skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: WE-A-17A-11: Implanted Brachytherapy Seed Movement Due to Transrectal Ultrasound Probe-Induced Prostate Deformation

Abstract

Purpose: To characterize the movement of implanted brachytherapy seeds due to transrectal ultrasound probe-induced prostate deformation and to estimate the effects on prostate dosimetry. Methods: Implanted probe-in and probe-removed seed distributions were reconstructed for 10 patients using C-arm fluoroscopy imaging. The prostate was delineated on ultrasound and registered to the fluoroscopy seeds using a visible subset of seeds and residual needle tracks. A linear tensor and shearing model correlated the seed movement with position. The seed movement model was used to infer the underlying prostate deformation and to simulate the prostate contour without probe compression. Changes in prostate and surrogate urethra dosimetry were calculated. Results: Seed movement patterns reflecting elastic decompression, lateral shearing, and rectal bending were observed. Elastic decompression was characterized by anterior-posterior expansion and superior-inferior and lateral contractions. For lateral shearing, anterior movement up to 6 mm was observed for extraprostatic seeds in the lateral peripheral region. The average intra-prostatic seed movement was 1.3 mm, and the residual after linear modeling was 0.6 mm. Prostate D90 increased by 4 Gy on average (8 Gy max) and was correlated with elastic decompression. For selected patients, lateral shearing resulted in differential change in D90 of 7 Gy between anterior andmore » posterior quadrants, and increase in whole prostate D90 of 4 Gy. Urethra D10 increased by 4 Gy. Conclusion: Seed movement upon probe removal was characterized. The proposed model captured the linear correlation between seed movement and position. Whole prostate dose coverage increased slightly, due to the small but systematic seed movement associated with elastic decompression. Lateral shearing movement increased dose coverage in the anterior-lateral region, at the expense of the posterior-lateral region. The effect on whole prostate D90 was smaller due to the subset of peripheral seeds involved, but lateral shearing movement can have greater consequences for local dose coverage.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1];  [2]; ; ;  [3];  [2];  [4]
  1. Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)
  2. (Canada)
  3. Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta (Canada)
  4. Canterbury District Health Board, Christchurch (New Zealand)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22407865
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 41; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2014 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; BRACHYTHERAPY; FLUOROSCOPY; PATIENTS; PROSTATE; RADIATION DOSES; RADIATION SOURCE IMPLANTS; RECTUM; URINARY TRACT

Citation Formats

Liu, D, Usmani, N, Sloboda, R, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Meyer, T, Husain, S, Angyalfi, S, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, and Kay, I. WE-A-17A-11: Implanted Brachytherapy Seed Movement Due to Transrectal Ultrasound Probe-Induced Prostate Deformation. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4889381.
Liu, D, Usmani, N, Sloboda, R, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Meyer, T, Husain, S, Angyalfi, S, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, & Kay, I. WE-A-17A-11: Implanted Brachytherapy Seed Movement Due to Transrectal Ultrasound Probe-Induced Prostate Deformation. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4889381.
Liu, D, Usmani, N, Sloboda, R, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Meyer, T, Husain, S, Angyalfi, S, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, and Kay, I. 2014. "WE-A-17A-11: Implanted Brachytherapy Seed Movement Due to Transrectal Ultrasound Probe-Induced Prostate Deformation". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4889381.
