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Title: Micelle-induced depletion interaction and resultant structure in charged colloidal nanoparticle system

Abstract

The evolution of the interaction and the resultant structure in the mixed system of anionic silica nanoparticles (Ludox LS30) and non-ionic surfactant decaethylene glycol monododecylether (C12E10), undergoing phase separation, have been studied using small-angle neutron scattering and dynamic light scattering. The measurements have been carried out for a fixed concentration of nanoparticle (1 wt. %) with varying concentration of surfactant (0 to 1 wt. %), in the absence and presence of an electrolyte. It is found that the micelles of non-ionic surfactant adsorb on the nanoparticle in the absence of electrolyte (form stable system), whereas these micelles become non-adsorbing in the presence of electrolyte (show phase separation). The phase separation arises because of C12E10 micelles, causing depletion interaction between nanoparticles and leading to their aggregation. The interaction is modeled by double Yukawa potential accounting for attractive depletion as well as repulsive electrostatic forces. Both the interactions (attraction and repulsion) are found to be of long-range. The nanoparticle aggregation (phase separation) is governed by the increase in the magnitude and the range of the depletion attraction with the increase in the surfactant concentration. The nanoparticle aggregates formed are quite large in size (order of micron) and are characterized by the surface fractal having simple cubicmore » packing of nanoparticles within the aggregates.« less

Authors:
;  [1];  [2]
  1. Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)
  2. Laboratory for Neutron Scattering, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 PSI Villigen (Switzerland)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22402937
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Applied Physics; Journal Volume: 117; Journal Issue: 16; Other Information: (c) 2015 AIP Publishing LLC; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; 71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; AGGLOMERATION; COLLOIDS; CONCENTRATION RATIO; ELECTROLYTES; FRACTALS; LIGHT SCATTERING; NANOPARTICLES; NEUTRON DIFFRACTION; SILICA; SMALL ANGLE SCATTERING; SURFACES; SURFACTANTS; YUKAWA POTENTIAL

