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Title: Bipolar resistive switching characteristics in tantalum nitride-based resistive random access memory devices

Abstract

This paper reports the bipolar resistive switching characteristics of TaN{sub x}-based resistive random access memory (ReRAM). The conduction mechanism is explained by formation and rupture of conductive filaments caused by migration of nitrogen ions and vacancies; this mechanism is in good agreement with either Ohmic conduction or the Poole-Frenkel emission model. The devices exhibit that the reset voltage varies from −0.82 V to −0.62 V, whereas the set voltage ranges from 1.01 V to 1.30 V for 120 DC sweep cycles. In terms of reliability, the devices exhibit good retention (>10{sup 5 }s) and pulse-switching endurance (>10{sup 6} cycles) properties. These results indicate that TaN{sub x}-based ReRAM devices have a potential for future nonvolatile memory devices.

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. School of Electrical Engineering, Anam-dong 5ga, Sungbuk-gu, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22402465
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters; Journal Volume: 106; Journal Issue: 20; Other Information: (c) 2015 AIP Publishing LLC; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; MEMORY DEVICES; NITROGEN IONS; PULSES; RANDOMNESS; TANTALUM; TANTALUM NITRIDES; VACANCIES

Citation Formats

Kim, Myung Ju, Jeon, Dong Su, Park, Ju Hyun, and Kim, Tae Geun, E-mail: tgkim1@korea.ac.kr. Bipolar resistive switching characteristics in tantalum nitride-based resistive random access memory devices. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4921349.
Kim, Myung Ju, Jeon, Dong Su, Park, Ju Hyun, & Kim, Tae Geun, E-mail: tgkim1@korea.ac.kr. Bipolar resistive switching characteristics in tantalum nitride-based resistive random access memory devices. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4921349.
Kim, Myung Ju, Jeon, Dong Su, Park, Ju Hyun, and Kim, Tae Geun, E-mail: tgkim1@korea.ac.kr. 2015. "Bipolar resistive switching characteristics in tantalum nitride-based resistive random access memory devices". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4921349.
@article{osti_22402465,
title = {Bipolar resistive switching characteristics in tantalum nitride-based resistive random access memory devices},
author = {Kim, Myung Ju and Jeon, Dong Su and Park, Ju Hyun and Kim, Tae Geun, E-mail: tgkim1@korea.ac.kr},
abstractNote = {This paper reports the bipolar resistive switching characteristics of TaN{sub x}-based resistive random access memory (ReRAM). The conduction mechanism is explained by formation and rupture of conductive filaments caused by migration of nitrogen ions and vacancies; this mechanism is in good agreement with either Ohmic conduction or the Poole-Frenkel emission model. The devices exhibit that the reset voltage varies from −0.82 V to −0.62 V, whereas the set voltage ranges from 1.01 V to 1.30 V for 120 DC sweep cycles. In terms of reliability, the devices exhibit good retention (>10{sup 5 }s) and pulse-switching endurance (>10{sup 6} cycles) properties. These results indicate that TaN{sub x}-based ReRAM devices have a potential for future nonvolatile memory devices.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4921349},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
number = 20,
volume = 106,
place = {United States},
year = 2015,
month = 5
}
  • The metal nanocrystals (NCs) embedded-NiN-based resistive random access memory cells are demonstrated using several metal NCs (i.e., Pt, Ni, and Ti) with different physical parameters in order to investigate the metal NC's dependence on resistive switching (RS) characteristics. First, depending on the electronegativity of metal, the size of metal NCs is determined and this affects the operating current of memory cells. If metal NCs with high electronegativity are incorporated, the size of the NCs is reduced; hence, the operating current is reduced owing to the reduced density of the electric field around the metal NCs. Second, the potential wells aremore » formed by the difference of work function between the metal NCs and active layer, and the barrier height of the potential wells affects the level of operating voltage as well as the conduction mechanism of metal NCs embedded memory cells. Therefore, by understanding these correlations between the active layer and embedded metal NCs, we can optimize the RS properties of metal NCs embedded memory cells as well as predict their conduction mechanisms.« less
  • The total ionizing dose (TID) effect of gamma-ray (γ-ray) irradiation on HfOx based resistive random access memory was investigated by electrical and material characterizations. The memory states can sustain TID level ∼5.2 Mrad (HfO{sub 2}) without significant change in the functionality or the switching characteristics under pulse cycling. However, the stability of the filament is weakened after irradiation as memory states are more vulnerable to flipping under the electrical stress. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was performed to ascertain the physical mechanism of the stability degradation, which is attributed to the Hf-O bond breaking by the high-energy γ-ray exposure.
  • No abstract prepared.
  • In this article, we investigate extensively the bipolar-switching properties of Al₂O₃- and HfO₂-based resistive-switching memory cells operated at low current down to <1 μA. We show that the switching characteristics differ considerably from those typically reported for larger current range (>15 μA), which we relate as intrinsic to soft-breakdown (SBD) regime. We evidence a larger impact of the used switching-oxide in this current range, due to lower density of oxygen-vacancy (V{sub o}) defects in the SBD regime. In this respect, deep resetting and large memory window may be achieved using the stoichiometric Al₂O₃ material due to efficient V{sub o} annihilation,more » although no complete erasure of the conductive-filament (CF) is obtained. We finally emphasize that the conduction may be described by a quantum point-contact (QPC) model down to very low current level where only a few V{sub o} defects compose the QPC constriction. The large switching variability inherent to this latter aspect is mitigated by CF shape tuning through adequate engineering of an Al₂O₃\HfO₂ bilayer.« less