@article{osti_22407865,
title = {WE-A-17A-11: Implanted Brachytherapy Seed Movement Due to Transrectal Ultrasound Probe-Induced Prostate Deformation},
author = {Liu, D and Usmani, N and Sloboda, R and University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta and Meyer, T and Husain, S and Angyalfi, S and University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta and Kay, I},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To characterize the movement of implanted brachytherapy seeds due to transrectal ultrasound probe-induced prostate deformation and to estimate the effects on prostate dosimetry. Methods: Implanted probe-in and probe-removed seed distributions were reconstructed for 10 patients using C-arm fluoroscopy imaging. The prostate was delineated on ultrasound and registered to the fluoroscopy seeds using a visible subset of seeds and residual needle tracks. A linear tensor and shearing model correlated the seed movement with position. The seed movement model was used to infer the underlying prostate deformation and to simulate the prostate contour without probe compression. Changes in prostate and surrogate urethra dosimetry were calculated. Results: Seed movement patterns reflecting elastic decompression, lateral shearing, and rectal bending were observed. Elastic decompression was characterized by anterior-posterior expansion and superior-inferior and lateral contractions. For lateral shearing, anterior movement up to 6 mm was observed for extraprostatic seeds in the lateral peripheral region. The average intra-prostatic seed movement was 1.3 mm, and the residual after linear modeling was 0.6 mm. Prostate D90 increased by 4 Gy on average (8 Gy max) and was correlated with elastic decompression. For selected patients, lateral shearing resulted in differential change in D90 of 7 Gy between anterior and posterior quadrants, and increase in whole prostate D90 of 4 Gy. Urethra D10 increased by 4 Gy. Conclusion: Seed movement upon probe removal was characterized. The proposed model captured the linear correlation between seed movement and position. Whole prostate dose coverage increased slightly, due to the small but systematic seed movement associated with elastic decompression. Lateral shearing movement increased dose coverage in the anterior-lateral region, at the expense of the posterior-lateral region. The effect on whole prostate D90 was smaller due to the subset of peripheral seeds involved, but lateral shearing movement can have greater consequences for local dose coverage.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4889381},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 41,
place = {United States},
year = 2014,
month = 6
}
  • The study investigated the movement of implanted brachytherapy seeds upon transrectal US probe removal, providing insight into the underlying prostate deformation and an estimate of the impact on prostate dosimetry. Implanted seed distributions, one obtained with the prostate under probe compression and another with the probe removed, were reconstructed using C-arm fluoroscopy imaging. The prostate, delineated on ultrasound images, was registered to the fluoroscopy images using seeds and needle tracks identified on ultrasound. A deformation tensor and shearing model was developed to correlate probe-induced seed movement with position. Changes in prostate TG-43 dosimetry were calculated. The model was used tomore » infer the underlying prostate deformation and to estimate the location of the prostate surface in the absence of probe compression. Seed movement patterns upon probe removal reflected elastic decompression, lateral shearing, and rectal bending. Elastic decompression was characterized by expansion in the anterior-posterior direction and contraction in the superior-inferior and lateral directions. Lateral shearing resulted in large anterior movement for extra-prostatic seeds in the lateral peripheral region. Whole prostate D90 increased up to 8 Gy, mainly due to the small but systematic seed movement associated with elastic decompression. For selected patients, lateral shearing movement increased prostate D90 by 4 Gy, due to increased dose coverage in the anterior-lateral region at the expense of the posterior-lateral region. The effect of shearing movement on whole prostate D90 was small compared to elastic decompression due to the subset of peripheral seeds involved, but is expected to have greater consequences for local dose coverage.« less
  • Prostate brachytherapy is an effective treatment option for early-stage prostate cancer. During a prostate brachytherapy procedure, transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) and fluoroscopy imaging modalities complement each other by providing good visualization of soft tissue and implanted seeds, respectively. Therefore, the registration of these two imaging modalities, which are readily available in the operating room, could facilitate intraoperative dosimetry, thus enabling physicians to implant additional seeds into the underdosed portions of the prostate while the patient is still on the operating table. It is desirable to register TRUS and fluoroscopy images by using the seeds as fiducial markers. Although the locations ofmore » all the implanted seeds can be reconstructed from three fluoroscopy images, only a fraction of these