Citation Formats

Ray, D., Aswal, V. K., E-mail: vkaswal@barc.gov.in, and Kohlbrecher, J. Micelle-induced depletion interaction and resultant structure in charged colloidal nanoparticle system. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4919359.
Ray, D., Aswal, V. K., E-mail: vkaswal@barc.gov.in, & Kohlbrecher, J. Micelle-induced depletion interaction and resultant structure in charged colloidal nanoparticle system. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4919359.
Ray, D., Aswal, V. K., E-mail: vkaswal@barc.gov.in, and Kohlbrecher, J. Tue . "Micelle-induced depletion interaction and resultant structure in charged colloidal nanoparticle system". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4919359.
@article{osti_22402937,
title = {Micelle-induced depletion interaction and resultant structure in charged colloidal nanoparticle system},
author = {Ray, D. and Aswal, V. K., E-mail: vkaswal@barc.gov.in and Kohlbrecher, J.},
abstractNote = {The evolution of the interaction and the resultant structure in the mixed system of anionic silica nanoparticles (Ludox LS30) and non-ionic surfactant decaethylene glycol monododecylether (C12E10), undergoing phase separation, have been studied using small-angle neutron scattering and dynamic light scattering. The measurements have been carried out for a fixed concentration of nanoparticle (1 wt. %) with varying concentration of surfactant (0 to 1 wt. %), in the absence and presence of an electrolyte. It is found that the micelles of non-ionic surfactant adsorb on the nanoparticle in the absence of electrolyte (form stable system), whereas these micelles become non-adsorbing in the presence of electrolyte (show phase separation). The phase separation arises because of C12E10 micelles, causing depletion interaction between nanoparticles and leading to their aggregation. The interaction is modeled by double Yukawa potential accounting for attractive depletion as well as repulsive electrostatic forces. Both the interactions (attraction and repulsion) are found to be of long-range. The nanoparticle aggregation (phase separation) is governed by the increase in the magnitude and the range of the depletion attraction with the increase in the surfactant concentration. The nanoparticle aggregates formed are quite large in size (order of micron) and are characterized by the surface fractal having simple cubic packing of nanoparticles within the aggregates.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4919359},
journal = {Journal of Applied Physics},
number = 16,
volume = 117,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Apr 28 00:00:00 EDT 2015},
month = {Tue Apr 28 00:00:00 EDT 2015}
}
  • The phase behavior anionic silica nanoparticle (Ludox LS30) with non-ionic surfactants decaethylene glycol monododecylether (C12E10) and cationic dodecyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (DTAB) in aqueous electrolyte solution has been studied by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The measurements have been carried out for fixed concentrations of nanoparticle (1 wt%), surfactants (1 wt%) and electrolyte (0.1 M NaCl). Each of these nanoparticle–surfactant systems has been examined for different contrast conditions where individual components (nanoparticle or surfactant) are made visible. It is observed that the nanoparticle-micelle system in both the cases lead to the aggregation of nanoparticles. The aggregation is found to be micelle depletion-inducedmore » for C12E10 whereas micelle-mediated aggregation for DTAB. Interestingly, it is also found that phase behavior of mixed surfactant (C12E10 + DTAB) system is similar to that of C12E10 (unlike DTAB) micelles with nanoparticles.« less
  • Nanoparticle-polymer system interestingly show a re-entrant phase behavior where charge stabilized silica nanoparticles (phase I) undergo particle clustering (phase II) and then back to individual particles (phase I) as a function of polymer concentration. Such phase behavior arises as a result of dominance of various interactions (i) nanoparticle-nanoparticle electrostatic repulsion (ii) polymer induced attractive depletion between nanoparticles and (iii) polymer-polymer repulsion, at different concentration regimes. Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) has been used to study the evolution of interaction during this re-entrant phase behavior of nanoparticles by contrast-marching the polymer. The SANS data have been modeled using a two-Yukawa potential accountingmore » for both attractive and repulsive parts of the interaction between nanoparticles. The degree of both of these parts has been separately tuned by varying the polymer concentration and ionic strength of the solution. Both of these parts are found to have long-range nature. At low polymer concentrations, the electrostatic repulsion dominates over the depletion attraction. The magnitude and the range of the depletion interaction increase with the polymer concentration leading to nanoparticle clustering. At higher polymer concentrations, the increased polymer-polymer repulsion reduces the strength of depletion leading to re-entrant phase behavior. The clusters formed under depletion attraction are found to have surface fractal morphology.« less
  • Combined small angle x-ray scattering and x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy studies of moderately concentrated bimodal hard-sphere colloidal suspensions in the fluid phase show that depletion-induced demixing introduces spatially heterogeneous dynamics with two distinct time scales. The adhesive nature, as well as the mobility, of the large particles is determined by the level of interaction within the monomodal domains. This interaction is driven by osmotic forces, which are governed by the relative concentration of the constituents.
  • NLRP3 inflammasome activation occurs in response to hazardous particle exposures and is critical for the development of particle-induced lung disease. Mechanisms of Lysosome Membrane Permeabilization (LMP), a central pathway for activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome by inhaled particles, are not fully understood. We demonstrate that the lysosomal vATPases inhibitor Bafilomycin A1 blocked LMP in vitro and ex vivo in primary murine macrophages following exposure to silica, multi-walled carbon nanotubes, and titanium nanobelts. Bafilomycin A1 treatment of particle-exposed macrophages also resulted in decreased active cathepsin L in the cytosol, a surrogate measure for leaked cathepsin B, which was associated with lessmore » NLRP3 inflammasome activity. Silica-induced LMP was partially dependent upon lysosomal cathepsins B and L, whereas nanoparticle-induced LMP occurred independent of cathepsin activity. Furthermore, inhibition of lysosomal cathepsin activity with CA-074-Me decreased the release of High Mobility Group Box 1. Together, these data support the notion that lysosome acidification is a prerequisite for particle-induced LMP, and the resultant leak of lysosome cathepsins is a primary regulator of ongoing NLRP3 inflammasome activity and release of HMGB1. - Highlights: • Silica and nanoparticles cause LMP in macrophages in vitro and in vivo. • Phagolysosome acidification is required for particle-induced LMP. • Cathepsin B and L are not required for nanoparticle-induced LMP. • Cathepsin B/L regulate the secretion of HMGB1 with particle exposure.« less