skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Temperature-dependent mechanical deformation of silicon at the nanoscale: Phase transformation versus defect propagation

Abstract

This study uses high-temperature nanoindentation coupled with in situ electrical measurements to investigate the temperature dependence (25–200 °C) of the phase transformation behavior of diamond cubic (dc) silicon at the nanoscale. Along with in situ indentation and electrical data, ex situ characterizations, such as Raman and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy, have been used to reveal the indentation-induced deformation mechanisms. We find that phase transformation and defect propagation within the crystal lattice are not mutually exclusive deformation processes at elevated temperature. Both can occur at temperatures up to 150 °C but to different extents, depending on the temperature and loading conditions. For nanoindentation, we observe that phase transformation is dominant below 100 °C but that deformation by twinning along (111) planes dominates at 150 °C and 200 °C. This work, therefore, provides clear insight into the temperature dependent deformation mechanisms in dc-Si at the nanoscale and helps to clarify previous inconsistencies in the literature.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;  [1];  [1];  [2]
  1. Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Australian Capital Territory, Canberra 2601 (Australia)
  2. (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22410266
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Journal of Applied Physics
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 117; Journal Issue: 20; Other Information: (c) 2015 AIP Publishing LLC; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Journal ID: ISSN 0021-8979
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; CRYSTAL DEFECTS; CRYSTAL LATTICES; DEFORMATION; DIAMONDS; NANOSTRUCTURES; PHASE TRANSFORMATIONS; RAMAN SPECTROSCOPY; SILICON; TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE; TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY; TWINNING

Citation Formats

Kiran, M. S. R. N., E-mail: kiran.mangalampalli@anu.edu.au, Tran, T. T., Smillie, L. A., Subianto, D., Williams, J. S., Bradby, J. E., Haberl, B., and Chemical and Engineering Materials Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831. Temperature-dependent mechanical deformation of silicon at the nanoscale: Phase transformation versus defect propagation. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4921534.
Kiran, M. S. R. N., E-mail: kiran.mangalampalli@anu.edu.au, Tran, T. T., Smillie, L. A., Subianto, D., Williams, J. S., Bradby, J. E., Haberl, B., & Chemical and Engineering Materials Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831. Temperature-dependent mechanical deformation of silicon at the nanoscale: Phase transformation versus defect propagation. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4921534.
Kiran, M. S. R. N., E-mail: kiran.mangalampalli@anu.edu.au, Tran, T. T., Smillie, L. A., Subianto, D., Williams, J. S., Bradby, J. E., Haberl, B., and Chemical and Engineering Materials Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831. Thu . "Temperature-dependent mechanical deformation of silicon at the nanoscale: Phase transformation versus defect propagation". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4921534.
@article{osti_22410266,
title = {Temperature-dependent mechanical deformation of silicon at the nanoscale: Phase transformation versus defect propagation},
author = {Kiran, M. S. R. N., E-mail: kiran.mangalampalli@anu.edu.au and Tran, T. T. and Smillie, L. A. and Subianto, D. and Williams, J. S. and Bradby, J. E. and Haberl, B. and Chemical and Engineering Materials Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831},
abstractNote = {This study uses high-temperature nanoindentation coupled with in situ electrical measurements to investigate the temperature dependence (25–200 °C) of the phase transformation behavior of diamond cubic (dc) silicon at the nanoscale. Along with in situ indentation and electrical data, ex situ characterizations, such as Raman and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy, have been used to reveal the indentation-induced deformation mechanisms. We find that phase transformation and defect propagation within the crystal lattice are not mutually exclusive deformation processes at elevated temperature. Both can occur at temperatures up to 150 °C but to different extents, depending on the temperature and loading conditions. For nanoindentation, we observe that phase transformation is dominant below 100 °C but that deformation by twinning along (111) planes dominates at 150 °C and 200 °C. This work, therefore, provides clear insight into the temperature dependent deformation mechanisms in dc-Si at the nanoscale and helps to clarify previous inconsistencies in the literature.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4921534},
journal = {Journal of Applied Physics},
issn = {0021-8979},
number = 20,
volume = 117,
place = {United States},
year = {2015},
month = {5}
}