seeds can be located in TRUS images. It is challenging to register the TRUS and fluoroscopy images by using the identified seeds, since the correspondence between them is unknown. Furthermore, misdetection of nonseed structures as seeds can lead to the inclusion of spurious points in the data set. We developed a new method called iterative optimal assignment (IOA) to overcome these challenges in TRUS-fluoroscopy registration. By using the Hungarian method in an optimization framework, IOA computes a set of transformation parameters that yield the one-to-one correspondence with minimum cost. We have evaluated our registration method at varying noise levels, seed detection rates, and number of spurious points using data collected from 25 patients. We have found that IOA can perform registration with an average root mean square error of about 0.2 cm even when the seed detection rate is only 10%. We believe that IOA can offer a robust solution to seed-based TRUS-fluoroscopy registration, thus making intraoperative dosimetry possible.« less
  • A study was undertaken to assess the ability of transrectal ultrasound (TR/US), digital rectal examination (DRE), and Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA), to diagnose persistent prostate cancer following an I-125 seed implant (SI). Twenty-six patients formed the study group. The median follow-up time was 38 months, and the range was 20 to 60 months. Eighty-eight percent (23/26) had suspicious lesions on TR/US, followed by ultrasound-guided biopsies. Biopsies were performed only on those patients having suspicious lesions on TR/US. Histologically proven adenocarcinoma was found in 81% (21/26) of the patients. Statistical evaluation was done using tissue obtained at biopsy as the goldmore » standard. The sensitivities for the DRE and PSA were 33% and 76%, respectively. The specificities for DRE and PSA were 50% and 0%, respectively. The positive predictive values for cancer were 91% by TR/US, 100% by DRE, and 89% by PSA. The negative predictive values were 13% for DRE and 0% for PSA. Overall detection rates (N = 26) were 81% for TR/US, 27% for DRE, and 62% for PSA. We conclude that ultrasound criteria for the presence of cancer are the same for both the post-irradiated prostate and the untreated prostate, and that TR/US is the most sensitive test for the diagnosis of persistent local cancer following I125 seed implantation.« less
  • Purpose: In high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy of the prostate, radiation is delivered from a number of radioactive sources which are inserted via catheter into the target volume. The rectal mucosa also receives dose during the treatment, which may lead to late toxicity effects. To allow possible links between rectal dose and toxicity to be investigated, suitable methods of parametrising the rectal dose are needed. Methods: During treatment of a series of 95 patients, anatomy and catheter locations were monitored by transrectal ultrasound, and target volume positions were contoured on the ultrasound scan by the therapist. The anterior rectal mucosal wall wasmore » identified by contouring the transrectal ultrasound balloon within the ultrasound scan. Source positions and dwell times, along with the dose delivered to the patient were computed using the Oncentra Prostate treatment planning system (TPS). Data for the series of patients were exported from the TPS in Dicom format, and a series of parametrisation methods were developed in a Matlab environment to assess the rectal dose. Results: Contours of the anterior rectal mucosa were voxelised within Matlab to allow the dose to the rectal mucosa to be analysed directly from the 3D dose grid. Dose parametrisations based on dose-surface (DSH) and dose-line (DLH) histograms were obtained. Both lateral and longitudinal extents of the mucosal dose were parametrised using dose-line histograms in the relevant directions. Conclusion: We have developed a series of dose parametrisations for quantifying the dose to the rectal mucosa during HDR prostate brachytherapy which are suitable for future studies investigating potential associations between mucosal dose and late toxicity effects. The geometry of the transrectal probe standardises the rectal anatomy, making this treatment technique particularly suited to studies of this nature.« less
  • Prostate cancer is the third leading cause of death from cancer among men in the United States. Traditional treatments for prostate cancer are prostatectomy, external beam irradiation, and interstitial implantation of Iodine125 (I125) via laparotomy. These treatments are associated with significant morbidity and limitations. Based on experience with I125 interstitial implantation by transrectal ultrasound guidance for early-stage prostate cancer, it seems that this newer method of treatment has greater accuracy of placement and distribution of the isotope and has had few reported complications. The need for a surgical incision has been eliminated. Hospitalization time also has been decreased, creating themore » need for ambulatory and inpatient nurses to understand the importance of their respective roles in providing coordinated quality care for these patients. Nurses in these departments must have knowledge of the procedure, radiation safety, and common side effects related to the implant.« less