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Title: Phase-space jets drive transport and anomalous resistivity

Abstract

In the presence of wave dissipation, phase-space structures spontaneously emerge in nonlinear Vlasov dynamics. These structures include not only well-known self-trapped vortices (holes) but also elongated filaments, resembling jets, as reported in this work. These jets are formed by straining due to interacting holes. Jets are highly anisotropic, and connect low and high velocity regions over a range larger than the electron thermal velocity. Jets survive long enough for particles to scatter between low and high phase-space density regions. Jets are found to contribute significantly to electron redistribution, velocity-space transport, and anomalous resistivity.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [1];  [2]
  1. Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasuga Koen, Kasuga 816-8580 (Japan)
  2. (Japan)
  3. WCI Center for Fusion Theory, NFRI, Gwahangno 113, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of)
  4. (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22403263
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physics of Plasmas; Journal Volume: 21; Journal Issue: 11; Other Information: (c) 2014 AIP Publishing LLC; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; ELECTRONS; HOLES; JETS; NONLINEAR PROBLEMS; PHASE SPACE; STRAINS; TRAPPING; VELOCITY; VORTICES

Citation Formats

Lesur, M., E-mail: maxime.lesur@polytechnique.org, Research Center for Plasma Turbulence, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasuga Koen, Kasuga 816-8580, Diamond, P. H., CMTFO and CASS, UCSD, La Jolla, California 92093, Kosuga, Y., and Institute for Advanced Study and Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 816-8580. Phase-space jets drive transport and anomalous resistivity. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4902525.
Lesur, M., E-mail: maxime.lesur@polytechnique.org, Research Center for Plasma Turbulence, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasuga Koen, Kasuga 816-8580, Diamond, P. H., CMTFO and CASS, UCSD, La Jolla, California 92093, Kosuga, Y., & Institute for Advanced Study and Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 816-8580. Phase-space jets drive transport and anomalous resistivity. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4902525.
Lesur, M., E-mail: maxime.lesur@polytechnique.org, Research Center for Plasma Turbulence, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasuga Koen, Kasuga 816-8580, Diamond, P. H., CMTFO and CASS, UCSD, La Jolla, California 92093, Kosuga, Y., and Institute for Advanced Study and Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 816-8580. 2014. "Phase-space jets drive transport and anomalous resistivity". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4902525.
@article{osti_22403263,
title = {Phase-space jets drive transport and anomalous resistivity},
author = {Lesur, M., E-mail: maxime.lesur@polytechnique.org and Research Center for Plasma Turbulence, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasuga Koen, Kasuga 816-8580 and Diamond, P. H. and CMTFO and CASS, UCSD, La Jolla, California 92093 and Kosuga, Y. and Institute for Advanced Study and Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 816-8580},
abstractNote = {In the presence of wave dissipation, phase-space structures spontaneously emerge in nonlinear Vlasov dynamics. These structures include not only well-known self-trapped vortices (holes) but also elongated filaments, resembling jets, as reported in this work. These jets are formed by straining due to interacting holes. Jets are highly anisotropic, and connect low and high velocity regions over a range larger than the electron thermal velocity. Jets survive long enough for particles to scatter between low and high phase-space density regions. Jets are found to contribute significantly to electron redistribution, velocity-space transport, and anomalous resistivity.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4902525},
journal = {Physics of Plasmas},
number = 11,
volume = 21,
place = {United States},
year = 2014,
month =
}
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