at umbilical level. Results: The VMAT-TBI treatment plans of three patients’ plans achieved 80.2%±5.0% coverage of the total body volume within ±10% of the prescription dose, while cTBI treatment plans achieved 72.2%±4.0% coverage of the total body volume. The averaged mean lung dose of all three patients is lower for VMAT-TBI (7.48 cGy) than for cTBI (8.96 cGy). Conclusion: The proposed patient comfort-oriented VMAT-TBI technique provides for a uniform dose distribution within the total body while reducing the dose to the lungs.« less
  • Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric feasibility of linear accelerator-based intensity-modulated total marrow irradiation (IM-TMI) in patients with hematologic malignancies. Methods and Materials: Linear accelerator-based IM-TMI treatment planning was performed for 9 patients using the Eclipse treatment planning system. The planning target volume (PTV) consisted of all the bones in the body from the head to the mid-femur, except for the forearms and hands. Organs at risk (OAR) to be spared included the lungs, heart, liver, kidneys, brain, eyes, oral cavity, and bowel and were contoured by a physician on the axial computed tomography images. The three-isocenter technique previously developed bymore » our group was used for treatment planning. We developed and used a common dose-volume objective method to reduce the planning time and planner subjectivity in the treatment planning process. Results: A 95% PTV coverage with the 99% of the prescribed dose of 12 Gy was achieved for all nine patients. The average dose reduction in OAR ranged from 19% for the lungs to 68% for the lenses. The common dose-volume objective method decreased the planning time by an average of 35% and reduced the inter- and intra- planner subjectivity. Conclusion: The results from the present study suggest that the linear accelerator-based IM-TMI technique is clinically feasible. We have demonstrated that linear accelerator-based IM-TMI plans with good PTV coverage and improved OAR sparing can be obtained within a clinically reasonable time using the common dose-volume objective method proposed in the present study.« less
  • The American College of Radiology practice guideline for total body irradiation (TBI) requires a back-up treatment delivery system. This study investigates the development of helical tomotherapy (HT) for delivering TBI and compares it with conventional extended source-to-surface distance (X-SSD) technique. Four patients' head-to-thigh computed tomographic images were used in this study, with the target defined as the body volume without the left and right lungs. HT treatment plans with the standard TBI prescription (1.2 Gy/fx, 10 fractions) were generated and verified on phantoms. To compare HT plans with X-SSD treatment, the dose distribution of X-SSD technique was simulated using themore » Eclipse software. The average dose received by 90% of the target volume was 12.3 Gy (range, 12.2-12.4 Gy) for HT plans and 10.3 Gy (range, 10.08-10.58 Gy) for X-SSD plans (p < 0.001). The left and right lung median doses were 5.44 Gy and 5.40 Gy, respectively, for HT plans and 8.34 Gy and 8.95 Gy, respectively, for X-SSD treatment. The treatment planning time was comparable between the two methods. The beam delivery time of HT treatment was longer than X-SSD treatment. In conclusion, HT-based TBI plans have better dose coverage to the target and better dose sparing to the lungs compared with X-SSD technique, which applies dose compensators, lung blocks, and electron boosts. This study demonstrates that HT is possible for delivering TBI. Clinical validation of the feasibility of this approach would be of interest in the future.« less
  • Purpose: To compare dosimetric differences between conventional two-beam helmet field irradiation (external beam radiotherapy, EBRT) of the brain and a two-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) technique. Methods and Materials: Ten patients who received helmet field irradiation at our institution were selected for study. External beam radiotherapy portals were planned per usual practice. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy fields were created using the identical field angles as the EBRT portals. Each brain was fully contoured along with the spinal cord to the bottom of the C2 vertebral body. This volume was then expanded symmetrically by 0.5 cm to construct the planning target volume. An IMRTmore » plan was constructed using uniform optimization constraints. For both techniques, the nominal prescribed dose was 3,000 cGy in 10 fractions of 300 cGy using 6-MV photons. Comparative dose-volume histograms were generated for each patient and analyzed. Results: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy improved dose uniformity over EBRT for whole brain radiotherapy. The mean percentage of brain receiving >105% of dose was reduced from 29.3% with EBRT to 0.03% with IMRT. The mean maximum dose was reduced from 3,378 cGy (113%) for EBRT to 3,162 cGy (105%) with IMRT. The mean percent volume receiving at least 98% of the prescribed dose was 99.5% for the conventional technique and 100% for IMRT. Conclusions: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy reduces dose inhomogeneity, particularly for the midline frontal lobe structures where hot spots occur with conventional two-field EBRT. More study needs to be done addressing the clinical implications of optimizing dose uniformity and its effect on long-term cognitive function in selected long-lived patients.« less